Scraping & Sanding

thewoodlands

Minister of Fire
Aug 25, 2009
12,968
Foothills of The Adirondacks
I plan on scraping and sanding the outside porch handrails and spindles. After scraping I plan on sanding with a sandpaper grit between 80 to 150, after I'm done would it be best just to wipe them down with a clean rag or should I also vacuum them or is there a better way to clean them before painting.

Thanks
Mike
 

johneh

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2009
2,785
Eastern Ontario
Scraping and sanding by hand with 150 paper should be good
If you have a compressor blow it off then wipe down (water) with a damp rag
allow to dry should take less than an hour paint
better you than me I hate painting
 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,212
Downeast Maine
I like to clean wood with TSP before I paint or prime, but a damp rag should be fine for removing the dust.
 
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thewoodlands

Minister of Fire
Aug 25, 2009
12,968
Foothills of The Adirondacks
I like to clean wood with TSP before I paint or prime, but a damp rag should be fine for removing the dust.
I'll stay away from TSP because of the cons on the list.
 
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Montanalocal

Feeling the Heat
Dec 22, 2014
377
Helena MT
If you are going to go to all that work then your very best bet is to repaint with Swedish linseed oil paint. It is permanent, you will never have to scrape or repaint again for 50 years. I would never paint with anything else, but you have to start with bare wood like in your case. Go to their web site and spend some time reading.

 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,212
Downeast Maine
I'll stay away from TSP because of the cons on the list.
Thanks for the link, didn't know how bad it was for the environment. Last time I got phosphate free TSP brand cleaner and today I learned that it's basically the same thing as simple green.
 
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John Galt

Member
Oct 22, 2019
43
W Montana
Professional way:
Wash, scrape, sand everything to a feathered edge rescraping as needed to remove any paint found while sanding, blow off dust with an air compressor or even a leaf blower, wipe everything down with a very slightly damp rag rinsing frequently, prime at least the bare wood but depending on how much is needed you can prime everything, fill any spots with exterior spackling, sand those spots smooth, spot prime those areas, sand everything lightly to remove standing grains of wood, blow off dust and wipe down with the clean rag just like above. That should take about 85% of the time for the entire project. Two coats of paint and it'll look new.
Don't fall for the hype of primer and paint all in one, you still have to put on two to three coats if you follow the instructions.

You can just wash, scrape, sand quickly, clean as above and then paint. It will look ok. The results will not be as nice and it won't last as long but the time needed will be cut in half.
 

thewoodlands

Minister of Fire
Aug 25, 2009
12,968
Foothills of The Adirondacks
I did scrape,sand, take the air compressor to it and wipe it down with a damp rag and then repeated the process. If I have primer I'll use it but I won't make a special run into town unless I need more sandpaper for the Ridgid 5 inch orbital and the Ryobi 3 inch triangle sander, if I go for the above then I'll pick some up.

I have the front porch that will need painting before fall so I should make a trip. I'll start painting on Thursday and finish it by or on Saturday.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,212
Downeast Maine
I did scrape,sand, take the air compressor to it and wipe it down with a damp rag and then repeated the process. If I have primer I'll use it but I won't make a special run into town unless I need more sandpaper for the Ridgid 5 inch orbital and the Ryobi 3 inch triangle sander, if I go for the above then I'll pick some up.

I have the front porch that will need painting before fall so I should make a trip. I'll start painting on Thursday and finish it by or on Saturday.
Primer is totally worth it, especially a good outdoor primer.
 
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Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
1,147
Northern Maine
I freaking hate painting and I don't do it. My deck is mahogany weathered to a natural silver and it has stainless steel cables.
 

MTY

Feeling the Heat
Jan 9, 2019
345
Idaho
I have been having a few peaceful months. First I mudded, then I primed, then I textured and now I am painting. I used 20 gallons of pva primer, and am at the 20 gallon mark for paint with about 15 gallons to go. One coat on primer and two for paint.

Life is great. Kitchen cabinets and bath vanities arrive on Monday. I took a break between priming and texturing to build the deck and heat up the 400 amp meter base. I have power inside now. 200 amps to the house, with a separate 200 amp breaker reserved for the future shop. I'll most likely order flooring tomorrow.