Tulikivi Quote

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Todd

Minister of Fire
Hearth Supporter
Nov 19, 2005
10,388
NW Wisconsin

Been looking into these lately and was curious on total costs to put one in the corner of my cabin. Turns out the heater is $15k shipped and installation is another 5k.

According to the dealer it has to be put together and installed by them as per Tulikivi orders. I thought you could put these things together yourself, guess not? I would also have to beef up the floor at my own cost.

No way I can justify the cost of one of these! $20k can buy a lot of firewood or propane lol. They do qualify for the Fed tax credit.
 
I would say that’s better to place in a house that’s built on a slab or a basement install. That’s a serious amount of weight!
 
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I did not go with Tulikivi when I had mine built but rather hired a mason that was certified as part of the masonry heater association (don’t recall exactly the name). Back then in 2009, my cost was about $16k for the concrete block support from basement floor to main floor, build of the masonry heater and chimney out through roof and which was not very high as the house as a craftsman ranch so one main floor. It was built as part of us building the house which was a custom build using SIP’s. My brother and I built the house together with contractors for HVAC, plumbing and electric.

Would do it again in a heartbeat.
 
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Yeah heavy and that’s a small one. Looking back I should have got one 4 years ago when I built this place. The other day the wife said she missed her old soapstone stove so I said what about this one! Lol I told her I’d keep an eye out for a Woodstock deal.
 
I did not go with Tulikivi when I had mine built but rather hired a mason that was certified as part of the masonry heater association (don’t recall exactly the name). Back then in 2009, my cost was about $16k for the concrete block support from basement floor to main floor, build of the masonry heater and chimney out through roof and which was not very high as the house as a craftsman ranch so one main floor. It was built as part of us building the house which was a custom build using SIP’s. My brother and I built the house together with contractors for HVAC, plumbing and electric.

Would do it again in a heartbeat.
How well did yours heat? How does it compare to a wood stove?
 
How well did yours heat? How does it compare to a wood stove?
It heated the whole house and we hardly ever had the central air on. Nice steady heat all day long. Two fires on the real cold days.
 
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Been looking into these lately and was curious on total costs to put one in the corner of my cabin. Turns out the heater is $15k shipped and installation is another 5k.

According to the dealer it has to be put together and installed by them as per Tulikivi orders. I thought you could put these things together yourself, guess not? I would also have to beef up the floor at my own cost.

No way I can justify the cost of one of these! $20k can buy a lot of firewood or propane lol. They do qualify for the Fed tax credit.
And that is before the foundation prep to support the weight.

A TempCast masonry stove can be DIY. Basic unit is around $8K.
 
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And that is before the foundation prep to support the weight.

A TempCast masonry stove can be DIY. Basic unit is around $8K.
I think we went with TempCast but then one needs to have mason skills to make it look nice.
 
I think we went with TempCast but then one needs to have mason skills to make it look nice.
Yes, though one could put on cultured stone veneer with a bit of sweat equity.
 
I also looked into the Tempcast and they required me to cut a hole in my floor and build a block foundation and slab for it. The Tulikivi just requires floor bracing and some kind of insulation pad.
 
These are pretty cool. I talked to a dealer in Minneapolis and he has one in his home, fires it twice per day. The big ones are $8-10k and weigh 1000 lbs. looks pretty simple to put together.
 
These are pretty cool. I talked to a dealer in Minneapolis and he has one in his home, fires it twice per day. The big ones are $8-10k and weigh 1000 lbs. looks pretty simple to put
These are pretty cool. I talked to a dealer in Minneapolis and he has one in his home, fires it twice per day. The big ones are $8-10k and weigh 1000 lbs. looks pretty simple to put together.
Those are nice! I would install one.
 
Yeah I thought they were very interesting. Each top section has its own baffle or bell opposite of the prior section that slows down the heat letting it soak into the mass. It also run wide open like any other masonry heater but also has secondary burn in the fire box. Looks pretty easy to put together and take apart if needed.
 
So I was looking into these and was thinking. I guess you don’t have to worry about chimney fires since they burn so hot it burns all the smoke?
 
So I was looking into these and was thinking. I guess you don’t have to worry about chimney fires since they burn so hot it burns all the smoke?
Yeah they just burn wide open and as long as you burn dry wood temps reach over 1500 degrees and burn all the nasties that make creosote.
 
If I ever do a new construction home I will 100% be putting one of these bad boys in. They are really cool.

@KDubU how long would it take to heat the house? I saw that that the surface doesn’t get much more than 160*, I feel like compared to a 500* woodstove it would take a lot longer.
 
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If I ever do a new construction home I will 100% be putting one of these bad boys in. They are really cool.

@KDubU how long would it take to heat the house? I saw that that the surface doesn’t get much more than 160*, I feel like compared to a 500* woodstove it would take a lot longer.
It takes a while for the mass to warm up but once it’s going it just holds it and yes, you can put your hands, feet, body, etc against it and it’s just really comfortable heat. Great with kids and pets too. The only place that gets super hot are the front doors and pizza oven as those are steel. If I recall correctly two days of fires (basically one fire a day) and she is up to temp.
 
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We have several Russian fireplaces locally built by the Wesleyans. I've been in a couple of palces with them burning. The heat is very even throughout most of the house. You are barely aware of the heat source unless right up near the brick.
 
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I like the design of those Norwegian heaters. I could see building something similar for my shop.
 
Iiiiinteresting

The missus and I (op @Todd , my name is Todd too 🫣 )

Anyway, we went to a vendor to look at Jotols and get a general feel. At @begreen suggestion of Drolet to me last month, the Drolet site pointed me at this company as a Drolet reseller (which they are not)

Anyhow, the rep in the shop suggested Tulikivi and she had a lot of install photos. This type of masonry build is very suitable to our stone houses…And so much less burning…we’re very seriously considering building our new house around it and adding to our existing longere conversion
 
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For those curious about masonry heaters in general, this video shows a pretty good idea of what they are like running, not many videos available so please enjoy
 
Part 2 :