Show us yours! Wood shed

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raybonz

Minister of Fire
Feb 5, 2008
6,208
Carver, MA.
here is my woodshed..romantic
Cool firewood hoop james! It would be cool if you could dry that hollow log out and use it indoors! Maybe seal it with poly and use 2 smaller logs secured to the bottom right and left to keep it stable..

Ray
 

tim1

Member
Here is my latest shed. Plastic pallets on bottom with marine plywood on top. Holds about 6 cord. Full now. Tim
DSC00026.JPG
 
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raybonz

Minister of Fire
Feb 5, 2008
6,208
Carver, MA.
Here is my latest shed. Plastic pallets on bottom with marine plywood on top. Holds about 6 cord. Full now. Tim View attachment 124389
I'd forgo the plywood to enhance air circulation myself.. Wish I could get plastic pallets here! We use them at work but aren't allowed to take anything..
 

Berner

Feeling the Heat
Feb 1, 2012
388
Eastern, MA
Never had the luxury of a shed but looking to build one soon. Tarps are getting old quick. Do you guys season your wood stacked in a field somewhere before moving it into your shed? Or do you cut split and stack it into your shed from day one? I'm sure everyone's different and depends on a lot of things (wood species, burning habits, temperature, sun, wind direction etc) but what's the norm?

Here's my scenario. I'm figuring to burn 5 cords a year with outdoor fires, friends picking at the stack etc. At all given points I would like at least a three year supply on hand with some extra room for comfort. If this were you would you build a shed that holds all 15 cords, 5 cords or somewhere in between? I know in my heart I want the biggest shed possible but living on .57 acres space is fairly limited.

By the way this is my favorite thread. I find myself re-reading it atleast once a week.
 

Gasifier

Minister of Fire
Apr 25, 2011
3,191
St. Lawrence River Valley, N.Y.
Berner,

You could build a shed that will hold one year supply. Then stack any more wood you build up on pallets and do not cover it. If it is for the following year it doesn't need to be covered.

And tell your friends that "pick at it" to give you a hand occasionally. ;lol
 

Berner

Feeling the Heat
Feb 1, 2012
388
Eastern, MA
Berner,

You could build a shed that will hold one year supply. Then stack any more wood you build up on pallets and do not cover it. If it is for the following year it doesn't need to be covered.

And tell your friends that "pick at it" to give you a hand occasionally. ;lol
In all fairness he does usually bring grass fed steaks in exchange, which are delicious. I think I'm making out pretty good in that deal.

I would like to build a shed that holds at least one seasons worth of wood. I just might regret not going bigger. I will probably end up splitting it with 7-8 cords in the shed with another 7 or 8 outside.

Just trying to maximize flexibility and efficiency.
 

raybonz

Minister of Fire
Feb 5, 2008
6,208
Carver, MA.
Never had the luxury of a shed but looking to build one soon. Tarps are getting old quick. Do you guys season your wood stacked in a field somewhere before moving it into your shed? Or do you cut split and stack it into your shed from day one? I'm sure everyone's different and depends on a lot of things (wood species, burning habits, temperature, sun, wind direction etc) but what's the norm?

Here's my scenario. I'm figuring to burn 5 cords a year with outdoor fires, friends picking at the stack etc. At all given points I would like at least a three year supply on hand with some extra room for comfort. If this were you would you build a shed that holds all 15 cords, 5 cords or somewhere in between? I know in my heart I want the biggest shed possible but living on .57 acres space is fairly limited.

By the way this is my favorite thread. I find myself re-reading it atleast once a week.
I agree with gasman.. Build it big enough to hold a year's worth and a bit extra.. I keep 2 years worth and then some outside stacked on pallets here then move it into the shelter in the spring.. I also keep the snowblower, electric log splitter and some other stuff in the shelter.. Love having a shelter!

Ray
 

bsruther

Minister of Fire
Oct 28, 2008
889
Northern Kentucky
I stack all of my split wood behind the detached garages. The white awning used to be on the side of the garage, but I moved it to the back when I extended the garage roof.
The awning rests on a retaining wall and makes for a great breezeway. I'm not sure how much wood I can fit behind both garages, I'm thinking about 10 cords, at least. I usually have 4 cords under there at a time and that only fills about a third of it.
This year, I'm going to try like hell to fill it up and see how much it holds.

004.JPG
 

Gasifier

Minister of Fire
Apr 25, 2011
3,191
St. Lawrence River Valley, N.Y.
Nice looking place there bsruther! What is all that green stuff on the ground? !!!
 
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TreeCo

Member
Feb 4, 2007
35
Good wood storage for seasoning is very important to success with wood heat, IMO. I'm going to post a few photos of our wood shed and wood to the house delivery system. This wood shed is 12ft. wide and 40ft. long. Each bay is 8ft.x 8ft., holding about 3.5 cords in each bay. It takes 25 recycled cement block for each bay. Our wood stoves take 24 inch long wood so the bays and block are laid out to hold 4 rows. We burn a lot of pine and poplar which is trash wood for most folks but our Jotul F600CB likes it fine.

woodshed.jpg

Block detail:

Front Detail.JPG
Here's how the ends and between bays are done. Steel post make up the bottom 24 inch gap as they rot away more slowly than wood.

End detail.JPG

We park this Toyota 'wood wagon' at the back door as the wood shed is about 600ft. away. That is an inverted truck bed liner on top.

009.JPG 010.JPG

Jotul F600CB///sorry about the typo! This is our Jotul F3CB.

