Placement of my stove

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Troossien

New Member
Oct 2, 2016
7
Central West Michigan
Hi all,
My wife and I just bought our first pellet stove (st croix prescott) to heat our 1200 Sq ft upstairs.. we are putting it in the living room but some family member have made suggestions that we should put the stove on a flat small section of wall directly across from the entry way to the rest of the house. For aesthetic purposes I would like to have it sitting on an angle in the corner of the living room facing that same entry way. the difference in distance is approximately 5 feet. My question to you folks is, will the 5 feet break me? This stove is rated for 1800 Sq ft and as I said before my home is 1200. All input is greatly appreciated!
-Tyler
 
Hard to answer the question as it depends on the convection loop generated in your house. You could try a fan in each location/height of stove and flag ribbon/tissue taped (painters tape) in various spots to try to determine the best convection.

Pics of potential set-up or floor plan would be helpful...
 
Hard to answer the question as it depends on the convection loop generated in your house. You could try a fan in each location/height of stove and flag ribbon/tissue taped (painters tape) in various spots to try to determine the best convection.

Pics of potential set-up or floor plan would be helpful...

Here is a picture of one of the layouts
 

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And here is a picture of the other potential location. Both pictures are taken from the entry way to the rest of the house
 
I would suspect that your desired location would be the better one just have to be careful about keeping draperies away as the exteriors do get hot. The location by the door would trouble me more with the potential of someone brushing up against it and getting burned as it appears to be a smaller entryway.

How does the house spread out from the LR? Hall to bedrooms from the area where photos were taken or straight back from the door?

Noticed the baby seat ... corner install will be easier to place gating around it if that is a future concern.
 
I would suspect that your desired location would be the better one just have to be careful about keeping draperies away as the exteriors do get hot. The location by the door would trouble me more with the potential of someone brushing up against it and getting burned as it appears to be a smaller entryway.

How does the house spread out from the LR? Hall to bedrooms from the area where photos were taken or straight back from the door?

Noticed the baby seat ... corner install will be easier to place gating around it if that is a future concern.

The hall to the left is bedrooms and bathroom to the right is dining and kithen
 

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Convection will do a decent job of moving the heat. I would think about the noise made by the stove and probably not put it next to a sofa where the family sits to watch tv.
 
I think it looks better AWAY from the door, both aesthetically and for the safety concerns as stated above.
 
Placement in the far corner should minimize noise interference with the TV. Ours is off to the side in the living room and you eventually become desensitized to the noise.
 
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I think it looks better AWAY from the door, both aesthetically and for the safety concerns as stated above.

No just wait a minute here...your location says "Florida".

What are you doing on our lawn (say the old grumpy New Englanders and Canadians)?
 
No just wait a minute here...your location says "Florida".

What are you doing on our lawn (say the old grumpy New Englanders and Canadians)?

Don't they have 'alley-gaters' in Florida? Do they get that cold?
 
Guess you folks haven't been in Florida around Christmas time? Visiting relatives near West Palm Beach one year, the locals sure gave us odd looks when swimming in the ocean;lol Depending on where you are in the state, lows can range from 40s to 60s so a little extra heat helps.

PS Not everyone lives in the Keys!
 
My first thought is unless that exhaust pipe going over the roof, you don't have required clearance for the doorway and window in that first location.
 
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In planning your exhaust set-up, you will have to include an outside air kit (OAK) for either location due to location of windows. With an OAK, minimum clearances are reduced to a minimum of 9" to doors/windows etc. along with other conditions noted on page 15. Without an OAK, 4' clearances.
http://stcroixstoves.com/pdf/installation/Prescott.pdf

Venting size of 3" or 4" will depend on your proposed venting set-up. Page 7 Keeping the number of elbows to a minimum allows the exhaust to vent with less restriction. Per the manual, you can use 4" for all configurations... A 3' vertical is recommended to promote natural draft that will minimize smoke back into the room in the event of power outage.

A corner install will be more difficult to access when cleaning the interior exhaust pathways and repairs. Real tight in the corner may not be the best long term.

While the stove is in the house already, you may want to move it temporarily outside to do a burn in. New stoves smell when first lit up due to paint in the firebox. If left inside, be prepare to open windows to dissipate the smell;)

Keep us posted ...
 
In planning your exhaust set-up, you will have to include an outside air kit (OAK) for either location due to location of windows. With an OAK, minimum clearances are reduced to a minimum of 9" to doors/windows etc. along with other conditions noted on page 15. Without an OAK, 4' clearances.
http://stcroixstoves.com/pdf/installation/Prescott.pdf

Venting size of 3" or 4" will depend on your proposed venting set-up. Page 7 Keeping the number of elbows to a minimum allows the exhaust to vent with less restriction. Per the manual, you can use 4" for all configurations... A 3' vertical is recommended to promote natural draft that will minimize smoke back into the room in the event of power outage.

A corner install will be more difficult to access when cleaning the interior exhaust pathways and repairs. Real tight in the corner may not be the best long term.

While the stove is in the house already, you may want to move it temporarily outside to do a burn in. New stoves smell when first lit up due to paint in the firebox. If left inside, be prepare to open windows to dissipate the smell;)

Keep us posted ...

I can get the end of the pipe to be 4' from the bay window which is the proper distance... even though not on the same wall do I still need 4 feet from the window on the other wall? (This is actually what you might call a "certified used" stove so the smell shouldn't be an issue!)
 
I can get the end of the pipe to be 4' from the bay window which is the proper distance... even though not on the same wall do I still need 4 feet from the window on the other wall? (This is actually what you might call a "certified used" stove so the smell shouldn't be an issue!)

Does the bay window have windows that open? If not, no need to worry about clearances.

If the window "not on the same wall" is around the corner I think you may be safe....but again, if you get the OAK installed it negates all of those worries, reducing the clearance to 9".

And the OAK, though adding a cost during the installation, will return the $$$ quickly.
 
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Sorry for the for the late response but we have everything all set here. the heat does have some issue getting down the hall but keeps the rooms warm enough ( we will see what winter brings) only issue I am having now is that the stove makes an occasional grinding noise.. not sure why or what it is. I will be asking the store soon in hopes that that I can get a definitive answer. here is our finished product.
 
A fan on the floor in the hallway blowing towards the stove will help promote warm air flowing towards the bedrooms.

Get after the dealer about the noise ... nothing should be grinding as it is brand new.
 
If you can put a wall mounted bookshelf above the TV, near the ceiling, with a small fan on it, you can move the hot air down your hallway nicely. And that will heat the other rooms.

I use a small Vornado fan for that in my house. There's a free standing bookshelf near the opening to my hallway, and the fan pushes air down the hall well at the lowest speed setting (Vornados are the best, imo - lots of air movement, and quiet). In my hallway, I can feel not only the hot air going down it, but the cold air coming back - slowly, just enough for the hairs on your leg to sense it.

Understanding how to set up an effective convection loop (or loops) in a house is one of the keys to heating successfully with a stove. I also set up my forced hot air furnace fan to run on a cycle timer, and those two fans distribute the air quite well in my layout.
 
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