Stove to liner connection

Rob711

Member
Oct 19, 2017
164
Long Island, ny
1D55A7CE-0F8B-4749-BB32-116A3A2163F9.jpeg 137A9BE8-F58E-4ECE-870F-F991C5C495B6.jpeg
Last yr I used my intrepid I to heat our 950 sq ft home. We’ve extensively renovated adding 1000 sq/ft. And 2nd floor.

I don’t expect the stove to heat entirely but I think it will supplement nicely. Not realizing the advantages to top loading, I purposely pushed the stove deep into the masonry chimney, ran 6” liner and connected via a stainless collar that fit into liner and stove.
I’d like to pull the stove further into room, problem is the liner is already against the cast iron flue assembly. I don’t wanna cut a big chunk outta the 1930 iron. I think the lintel? Is one big piece. I ordered a 30 degree elbow from Rockford, angle was off and really thin gauge. I cut a stainless collar and made a rough template. Waiting on friend to get the correct tungsten to weld stainless. Any thoughts from experts.

I did try exhausting out the back, then stove to too far forward
 
Last edited by a moderator:

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,191
Indiana
Looks like a 45 degree elbow would do the trick. The liner will need to lifted up to make it happen most likely. It certainly looks pretty straight forward.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,377
central pa
Yeah it looks pretty straight forward to me also. A 30 or 45 degree elbow. It looks like your liner may be upside down though.
 

Rob711

Member
Oct 19, 2017
164
Long Island, ny
There’s a direction as to the liner? I purchased that 30. It extended to far beyond the angle. I need it to go inside liner. Really thin gauge too. My original stainless collar was much thicker, I cut maybe 15 degrees angle on it and it was good.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,377
central pa
There’s a direction as to the liner? I purchased that 30. It extended to far beyond the angle. I need it to go inside liner. Really thin gauge too. My original stainless collar was much thicker, I cut maybe 15 degrees angle on it and it was good.
Yes with that type of liner there absolutely is an up and down. The overlap of the inner wall needs to be facing down. It looks like yours is facing up. To check reach in there with a knife or your fingernail. If it can slide between the layers when coming down the liner it is upside down. It you can slide between them going up it is correct. Also your elbow should not slide into the liner the liner should slide into the elbow. That way any condensation running down the liner is directed into the stove instead of onto the top. Like Webby said the liner will need to be pulled up to make the connection. You may also need to do a little trimming of the damper frame or brick.

Yes the elbows are not terribly thick but they are probably at least 3x as thick as that liner. No need to be thicker
 

Rob711

Member
Oct 19, 2017
164
Long Island, ny
D555245D-4F64-4780-9292-C0C1F3E76C0B.jpeg DCB8CC3A-0855-40C8-9FC6-0CC89484C696.jpeg
This backwards liner changes my whole plan. Now I’m thinking I’ll have to rent a cherry picker type of lift. Pull liner, flip, try again. Ugh.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,377
central pa
So how bad is it to run stove with backward liner. I think that’s how it was last year
It traps creosote between the layers of the liner. It can also even direct creosote through the crimped seam to the outside of the liner.
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,191
Indiana
That’s light wall flex, it’s hard to say if it’s upside down. The manufacturer of the brand we use says it doesn’t matter the orientation of the light wall, it definitely matters on heavy flex though.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,377
central pa
That’s light wall flex, it’s hard to say if it’s upside down. The manufacturer of the brand we use says it doesn’t matter the orientation of the light wall, it definitely matters on heavy flex though.
That is 2 ply smooth wall stuff. Not regular light wall. With that there definatly is a top and a bottom.
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,191
Indiana
That is 2 ply smooth wall stuff. Not regular light wall. With that there definatly is a top and a bottom.
Ahh, I’ve never used that stuff..
 

Rob711

Member
Oct 19, 2017
164
Long Island, ny
Thanks guys, I’m going to pull it this weekend. I won’t sleep well until know it’s correct. I’ll let you know how I did. I’m trying to make sure I have everything I’ll need. Don’t wanna waste renting something.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,377
central pa
Thanks guys, I’m going to pull it this weekend. I won’t sleep well until know it’s correct. I’ll let you know how I did. I’m trying to make sure I have everything I’ll need. Don’t wanna waste renting something.
Have you checked to see if it is right?

From the pic I think it is upside down but I can't be sure without being there. Check it before doing anything.
 

Rob711

Member
Oct 19, 2017
164
Long Island, ny
I checked again this am before I left to work. There subtle but definitely ridges if I slide up the liner. Why is this such a terrible product? Is it because of its lack of flexibility? The place I got it from says it’s commercial grade, they told me I could use it for coal if I wanted too! I don’t trust the builder, for my own sanity I’d like to see the entire run of liner.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,377
central pa
I checked again this am before I left to work. There subtle but definitely ridges if I slide up the liner. Why is this such a terrible product? Is it because of its lack of flexibility? The place I got it from says it’s commercial grade, they told me I could use it for coal if I wanted too! I don’t trust the builder, for my own sanity I’d like to see the entire run of liner.
That would not last more than 5 years with coal. You need to see which direction you can slide between those inner flaps. If the un attached edge of those flaps is facing up it will allow dirt and condensation between the layers.

I don't like that type because it is by far the least durable type of liner on the market.