PE Alderlea T5..first flight.

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
10,476
Southern IN
Yeah, as hot as it's been run so far, the glass is still totally clear.
Looks like a couple more cool nights coming, so I'll probably burn a couple partial loads. I'll cut the air sooner and more aggressively this time if I can, but at the same time I want to burn clean. Last time, at 400 the plume still wasn't totally clean. It's going to take some trial and error but I'm just about outta time until next fall...
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,013
South Puget Sound, WA
Has your SIL or your brother run the stove? How is it working for them?
 

Woody5506

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2017
694
Rochester NY
Only time the glass gets dirty is if you're burning not-so-seasoned wood, or cutting air down all the way too soon.

Regarding stove top temps, I think it takes a lot of actually overfire this stove. Not saying it should be run at some ridiculous temp but I've definitely let mine go a couple times and had the thermometer pegged over to the right. Only thing I could see was baffle rails inside the stove beginning to glow red. Shut the air off and within minutes the stove top temp is falling.
 
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Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
10,476
Southern IN
Has your SIL run the stove?
No...she is physics-ly challenged. ;) ;lol I told her to keep an eye on it and turn it down if it got hot at the end of the last load (a partial,) but I'm pretty sure it didn't, and she didn't say anything when I saw her later.
I want to get a good feel for how the stove runs, and then for how it will run on the various woods I've been getting for her. Then when I feel comfortable that I somewhat know what is going on, I'll bring her up to speed. That's on hold, as all we'll be doing over the next couple cool nights is burning a couple of short loads.
Has your brother run the stove?
No, he has a Regency F2400, and doesn't live here. But yeah, he would have a better feel for the stove than I do, coming from a cat...
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
10,476
Southern IN
Went over and lit a pretty good-sized load, top-down start. Two Red Oak in the lower corners, Dogwood round between those, and splits above that and right, with a Red Mulberry on the left. Easy start even though it was over 50 outside.
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The plume cleaned up pretty quickly as the kindling flamed well. There was a transition where the kindling was flamed out but not a lot of flame on the main load yet, and I think there was a little smoke, which seemed to clean up again as the main load flamed more. It was dusk, and getting hard to see the plume well.
At that point I had the air cut fairly low, surface flue meter about 270 maybe, and the stove top had climbed to 400 by the time I left, still rising.
She's going to keep an eye on it and if it looks like it wants to go to 700, she has a little more air she can cut.
She's going to log time, flue and stove top temps when she checks on it periodically. :)
She's enjoying the big window. :cool:
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,013
South Puget Sound, WA
I would add a couple splits on top if you are anticipating a cold night and want a longer burn. Maybe you already did that.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
10,476
Southern IN
No I didn't. It was still 68 in there, and with it only going down to 43 or so, I figured the partial load would hold room temp pretty well. Low-60s tomorrow. We'll probably do another partial again tomorrow evening.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
10,476
Southern IN
Those Dogwood coals will go for a while, too.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,013
South Puget Sound, WA
Ah ok, I was thinking you were seeing temps in the 30's like folks in MI, WI and NY are reporting.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
10,476
Southern IN
Ah ok, I was thinking you were seeing temps in the 30's like folks in MI, WI and NY are reporting.
I can only wish. ;) OTOH, these warmer temps are better for doing all the repairs on my beat-down 25 y.o. rides. ;lol
 

bcrtops

Feeling the Heat
Nov 14, 2016
275
NW Oregon
What do you guys use to lube the door hinges, trivet hinges and door latch roller? It appears that they greased them at the plant, but when the time comes, could I use B'laster Dry Lube PTFE or graphite spray, and not have to remove the door and trivets to apply grease?
The door latch mechanism seems to make a solid seal, with the gasket pressing against the flat front wall of the box, like the Buck 91 does. I didn't do the dollar-bill test, I will next time I'm over there. The website mentions a "knife-edge" door gasket seal...I guess that is on the steel-box-only models.
I know that begreen said no lube, but our hinge squeaked & the trivet hinges sounded horrible & difficult for the wife to move due to friction. Aerosol graphite has become my normal summer routine when cleaning chimney, baffle, interior. Trivet now always swings freely without noise, as well as the hinge assembly. I have had problems with the hinge pins (too short & moved down into the drilled door), but never had any issues with the door latch in all these years of use. Our wooden handle was drilled off-center, which looks a bit weird when going over the stove with an inspectors eye, but has always functioned properly.

Excessive smoke &/or soot on glass always cause by the following: 1) Wood not seasoned 2) Turning down air too soon 3) Having too small of a fire to start with & never getting up to clean burning temp, or small fire separating causing lower burn temps----- & 4) An air leak around the door or window gasket cooling the glass in that area.
 

