Question regarding Sticky thread -- Installing and operating an old stove

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Soup

New Member
Sep 27, 2020
30
Where it gets cold
The question that I have is regarding combustible surfaces behind the heat shield......

Are there assumptions made?..... are their considerations(to be considered)...
that the combustible surface is deemed as being..(or not being).........

(This is their general description:::
Combustible surfaces include floors, furniture, and walls of plaster, drywall or paneling. )))

(It is not that I am doing anything out of the ordinary behind the heat shield)

To be more clear....... Let me just quote from the document.... (page one immediately after table one)

"Once a location for a stove is established, prepare the area properly to ensure there is adequate clearance from any combustible surfaces. Combustible surfaces include floors, furniture, and walls of plaster, drywall or paneling. The proper distance from these combustible surfaces is determined by consulting three sources. If the stove is "listed," which means it was safety tested by an independent testing lab, there will be manufacturer's recommendations for clearance from combustibles.

If a stove is not listed, follow the National Fire Protection Association recommendations (see Table 1) for clearance from combustibles. However, either of these recommendations are superseded by local building codes. Check with the local building inspector to find out what clearance standards are enforced in your area. "

AND ALSO See Figure: #1

I italicized the above section.(I am concerned about).. and in viewing figure one..... there are no considerations
being presented for what is behind the 1" non-combustible spacers which are attached to the combustible surface.

(We can only assume Combustibles)

My question is not one of distances from combustibles... That is very clearly explained... and shown in Table one.......
The question is...... Treatment of these combustibles.....
(AND HERE..... I see this :::: prepare the area properly to ensure there is adequate clearance from any combustible surfaces. )

That is all........

I hope this clarifies my concerns.........

Basically: Exposed wood is my concern... this is what will be behind my shield.......
and with respect of reduction of clearances........
The reduction with the use of 1/4" durock is to 18"(my distance away will be greater than 18")

The idea is that my shield will hang on metal stud.(following venting and spacing guidelines for proper air circulation of heat shield)
Durock will be 1/2" thick.... and possibly have a ceramic tile adhered to it.
using "BaseStep" by UGL-Boral (Durock complimentary product for taping joints adhering tile)

Thanks, Soup
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
25,484
central pa
The question that I have is regarding combustible surfaces behind the heat shield......

Are there assumptions made?..... are their considerations(to be considered)...
that the combustible surface is deemed as being..(or not being).........

(This is their general description:::
Combustible surfaces include floors, furniture, and walls of plaster, drywall or paneling. )))

(It is not that I am doing anything out of the ordinary behind the heat shield)

To be more clear....... Let me just quote from the document.... (page one immediately after table one)

"Once a location for a stove is established, prepare the area properly to ensure there is adequate clearance from any combustible surfaces. Combustible surfaces include floors, furniture, and walls of plaster, drywall or paneling. The proper distance from these combustible surfaces is determined by consulting three sources. If the stove is "listed," which means it was safety tested by an independent testing lab, there will be manufacturer's recommendations for clearance from combustibles.

If a stove is not listed, follow the National Fire Protection Association recommendations (see Table 1) for clearance from combustibles. However, either of these recommendations are superseded by local building codes. Check with the local building inspector to find out what clearance standards are enforced in your area. "

AND ALSO See Figure: #1

I italicized the above section.(I am concerned about).. and in viewing figure one..... there are no considerations
being presented for what is behind the 1" non-combustible spacers which are attached to the combustible surface.

(We can only assume Combustibles)

My question is not one of distances from combustibles... That is very clearly explained... and shown in Table one.......
The question is...... Treatment of these combustibles.....
(AND HERE..... I see this :::: prepare the area properly to ensure there is adequate clearance from any combustible surfaces. )

That is all........

I hope this clarifies my concerns.........

Basically: Exposed wood is my concern... this is what will be behind my shield.......
and with respect of reduction of clearances........
The reduction with the use of 1/4" durock is to 18"(my distance away will be greater than 18")

The idea is that my shield will hang on metal stud.(following venting and spacing guidelines for proper air circulation of heat shield)
Durock will be 1/2" thick.... and possibly have a ceramic tile adhered to it.
using "BaseStep" by UGL-Boral (Durock complimentary product for taping joints adhering tile)

Thanks, Soup
I don't understand your question at all. With a heat sheild of non-combustible material spaced an inch off the wall with non-combustible spacers atleast an inch air gap top and bottom you get a 2/3 reduction in clearance for an unlisted stove. So it would be 12" to the combustibles.
 

Soup

New Member
Sep 27, 2020
30
Where it gets cold
Basically: Exposed wood is my concern... this is what will be behind my shield.......
and with respect of reduction of clearances........
The reduction with the use of 1/4" durock is to 18"(my distance away will be greater than 18")

My question is not one of distances from combustibles... That is very (They) clearly explained... and shown in Table one.......
The question is...... Treatment of these combustibles.....


should be concerned what my combustibles are........(it's not flammables or anything like that...)

It is just exposed wood........(it is not sheetrocked) that is what is behind my shield

AND
what about the shield being 1/2" instead of 1/4".... and having tile.... on it......??
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
25,484
central pa
Basically: Exposed wood is my concern... this is what will be behind my shield.......
and with respect of reduction of clearances........
The reduction with the use of 1/4" durock is to 18"(my distance away will be greater than 18")

My question is not one of distances from combustibles... That is very (They) clearly explained... and shown in Table one.......
The question is...... Treatment of these combustibles.....


should be concerned what my combustibles are........(it's not flammables or anything like that...)

It is just exposed wood........(it is not sheetrocked) that is what is behind my shield

AND
what about the shield being 1/2" instead of 1/4".... and having tile.... on it......??
It doesn't matter what the combustible material is combustibles are combustibles they are all treated the same. And 1/2" or 1/4" doesn't matter either. It can just be a thin piece of sheet metal as well