Solar and power wall 3 quote.

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Design will be

Duke is offering $5400 for a battery install and then onto that you can get $52 a month.

Here is the rider that you must use for 24 months. Basically there is a $0.67 per kw name plate grids access fee and a 28$ minimum bill that is not offset by credits. Net metering is done per TOU period. Excess power it credited at $0.034 per kWh.

Sooo… read on if you want. It’s more complicated that I have time to really understand right now. I don’t think it should be.

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That is complicated to understand - I got stuck on "name plate grid".

I looked into the Eversource fact page and they will only do this with approved batteries from Enphase, by approved installers (my installer is one of them). It is a 3 year commitment. Also, it is a limited fund, so not everyone will be able to participate and most likely anyone who stops to think about it probably won't be fast enough to get in on it. Well, truthfully I have no idea what the fund amount is, but NH is not big on incentives so sets apart very little for something like this.
 
Eversource was effectively forced into it by the state. NH Electric Coop has been far more progressive on batteries and while the state rules were being made, Eversource got forced into it. I think NHEC even was proposing a Bring Your Own Battery Program (BYOB)that was equipment agnostic, not sure if it happened. The state gets Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (AKA RGGI or "reggy") funding that is supposed to be dedicated to energy efficiency. NH raids a lot of it for other purposes but does fund some energy efficiency programs and I expect the battery program is funded from that.

The reason that Eversource is going with specific equipment and installers is they dont want to mess with the details of getting the system to work. With a BYOB program the utility has to communicate directly to the actual customer and each connection needs to be customized, thats lot of IT and staff time. The Eversource approach is get an intermediate third party to do the dirty work and all Eversource does is communicate to the third party when they want to deploy the home batteries for gird support. I havent kept up Mass but think they have a couple of other equipment vendors.

Eversource is a large behemoth in it for the buck and the only reason they do any energy incentive programs is the state PUC forces them to or dangles a large incentive in front of them. NHEC is Coop, the customers are the owners so they can be more progressive if their customers want them to be.
 
That is complicated to understand - I got stuck on "name plate grid".

I looked into the Eversource fact page and they will only do this with approved batteries from Enphase, by approved installers (my installer is one of them). It is a 3 year commitment. Also, it is a limited fund, so not everyone will be able to participate and most likely anyone who stops to think about it probably won't be fast enough to get in on it. Well, truthfully I have no idea what the fund amount is, but NH is not big on incentives so sets apart very little for something like this.
We have to get utility approval to install. The nameplate capacity is just the system size on the application to Duke.

Power when up on my last bill. Now at 16.7 cents per kWh on 1150 kWh. Shortening that ROI time!