Show us yours! Wood shed

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JP11

Minister of Fire
May 15, 2011
1,452
Central Maine
I've been using the term 'toy barn'

Hoping to fit in 20 or 30 pallets around the outside edges. that's the theory anyway. Going to start looking for some pallet racking. Idea is for racks above a row of firewood. Eithe for another rack of pallets, or some off season tractor implements.

we'll see.

JP
 
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glennm

Burning Hunk
Dec 26, 2010
192
S Ontario
Hey Kenster

I would want the roof ribs running the correct way for a couple of reasons. Drainage and prevent leaks. The roof will hold some snow and water, the holes where you screw it down could drip and that will rot your wood. I made my first shed the way you are suggesting and had lots of trouble. It is very easy to cut the steel, I think you will be pleased you did it?
 
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jaychino415

Member
Jan 31, 2013
174
san bruno, ca
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cwitham

Member
Oct 29, 2012
90
Central Indiana
I have only basic carpentry skills and I'm a big believer in keeping my wood/heating expenses to a minimum. I've always kept my stacks out on the edge of our woods. They get plenty of hot wind during our summers, plus afternoon sun, but the stacks are under trees and get really messy with leaves and other debris, which hold moisture and causes some minor rot. So...I'd like to build a shed that I can move seasoned wood into, leaving green wood out in the open for a couple of years.

I'd like to use materials that I have around the property. We just had our large home reroofed after a Springtime hail storm. The old, and new, roofs are metal.
I have a great deal of the old metal panels that I kept. The panels are all 20 feet long. I will, therefore, make the shed about 20 feet wide so I don't have to cut the panels to length. This will mean that the ribs of the metal panels will lie side to side, rather than front to back, so I will need to have a slight tilt to left or right for a bit of drainage. No big deal. I have enough of these 20 ft panels to make the shed 12x15 feet deep. That's much larger than what I need for firewood so it will give me storage space to get some of my tractor implements under cover.

I have several 12 foot 2x6 planks (treated). I have a dozen or so landscaping timbers that I could use for uprights but I'm thinking treated 4x4s might be better (and would have to be purcha$ed). I've got a bunch of about 4 inch diameter cedar poles that could be used for the supports for the roof. I also have around 80 or so 18 inch and 30 inch 2x4 pieces that were used for packaging the new roofing panels. I can use these 2x4 pieces to frame the roof, and maybe use them to frame the sides.

I'm a big fan of deck blocks, having built several decks using them. So, I'll probably go that route rather than pouring cement for the support beams, and will use pallets for the floor.

The space I have in mind is on the edge of the tree line behind our house. There is a large dead oak there that I want to take down anyway. To do that, I'll have to clear out a large area of scrub oak so that I can safely access the tree. That's going to leave a large, open space once I'm done. Why not put the shed there? Easy access. Will get lots of sun and strong westerly winds. And it will meet the Bride's rule of keeping the wood out of view from the house. I'll probably need to hang a tarp in the front, at least during burn season, since it will be facing west and could have a lot of rain blown in.

Shouldn't cost me much of anything, 'cept maybe for some 4x4 posts. It won't be as fancy as some in this thread but it should do the job with little expense.

What do you think?
I too think you should cut these and install them correctly, I cut all of my metal with an angle grinder with a cutoff wheel type disc on it.
 

McKraut

Feeling the Heat
Sep 1, 2011
274
South Central PA
I too think you should cut these and install them correctly, I cut all of my metal with an angle grinder with a cutoff wheel type disc on it.
I totally agree. If you're gonna build it, build it right. Cutting metal roofing is fairly easily. I used an abrasive blade in my circular saw when I built my shed. I just stacked the sheets on top of each other and sawed right through them. Good luck with your shed. You will be glad you built it.

Bob
 
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raybonz

Minister of Fire
Feb 5, 2008
6,208
Carver, MA.

