Transplanted Southerner Trying to Figure Out Wood Stove Insert

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bulletpruf

New Member
Oct 16, 2021
7
Northern Virginia
I'm in a rental house and it has a wood stove insert. I think it's a Treemont by Vansco. Anyway, we just had a cold front push through in Northern Virginia and I plan to start using it.

Tried to find an owner's manual, but only managed to download a virus on my Mac.

Anyway, the fan/blower works fine, and everything else seems to be in good shape, but I'm a bit confused about how everything else works.

The three levers on the bottom appear to be air intakes, right?

And then there are the two levers on the front top -- one of them opens some sort of baffle about 2" or so. I can't tell what the other one does.

Anyone have any input?

Thanks!

Scott

IMG_7226.jpg IMG_7227.jpg IMG_7228.jpg IMG_7229.jpg IMG_7230.jpg IMG_7231.jpg
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,076
central pa
I'm in a rental house and it has a wood stove insert. I think it's a Treemont by Vansco. Anyway, we just had a cold front push through in Northern Virginia and I plan to start using it.

Tried to find an owner's manual, but only managed to download a virus on my Mac.

Anyway, the fan/blower works fine, and everything else seems to be in good shape, but I'm a bit confused about how everything else works.

The three levers on the bottom appear to be air intakes, right?

And then there are the two levers on the front top -- one of them opens some sort of baffle about 2" or so. I can't tell what the other one does.

Anyone have any input?

Thanks!

Scott

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The first thing to do is to see if the insert is hooked to a liner that runs out the top of the chimney
 
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bulletpruf

New Member
Oct 16, 2021
7
Northern Virginia
The first thing to do is to see if the insert is hooked to a liner that runs out the top of the chimney

I know it's been used frequently in the past. If so, wouldn't that mean it's hooked up to something that goes out the chimney?

If not, how does one check to see if it's hooked to a liner? Do I have to remove the nuts on the sides and top of the insert?

Thanks

Scott
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,076
central pa
I know it's been used frequently in the past. If so, wouldn't that mean it's hooked up to something that goes out the chimney?

If not, how does one check to see if it's hooked to a liner? Do I have to remove the nuts on the sides and top of the insert?

Thanks

Scott
It absolutely does not mean that. Inserts like these were typically installed by just sliding them into the fireplace. No connection at all. This was found to be very dangerous and is no longer allowed. It should all be checked out by a chimney professional for safety
 
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bulletpruf

New Member
Oct 16, 2021
7
Northern Virginia
It absolutely does not mean that. Inserts like these were typically installed by just sliding them into the fireplace. No connection at all. This was found to be very dangerous and is no longer allowed. It should all be checked out by a chimney professional for safety

Gotcha. Why is it dangerous? CO2 leaking inside? Fire hazard? Both?

Can't I check this out myself? I'm handy, but just not familiar with fireplace inserts.

Thanks
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,076
central pa
Gotcha. Why is it dangerous? CO2 leaking inside? Fire hazard? Both?

Can't I check this out myself? I'm handy, but just not familiar with fireplace inserts.

Thanks
Both.

And if you know how to inspect everything for safety then yes you could.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,076
central pa
Ok, can I get a clue as to how to do this?

Thanks
Check to see if it is lined put a camera in to check the condition of the liner check for required clearances check condition of the stove check for proper hearth protection etc.
 
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coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,341
NE PA
Gotcha. Why is it dangerous? CO2 leaking inside? Fire hazard? Both?

Can't I check this out myself? I'm handy, but just not familiar with fireplace inserts.

Thanks
The flue diameter is much larger for a fireplace. When a firebox with a smaller outlet which is much more efficient than open burning is added, the flue diameter needs to be the same size as the Insert or stove outlet.

When a larger flue is used the hot exhaust gasses expand into the larger area inside chimney. This allows the gasses to cool as they expand. Cooling of the rising gasses creates creosote which can form rapidly. So it is a fire hazard creating creosote.

Knowing others have used it without possibly knowing how hot the chimney flue needs to be could cause creosote formation already there that needs to be inspected.
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,341
NE PA
The basics are water vapor from combustion rises up the chimney with exhaust gasses and unburned smoke particles. If the inner flue temp is below 250*f before it exits the top, the water vapor condenses on flue walls allowing smoke particles to stick. This is creosote formation.
An insulated liner the same size of Insert outlet is now required the entire height of chimney flue to stay hotter and prevent creosote.

The 250* temp is required to the top while smoke is present. During the coaling stage it can drop since no smoke particles are present to form creosote. Burning slow or choking off the air to prolong a fire lowers flue temp creating creosote.
 
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coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,341
NE PA
By removing the upper faceplate cover you can see the top of Insert. If there is an opening allowing all exhaust to expand and rise up the existing flue, it was called a slammer. A quick install using the original flue. They became bad news and have been outlawed. There should be a stainless steel pipe connected to Insert extending up chimney. Depending on clearance to framing members this liner may need to be insulated as well. Any insulated liner stays hotter to the top allowing you to use less wood, and stay cleaner. So insulated liners are recommended. Also check the top like you would any chimney for creosote formation. Chimney cleaning is no different than a wood stove unless there is no liner. In that case the entire Insert needs to be removed to remove creosote and debris that falls down flue during cleaning. A liner allows debris to fall into Insert without removal each time chimney is cleaned.
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,076
central pa

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,341
NE PA
Oof, I can smell that one from here.
 

bulletpruf

New Member
Oct 16, 2021
7
Northern Virginia
Ok, I vacuumed out the mess from in/around/on the insert and put stuff back together.

I did verify that the top right knob operates the damper. If you pull the knob it opens it.

The top middle knob has me stumped. It moves a flap or door or some contraption that's attached to the roof of the insert on the top. It's the circled part in the picture. Any thoughts on what this is?

Thanks

IMG_7231.jpg
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,341
NE PA
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bulletpruf

New Member
Oct 16, 2021
7
Northern Virginia
Is this the size of the opening a catalytic combustor would fit?

The opening is 16" x 1" and it's immediately below the stove top. I'm thinking it's used to help the stove top heat up.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,456
South Puget Sound, WA
Ok, I vacuumed out the mess from in/around/on the insert and put stuff back together.
The liner needs to be removed and the chimney thoroughly cleaned of creosote. If the creosote ignites inside of the chimney due to contact with a hot liner, it is going to be very hard to put out.
 
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