Jotul%203CB.jpg
 
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Gasifier

Minister of Fire
Apr 25, 2011
3,191
St. Lawrence River Valley, N.Y.
Good wood storage for seasoning is very important to success with wood heat, IMO. I'm going to post a few photos of our wood shed and wood to the house delivery system. This wood shed is 12ft. wide and 40ft. long. Each bay is 8ft.x 8ft., holding about 3.5 cords in each bay. It takes 25 recycled cement block for each bay. Our wood stoves take 24 inch long wood so the bays and block are laid out to hold 4 rows. We burn a lot of pine and poplar which is trash wood for most folks but our Jotul F600CB likes it fine.

View attachment 126189

Block detail:

View attachment 126190



Here's how the ends and between bays are done. Steel post make up the bottom 24 inch gap as they rot away more slowly than wood.

View attachment 126191

We park this Toyota 'wood wagon' at the back door as the wood shed is about 600ft. away. That is an inverted truck bed liner on top.

View attachment 126192

View attachment 126193

Jotul F600CB

View attachment 126194
Cool! Is there a "really like" button?
 
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Gasifier

Minister of Fire
Apr 25, 2011
3,191
St. Lawrence River Valley, N.Y.
I like the use of the blocks. I have a bunch of those. I have been thinking of building wood "bins" with pallets so I can move them around with the Bobcat B300 loader backhoe. But the machine is so heavy I would be limited to when I could move and where without making ruts. So a covered trailer may be a better answer. Lots of options out there. Thanks for posting. Now ya got me thinking in a different direction. ;hm Here we go again. ;lol
 
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mcmoonter

New Member
Feb 23, 2014
1
Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland
I've just found this site. I started off with off cuts from a nearby sawmill and clearing our own windblown trees. I then made a hydraulic log splitter and found a sustainable source of wood. I made a couple of sheds then had a bash at building some Holz Hausens. http://www.petermclarenfineart.com/Blog/Holz-Hausens . It's good to see so many other enthusiasts out there. Feels immediately at home.

Woodpile Oct 2010 002.JPG May Day 2010 001.JPG Wood pile 003.JPG DSC_0005-003.JPG
 
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raybonz

Minister of Fire
Feb 5, 2008
6,208
Carver, MA.
I've just found this site. I started off with off cuts from a nearby sawmill and clearing our own windblown trees. I then made a hydraulic log splitter and found a sustainable source of wood. I made a couple of sheds then had a bash at building some Holz Hausens. http://www.petermclarenfineart.com/Blog/Holz-Hausens . It's good to see so many other enthusiasts out there. Feels immediately at home.
Wow that is very impressive!
 
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Gasifier

Minister of Fire
Apr 25, 2011
3,191
St. Lawrence River Valley, N.Y.
Hey. Welcome Mcmoonter. That looks like a lot of wood all cut/split/stacked! Nice. How big of a place do you heat? Sq. ft.? What do you burn the wood in? Stove? Boiler? How is your heat emitted or dispersed?
 

ryjen

Burning Hunk
Feb 2, 2014
155
north carolina
That is indeed impressive. I, personally, would not have the time to make my sheds/stacks present that well. In that group of pictures we have the stacking method of Holt-hauzens, and then very geometrically eye pleasing stacks in the sheds themselves. Then, as if to ad insult to the "you have shed envy" injury, he strategically places a couple of hand saws, and some saw bucks in an effort to tell you, or make you think, that it was all done by hand. Probably by a man who makes Paul Bunyon and Babe look like Sherman and Peabody.
 

JP11

Minister of Fire
May 15, 2011
1,452
Central Maine
Almost done! doors are in now. metal ceiling going in this week while I'm away.

This was the 'poor man's' aerial pic from the man lift.

JP
photo 3.JPG
 
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bmblank

Minister of Fire
Jan 17, 2013
698
Michigan
I like your tractor.
 

JP11

Minister of Fire
May 15, 2011
1,452
Central Maine
LOL.. so do I. Near best money I've ever spent. wish I had that fancy thing like my buddy's bobcat, so I could change front implements without getting off it. I seem to swap amongst forks, bucket, and power angle snowplow a fair amount.

Anxious for them to finish the interior (minus attic insulation and the overhead radiant heat) so I can get my pallet racking in there and unload and get rid of that damn box trailer. It was great temporary storage for 2k bucks. I braced the ceiling so it wouldn't hold ice in winter. I ran lights in it, and had receptacles and water too. But after 5 plus years of looking at it out the window.. I'll score some points with the wife by getting rid of it!

JP
 

Roundgunner

Feeling the Heat
Nov 26, 2013
320
Rural CT
I made this shed in a hurry and it is still not finished.

IMAG0385_zps4530dfc2.jpg

I wish it was bigger and I will probably add on to this instead of another free standing, not sure yet.

IMAG0386_zps00c987c8.jpg IMAG0388_zps618e833a.jpg

My stack will go about 6.5 to 7 foot high by 9 feet long with 24” wood. I like the clear roof and will most likely use it for the step too.
 

8686

New Member
Jan 21, 2014
87
Long Island, ny
Hey, I know this thread is a bit old. I was just wondering about stacking technique. When people stack their wood like a log cabin to allow air to circulate all around, do you find that it dries quicker? I have read that wood dries from their ends, if this is true doesn't it make this stacking technique useless? I am curious (and new to stacking wood). I have seen most people stack their wood like the picture above.

I have seen many great looking wood sheds here! Many of them are blocking the wood from the sun. Does it help dry the wood faster if direct sunlight hit the wood stacks?
 
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