poplar

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Rebelduckman

Minister of Fire
Dec 14, 2013
1,105
Pulaski, Mississippi
How quick does poplar dry and how does it burn? I've got several that needs to come down to clear a spot off
 

Auzzie Gumtree

Minister of Fire
Oct 17, 2012
535
Seasons slightly slower than pine - so a year and you are good to go. It burns slightly longer than pine.
 
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weatherguy

Minister of Fire
Feb 20, 2009
5,332
Central Mass
Not one of the better woods but if its free burn it, its probably good for your climate during shoulder seasons.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
10,492
Southern IN
Never burned any, except an odd limb here and there...those dried quick. I've got several dead ones, so I'm going to try splitting some small for starter wood. Hopefully, it'll replace the Pine....dirty-burning stuff.
 
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Standingdead

Burning Hunk
Oct 8, 2012
160
Saratoga county, NY
I see the OP is from Mississippi, where I imagine the winters are mild. IMO, Poplar is decent wood in such a place. It takes a year to dry and is a very light wood. Doesn't coal and creates a lot of ash. I believe it throws about the same BTU's as pine. It's wood, it burns, it's free, whats not to like?
 

Ralphie Boy

Minister of Fire
Feb 12, 2012
1,165
Rabbit Hash, Kentucky
I believe Standingdead is spot on with his statement. I burned a very large Yellow poplar last year for shoulder wood and it did okay for that. Like he said, leaves a lot of ash. The only reason I took it was a very nice older lady in the neighborhood needed the tree down and, being on a fixed income, did not have the $1500 the tree service wanted, So I took it down for her and "disposed" of everything at no charge. Two blocks is as far as I would go for it and that's if there wasn't anything else available for s while.
 

bigbarf48

Minister of Fire
Dec 21, 2012
837
Stone Mountain GA
I'm a fan of poplar. It's easy to split, seasons fast, and burns alright. The tulip I've burned has real stringy/fabric-y bark too that makes good tinder and kindling
 

Nick Mystic

Minister of Fire
Feb 12, 2013
1,109
Western North Carolina
When I cut down a lightning strike poplar earlier this year I was surprised when I attempted to split it. I started out using my 7 ton electric splitter and it would split the poplar, but it was very tedious due to how stringy it was. I'd run it the full length of the splitter (15" on a 20" round) and then I had to wrestle it apart with an axe to finish the split. Then one day I had a round that was a bit too long for the splitter and I had to spit it with my X27 splitting axe. I was shocked to see the big round pop apart with one blow and no strings! Needless to say I finished the job with my axe.
 

Mag Craft

Feeling the Heat
Apr 2, 2014
355
Wyoming
New here, I have found some good reading. I have a question, is cottonwood similar to poplar in burning characteristics. I have access to some and where I am at there is not a lot to choose from.
 

Jags

Moderate Moderator
Staff member
Aug 2, 2006
18,004
Northern IL
If you don't have many choices, then get it, but I would choose poplar over cottonwood every day of the week.

And welcome aboard.
 

Mag Craft

Feeling the Heat
Apr 2, 2014
355
Wyoming
When it gets warmer I can go to the mountains and get some pine, but there is a lot of cottonwood around Cheyenne and it seems like not very many people want it. Thanks.
 

Jags

Moderate Moderator
Staff member
Aug 2, 2006
18,004
Northern IL
What can I say, it burns. The rub comes in when you realize that you put in the same amount of time and energy into processing a lesser wood, than you will for the other woods available. If you have the time, energy and space then do it. It WILL burn and make heat. But I would walk around it to get to a better species if that was an option.
 

Mag Craft

Feeling the Heat
Apr 2, 2014
355
Wyoming
Well ok good enough. :cool:
 

Fred Wright

Minister of Fire
Dec 26, 2013
518
Delaware
www.nwedj.com
Tulip poplar is decent firewood for those not-real-cold days. You could do worse. Had a pair of dying poplars taken down in the yard when I lived in VA, burned it all the following year.

Splits easily enough and cures in a year. It burns up quickly so be prepared to load the stove more often.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
10,492
Southern IN
there is a lot of cottonwood around Cheyenne and it seems like not very many people want it.
That's because it will last in your stove about as long as cotton. ;lol If you're around to keep throwing more wood in, it can work....
 

Rebelduckman

Minister of Fire
Dec 14, 2013
1,105
Pulaski, Mississippi
What can I say, it burns. The rub comes in when you realize that you put in the same amount of time and energy into processing a lesser wood, than you will for the other woods available. If you have the time, energy and space then do it. It WILL burn and make heat. But I would walk around it to get to a better species if that was an option.
I've got 100 acres so plenty options. Looking to build a shed where they are and was interested since I've never burned any. I might give it a go. Can it be milled and used for anything? I've heard of old siding made from poplar
 

Jags

Moderate Moderator
Staff member
Aug 2, 2006
18,004
Northern IL
I've got 100 acres so plenty options. Looking to build a shed where they are and was interested since I've never burned any. I might give it a go. Can it be milled and used for anything? I've heard of old siding made from poplar
Is this in ref to poplar or cottonwood (as the OP was asking)? If you have to knock it down, it only makes sense to burn it. I have heard of poplar being milled but not cottonwood, but I am not well versed in mill stock.
 

Mag Craft

Feeling the Heat
Apr 2, 2014
355
Wyoming
Is this in ref to poplar or cottonwood (as the OP was asking)? If you have to knock it down, it only makes sense to burn it. I have heard of poplar being milled but not cottonwood, but I am not well versed in mill stock.
I believe it was referencing the Poplar.
 

BEConklin

Feeling the Heat
Jan 5, 2013
342
Connecticut
When we talk about "poplars" here, I wonder how many different species of trees we're talking about.
 

BrotherBart

Modestorator
Staff member
35
 

BrotherBart

Modestorator
Staff member
The genus includes Aspen and Cottonwood too.
 

Mag Craft

Feeling the Heat
Apr 2, 2014
355
Wyoming
The genus includes Aspen and Cottonwood too.

That is what I was wondering and why I was asking if cottonwood was similar to Poplar.
Like the site guys.
 

Wood Duck

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2009
4,790
Central PA
There are the 'true' poplars that are part of the genus Populus. Aspen, Cottonwood, White Poplar, and several other trees are the 'true' poplars and they are all similar as firewood. They have lightweight, white wood, easily split, dries pretty fast. There are probably six or seven species here in Pennsylvania,

The Tulip Poplar is not related to the 'true' poplars, and is actually related to magnolias. It has wood that has a distinctive greenish color and is a mid-grade firewood.

Tulip Poplar is commonly found in the lumber section of my local Home Depot labeled 'poplar,' You can tell it is Tulip Poplar because of the greenish color.
 
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