TOGO FISHER

New Member
Dec 18, 2013
2
Togo Minnesota
Love your wood shelter! Looks great with all the cedar log slabs.. How expensive was it to build a shelter like that?

Ray
I cut the logs from my property and bought the slab wood for 30 bucks from a local one man lumber mill. The steel for the roof was recycled and so it ended up more sweat than money.

As usual its not big enough - !

Thanks for taking a look as it.
 
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raybonz

Minister of Fire
Feb 5, 2008
6,208
Carver, MA.
I cut the logs from my property and bought the slab wood for 30 bucks from a local one man lumber mill. The steel for the roof was recycled and so it ended up more sweat than money.

As usual its not big enough - !

Thanks for taking a look as it.
Love it! For that kind of money you could expand.. The rustic looks of the shelter makes it blend into a wooded area nicely and you can't touch what it cost you either..
 

Lance

Member
May 18, 2012
37
Western Wisconsin
Started with just the stacks out back, then built the lean closest to the house. Don't have to carry very far to the stove in the house. Next on list is to add boards with air space between to keep snow and rain out, but still let air pass thru.
IMG_1405.JPG IMG_1407.JPG IMG_1409.JPG
 

raybonz

Minister of Fire
Feb 5, 2008
6,208
Carver, MA.
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firefighterjake

Minister of Fire
Jul 22, 2008
19,028
Unity/Bangor, Maine
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raybonz

Minister of Fire
Feb 5, 2008
6,208
Carver, MA.
I like it . . . cheap, practical and it looks good. Liking the rustic look.
Totally impressed that this was built for around the price of good tarps which are worth little.. This might be my favorite cost effective shelter yet!

Ray
 

Gasifier

Minister of Fire
Apr 25, 2011
3,191
St. Lawrence River Valley, N.Y.
_g Wo, wo, Wow. Nice reddogtrkr. Nice
 

albert1029

Feeling the Heat
Nov 15, 2011
398
Southwestern PA
has the look of a vintage shed like grandpa had....awesome...
 

bassJAM

Feeling the Heat
Jun 5, 2012
478
Cincinnati OH
After realizing the wood I've stored in my detached garage hasn't dried very much in the past year and a half, I'm trying a different approach for 2015-16. Just finished the roof with the help of my gf over the weekend. I'm very impressed with how solid these are. I was concerned my first attempt at standing rows would be blown over by a storm so I took them down, but I can walk on top of this thing!
IMG_20140114_143810_837_zps1f3e8248.jpg IMG_20140114_132620_627_zps6f3cf078.jpg
 
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Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
15,302
Philadelphia
Beautiful stacks! However, I've never seen reports on how well Holzhausen dry versus traditional covered stacks, in the same location. I may be surprised, but it always looks to me like there must be a lot of wood in the center that might not dry so well, particularly if leaves and other debris get jammed up in the hausen over the course of a few years' drying time.
 

Gasifier

Minister of Fire
Apr 25, 2011
3,191
St. Lawrence River Valley, N.Y.
After realizing the wood I've stored in my detached garage hasn't dried very much in the past year and a half, I'm trying a different approach for 2015-16. Just finished the roof with the help of my gf over the weekend. I'm very impressed with how solid these are. I was concerned my first attempt at standing rows would be blown over by a storm so I took them down, but I can walk on top of this thing!



I will bet your wood will dry better like that OUTSIDE than it did in regular stacks INSIDE. Nice work.
 
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bassJAM

Feeling the Heat
Jun 5, 2012
478
Cincinnati OH
Thanks for the compliments! Most of the wood in the inside if this particular Holzhausen is ash, so I'm not as concerned about it fully drying out. I also didn't stack the wood inside of it, I just tossed it in so there's more open space which hopefully will lead to as much airflow as possible. Regardless, it will be world's better than having the wood inside my shed like Gasifier mentioned. Just about the time I finished stacking 6 cords in there, I realized it was probably a bad idea.
 
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