Wood Burning Insert - See through if possible?

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NewFireGuyNJ

New Member
Sep 30, 2021
4
NJ
Hi - I have an existing fireplace that has never been used (see attached photos). Space is a little awkward at 34Wx32.5Hx29.5D.

Ideally, I would like something double-sided or see-through but am having trouble finding anything that is approved in US.

Few fireplace companies I have called recommend a single-sided insert as my best option.

I was looking at the Stuve 16-78 insert but have read some reviews here about "campfire smell" when using these.

Any suggestions based on my space / existing setup??

Fireplace 1.jpg Fireplace 2.jpg
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,567
South Puget Sound, WA
We get this question once or twice a year. This season the choices are even less so the odds are no, unless something was imported. A contemoporary freestanding stove could be put in there. Something like an MF Fire Nova2 or a RAIS QTEE II would look good.
 
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NewFireGuyNJ

New Member
Sep 30, 2021
4
NJ
We get this question once or twice a year. This season the choices are even less so the odds are no, unless something was imported. A contemoporary freestanding stove could be put in there. Something like an MF Fire Nova2 or a RAIS QTEE II would look good.
Interesting on the stove, few places have told me I can't do a stove without re-doing the entire chimney?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,567
South Puget Sound, WA
The stove or an insert will need an insulated stainless liner up the existing chimney with a block-off plate at the damper area. Typically the new stove or insert will require a 6" liner. This is standard stuff, nothing special. There is plenty of room for this in that flue.
 

NewFireGuyNJ

New Member
Sep 30, 2021
4
NJ
The stove or an insert will need an insulated stainless liner up the existing chimney with a block-off plate at the damper area. This is standard stuff, nothing special. Typically the new stove or insert will require a 6" liner. There is plenty of room for this in that flue.
Ok thanks. They did mentioned the 6" liner but made it sound like a massive deal. If looking to use as a heating source vs purely aesthetic, are there any products you'd recommend other than 2 noted above?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,567
South Puget Sound, WA
A stainless steel liner is quite standard.

Anything that will fit in the space will work. It could be an insert or a freestander. How large of an area would the stove/insert be heating? Is the space pretty open or closed off by doorways? How tall is the ceiling?
 

NewFireGuyNJ

New Member
Sep 30, 2021
4
NJ
A stainless steel liner is quite standard.

Anything that will fit in the space will work. It could be an insert or a freestander. How large of an area would the stove/insert be heating? Is the space pretty open or closed off by doorways? How tall is the ceiling?
Opens onto open floor plan of over 1000sqft and 20ft (?) ceilings (floor to 2nd story roof)
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,473
SE North Carolina
Read through this thread. Looks should matter some. The amount of heat you want should matter more. I’d be tempted by some smaller to maximize the see through space but the. Your heat output and burn time will be smaller too.

 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,567
South Puget Sound, WA
Opens onto open floor plan of over 1000sqft and 20ft (?) ceilings (floor to 2nd story roof)
OK, so it will be more like heating 2000 sq ft. due to the unusually high ceilings. Heat is going to pocket up high near the ceiling peak. You will want a stove or insert with a blower and ceiling fans to help move the air. If there is also a large amount of glass exposure, then a fairly large stove or insert in the 2.5 to 3 cu ft size range will work.

Note that on the back side of the opening, grillework, perforated or expanded metal can be used to cover the hole yet allow some heat to come through.