Wood ID

ChadMc

Member
Dec 12, 2019
132
Bucks County PA
What y’all think on these? Funny is I was loading the garage rack and noticed these. The heartwood looks like cherry. I remember when I cut these it was left over long rounds and logs so I never saw the top of the tree or leaves. Regardless it sat for 2 years and is heavy as hell and not ready so I put it back outside for another year.

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PA. Woodsman

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2007
2,164
Emmaus, Pennsylvania
I have no idea but I know I have seen it before, and you're in Bucks County which is right down from me. Looks like good fuelwood, clunk a few pieces together and if they give off a higher pitched "dink" they might be ready to try, if they have a dull "thud" not so much, but it looks like good stuff!

Are the ends of the wood the same color as the inside grain?
 

gzecc

Minister of Fire
Sep 24, 2008
4,739
NNJ
need to show the end grain also
 

MoDoug

Feeling the Heat
Feb 3, 2018
310
NE Missouri
The orangeish color reminds me of locust, but not the bark.
 

hickoryhoarder

Minister of Fire
Apr 5, 2013
539
Indiana
Your stacks behind in the second photo do look like black cherry. But those pieces you've laid out don't. A different type of cherry? The bark looks nothing like black cherry. Native black cherry isn't a heavy wood. A split weighs maybe 60% of the same size red oak split.
 

NickW

Feeling the Heat
Oct 16, 2019
361
SE WI
Bark almost looks like beech, but the split face is kinda dark compared to the beech I've seen...
 

Grizzerbear

Minister of Fire
Feb 12, 2019
831
SW Missoura
The bark looks wrong, no?
I was mainly going off the inside of the piece and the fact he said it sat two years and was still heavy but most of the red oaks around here have smooth bark on the smaller limb wood higher up in the tree similar to some hickories. It was a shot in the dark lol....I'm not that great at distinguishing wood species by a picture. I want my hands and sniffer on it.
 
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aansorge

Minister of Fire
Aug 12, 2011
939
Southern Minnesota
Looks like some form of red oak. Red oak often has thin bark on smaller branches and young trees. With age and size comes the thick bark.
 
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gzecc

Minister of Fire
Sep 24, 2008
4,739
NNJ
Could be some ornamental type of tree.
 

ChadMc

Member
Dec 12, 2019
132
Bucks County PA
Ok. Stay tuned. I’m going to take a picture of what’s left of it. I planned on going back and getting more anyway. It’s on a ridge with a bunch of pines and hemlocks around if that makes a difference
 

VaForest

New Member
Aug 6, 2020
8
Southside Virginia
Looks like honey locust to me, but not 100 percent sure. Its wood looks like red oak but without rays. Look for some nasty thorns to be sure, although the thornless cultivar has escaped......
 

DandL2311

New Member
Dec 28, 2020
11
Elkhart, IN
Quercus rubra (Northern Red Oak). That’s still a fairly young tree. They grow tall and fast in the woods as they compete with everything else for sunlight. Northern Red oak doesn’t get its deep fissures on the bark until they’re much older. Plus, a Northern Red Oak doesn’t have extremely deep fissures on its bark. A Black Oak (Quercus velutina), another species of red oak (there are several), has very deep fissures on its bark and the bark looks very different from a Northern Red Oak.
 

ZZ Tom

Burning Hunk
Feb 3, 2014
112
SL,UT
www.garnerfoto.com
I say honey locust, domesticated thornless variety. Give it another year to dry. Most excellent firewood if you are patient.
 

Stinkpickle

Minister of Fire
Jan 13, 2015
523
Iowa
After some research I think that’s what it is also. Back on the rack for another year.
Oh yeah, I wasn't sure at first, but that second pic from the woods just screams honey locust. My brain even filled in all the imaginary thorns.

 

CincyBurner

Minister of Fire
Mar 10, 2015
547
SW Ohio
OP: Not sure what what branches are associated with what tree in post #15.
Can you still get a pic of the twigs/ buds, and of the branches to determine its branching habit (opposite or alternate).
If opposite, not locust.

The color of heartwood & pic of end grain is throwing me. The bark seems like maple, but tree bark can vary a lot.