What's the practical longest distance between TV antenna and TV receiver, and can the signal be ampl

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Eaglecraft

Member
Aug 18, 2010
205
Eastern Idaho
Folks:

Ever since the U.S. went digital, I've had trouble with TV reception. It's the law of unintended consequences working again. At least when the signal was analog, I could see the picture, even though it may have been distorted. Now when the weather is bad, for example, a storm front moving in, I can loose some channels altogether. I live in eastern Idaho and we get the brunt of the jet-stream when in drops down to ground level.

So I have decided to replace my existing TV antenna (which is now on my roof) with a new, first-class system mounted on a meteorological tower. I just don't want an antenna on my roof any more. Plus I'm going to replace the roof soon anyway.

I want to install an antenna rotor and an amplifier. My problem is the required distance that I need to locate the met tower in a place that is inconspicuous. Can I have a 200 to 300 foot run of coax cable to my TV? I will have power to the met tower to run the rotor and an amplifier. And I suppose I will have to install a lightening rod on the tower. Can I place the amp at the tower location? Is this set-up feasible? Can you make any suggestions as to hardware? Is there such a thing as a low signal loss cable that is better than the stuff that you can usually buy in the big-box stores?

Thanks in advance for your feedback.
 

pastera

Feeling the Heat
Sep 8, 2008
336
SE Mass
Amp at the tower is the correct location - no need to amplify the signal after it is degraded

A decent quality RG-6 is fine for a 300' run after the amp. With this length of run, buy from a distributor not the big box.

Aaron
 

Eaglecraft

Member
Aug 18, 2010
205
Eastern Idaho
JMG said:
You might want to check and see that your antenna is pointed in the right direction. Use the following site, http://www.antennaweb.org/aw/welcome.aspx
I've rotated the antenna this way and that, round and round and repositioning the antenna doesn't help. I had preveiosuly evaluated the locations of TV towers in my area with the site that you suggested and they are at 90 degrees (Idaho Falls), at 180 degrees (Pocatello) and at 270 degrees (PBS) relative to our position. So I think a rotor would help to home in on the signal.

In any case, getting the antenna off the roof is a priority. I'm going to re-roof and so the antenna has got to go. It's a fairly hokey unit with failing antenna wire, etc. So a new antenna, and new cable are in order. I just can't put a hole in my new roof to install the antenna. In any case, the antenna is not high enough off the ground. It's being blocked by my own tall spruce trees.
 

velvetfoot

Minister of Fire
Dec 5, 2005
10,006
Sand Lake, NY
Maybe you could put two antennas on the tower, one for each direction (I'm no expert).
I've found an amplifier really helps.

(edit: You still have to think about uhf and vhf; I believe both signals serve up digital)
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
12,158
Southern IN
Yes, you can have that long a coax run, but first let's see what you've got to work with. Go here, type in your address and map it, then post the results with a screen shot or copy-and-paste.

http://tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=90
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
12,158
Southern IN
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