Sometimes there are exceptions to keeping the connection from the stove to the chimney short

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peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Hearth Supporter
Jul 11, 2008
8,906
Northern NH
I went to a memorial service today to an old meeting house/church near Montpelier VT. The building was being heated with these two stoves. Looked like single wall pipe screwed at the joints except for the joints at the chimney. Visually there were high and low spots in the horizontal runs. They were burning oak. One stove was a Glenwood, I did not get the name of the other but it was a similar vintage. The stack is the last large column at the end of the room. There were a few creosote stains under the connections at each side of the stack but very minimal. The building is 201 years old.

I think getting a fire started must be system. I once saw something similar and there was woodstove in the basement that was used to get the draft going and the other pipes hooked to the same flue could be started.

Every one of the pews are made with full width pine boards, no joints) and look like they have been there awhile.

Sometimes there are exceptions to keeping the connection from the stove to the chimney short Sometimes there are exceptions to keeping the connection from the stove to the chimney short
 
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So they use the single wall pipe (and the no baffle stoves putting a lot of heat in the pipes) to heat ...

Imagine cleaning that flue...
 
I was sitting in the back row quite close to the stack connection and it was quite neat on the floor despite having what I thought was clean out connector right above. I guess over the years they must have a well developed system to clean everything. I saw no signs of a backup heating system.
 
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I saw something similar in an old church at Old World Wisconsin. I have been there in the winter and they run the stove during cold weather. It is the oldest church in Wisconsin.

I did not take this picture. I borrowed it from this article:


Sometimes there are exceptions to keeping the connection from the stove to the chimney short
 
The church was sitting on a stacked slate foundation (no mortar) so my guess is the basement temp is outdoor temp in the winter. There were no restrooms or water in the building, but they had a nearby more modern community center next door.
 
Wonder how many people got their coats or nickers singed on that over the years?
 
Pretty cool.

That's some old school engineering right there. It certainly flies in the face of contemporary thinking.

I heard somewhere "necessity is the mother of invention"
 
It’s amazing those stoves lived with the amount of heat they had to throw for short periods during service. With those high ceilings the rooms certainly were not getting to “room temperature” in any sort of normal period of time. Those stoves must have been running full out in order to keep that pipe hot.
 
They probably don't have cats and leave the wonderful smell of smoke around the place. I love old stoves.
 
What a beautiful space. Simplicity at it's best.
 
Yes. As a woodworker I LOVE the old growth wood. There is nothing like it today.
Yeah look at those floors and how they laid them out! so great.
 
I think i see some registers cut in the floor? maybe they did add some type of furnace in the basement at some point?
 
Yeah look at those floors and how they laid them out! so great.
I just did a fast look and couldn't verify it but I remember "the King's Board". Back in the days before we tossed the Brits every board over 18" (I think) belonged to the King and was shipped back to GB.
 
I think you may be confused with the Kings Pines. Straight defect white pines in the colonies were reserved for King. https://www.mtarboretum.org/articles/2017/3/11/the-kings-pines. The 40" tree I had cut and then I processed into boards had a defects so it would not be considered a King's Pine. White pine weevil is major pest of white pines. https://www.maine.gov/dacf/php/gotpests/bugs/white-pine-weevil.htm#:~:text=White Pine Weevil—Pissodes strobi,the previous year's leading shoot. The lower seventy feet were not impacted but from there to the top around 130 feet there were numerous defects from weevils killing the leader. There was also some ant damage. It also was not straight. I still got some nice boards out of it.

Sometimes there are exceptions to keeping the connection from the stove to the chimney short Sometimes there are exceptions to keeping the connection from the stove to the chimney short
 
I was just watching a documentary on HMS Victory and her original masts were New England pine.
 
The Pike book, Tall Trees, Tough Men talks about harvesting and moving a mast pine from the woods to the ocean. They would use oxen, lots of them to drag the tree out. They would work them to death and just add more on to the hitch as they went. There are many roads called Mast Road along the New England coast and most got their start as haul road for masts.
 
The North Church and meeting hall in Corwall, CT is like this. No power or facilities, it is candlelit still. I love that the beauty of these buildings is being honored and preserved.

Dig the beautiful floors and timbers in this oldest house in CT.


The second article of the castle on that webpage was just a mile away from where I lived for a bit in Cornwall.
 
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