Hogwildz

Minister of Fire
Soot on glass can be as simple as loading with split near or a couple inches from the glass. The ends of the splits with offgas against the glass causing it to soot up.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
10,476
Southern IN
Soot on glass can be as simple as loading with split near or a couple inches from the glass.
I have a small amount of soot in the left corner. I'll check the door and glass gaskets, but it's probably just that I grabbed a couple splits that weren't quite as dry. I've been burning stuff that I got out of the woods a couple weeks ago, and while you can somewhat judge by the heft how dry various species are, it's not an exact science. I did notice a little moisture on the end of a small round I put in Sunday AM. It wasn't bubbling, just a couple spots of dampness. The wood has been placed back of the boost manifold, so that's a couple inches at least from the glass.
I wanted to fire up Saturday night, but it got late on me so I went over Sunday AM. Nice top-down start with some Tulip kindling, and secondaries started firing really early, like five minutes or so. ==c
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Hard to see in the pic but upper left of that reflection, the side insulation is forming the hypotenuse of a right triangle with the side of the baffle and the horizontal top of the baffle/brick rail. A little flame was pulling into there, and back to the flue. I'll have to think about that, weather I'd rather have it going around the front of the baffle...I assume so.
I started cutting air but may have been a bit hasty. There was still some smoke when I looked, though not a lot. Stove was around 480 at that point...I think...shoulda took notes. ;lol
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I opened the air a little, and the plume cleaned up soon after. Nice secondaries off both the bottom and front holes. This was about the hottest the flue ever got. It comes down when you have less secondaries throwing heat up there.
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It seemed to be settling into a nice burn and leveled off about 580, and the flue came down to around 360, so I left with the air like it was, open just a touch. There was even a cute little secondary coming off the boost manifold. ;lol
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I went home and fired our stove, then went back in an hour to check on hers...cruising along, about where I left it. This is with 40+ outdoor temps, so we'll see next fall if it will still run with this kind of control. I feel like I'll have to add a second damper. Hard to believe at 15'.
I'm getting a little more comfortable, and really starting to like this stove...I might be falling for her. But I've loved every stove I've had so far, so take that with a grain of salt. ;)
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,013
South Puget Sound, WA
I feel like I'll have to add a second damper.
Leave it alone. The stove is working fine even if the person running it can use some fine-tuning.
 

EatenByLimestone

Minister of Fire
Jul 12, 2006
6,932
Schenectady, NY
I'm getting a little more comfortable, and really starting to like this stove...I might be falling for her. But I've loved every stove I've had so far, so take that with a grain of salt. ;)

*From Woody's stove to Woody's stove's friends*

I just don't know. I think he's cheating on me. He still comes home and stokes my fire... but it's not the same. I bet he's visiting that new non cat across town. You know their type, with that cast iron cladding and secondary light show! I bet she'll still put out heat with damp wood! Humph.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
10,476
Southern IN
Leave it alone.
I haven't done anything yet, just pondering what will happen in cold weather. Maybe you don't notice much difference, but average winter lows here are fifteen or twenty degrees below what you see. And you have a different stove. I'm already seeing flue surface temps pushing 400, and it was over 40 out. If we get a stretch of teens at night, below-freezing days, and I see flue surface flue temps pushing 500 with her blowing through a lot of wood, I'm gonna see that as a problem. As long as the stove can keep up at lower burn rates, while burning clean, that will be my goal. I have to cut at least six cords a year to keep up with our needs and the in-law stoves...not looking for more work.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
10,476
Southern IN
We're getting some abnormally cool weather here. I've been firing our Keystone with partial loads in the evening for the last couple of nights.
Yesterday afternoon, I stopped in at my SIL's. She had fired up her furnace, as it had gotten down to 60 in her house. Yikes, how is that place losing so much heat?? Our place was barely dipping below 70. I guess our basement is pumping more heat upstairs; She has a walk-out, ours is full. I'm also going to check out air leaks in her place, around door weather-stripping etc. I'll also put in the foam inserts under the electrical outlet plates, and see if I can seal better around her attic access and light fixtures in the ceiling. She has 2x4 walls. :(
She had only bumped up the furnace to 63, so we fired up another load in the T5. ==c
I started a top-down fire with a couple of SuperCedar chunks in the back/top, with a couple Pine kindling and small soft Maple splits. I figured that starting the fire in the back would get less wood burning, since the burn would have to work "upstream" toward the air wash. I thought I was cutting the air a little more aggressively once I saw secondaries starting, but I was a bit distracted by the Sixers/Raptors game 7, since the winners will have to face my Bucks. ==c I spaced out...I should have also closed the pipe damper earlier to limit the gassing of the load more and get her burning lower, around 600 like I had last time. As it turned out, it ended up going to 700 stove top, with 500 on the surface flue meter. That's a lot of heat wasted up the flue, as I see it.
In the pic you can see that I didn't have all big splits in there, but I have to work with what I had stacked for her before we decided to go with the T5. Most of the wood you see in this bay (one of four, with another full bay behind it) was gotten by me this spring. Some of it was still kind of wet so I thought I'd better split it.
I still have some dead Oak limbs and dead White Ash to grab and if they are low 20% moisture I won't split them as small, and try to leave more rounds to slow the burn.
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Woody5506

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2017
694
Rochester NY
Been firing mine up the past couple days with basically pallet oak kindling, small ash splits and let it mostly burn out, then add a couple bigger ash splits and I'm good for the evening/night.
 
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heavy hammer

Minister of Fire
Jul 18, 2015
1,424
Kirtland Ohio
Fired up both stoves tonight I have been burning the last of the cedar splits I have in the garage to clean it out. One stove load is good for an overnight burn/ to heat the house.