Wood stove for a screened in porch?

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MooGroc

New Member
Nov 30, 2020
5
Maine, USA
We're building a new home in Maine with a screened in porch. We want a stove to make it more enjoyable to spend time in the room when it gets
a bit cold. Since the walls are screen, the stove won't be expected to heat up the room but we hope it will provide some radiant heat.

Requirements are that it be able to stand some exposure to the elements and be able to be used with just a screen instead of a closed door some of the time.

It will sit on concrete and we'll put the stovepipe through the roof and high enough to meet code (probably > 15').

Any suggestions?
 

rwhite

Minister of Fire
Nov 8, 2011
1,924
North Central Idaho
I think any heater you use will have a fairly small radiant zone. If it's a bit of heat and ambiance that your looking for I would consider a propane patio fireplace. That will allow people to sit around it and converse while staying warm. They actually put out some good heat when your sitting around them. The nice thing is they double as a table and can be covered when not in use. There is also less prep work if you decide to go sit out there and when you're done , just turn it off and your done. Another reason I'd consider a propane unit is location. Usually a porch is on the low side of the house. To get enough chimney so it burns right might require you to have 10-12 feet of chimney sticking out of the roof.
 
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MooGroc

New Member
Nov 30, 2020
5
Maine, USA
Thanks for the suggestion. I understand propane heaters would do a much better job keeping us warm, but (at least in my opinion) they don't come close in ambiance. I really want to stick with wood and the code would only require about 6' of chimney sticking out because of the distance from other parts of the structure.
 

St. Coemgen

Feeling the Heat
Feb 4, 2016
341
Hungary
www.stcoemgen.com
I agree with rwhite -- mostly only radiant heat and ambiance.

What I would sugest if you want to use wood is not a stove but a patio fireplace. Look at a search engine for "outdoor patio fireplace". You can get even more ideas if you add "stone" to the list. Since such is custom built, you can design it to suit your needs and space.

Hope this helps.
 

rwhite

Minister of Fire
Nov 8, 2011
1,924
North Central Idaho
Thanks for the suggestion. I understand propane heaters would do a much better job keeping us warm, but (at least in my opinion) they don't come close in ambiance. I really want to stick with wood and the code would only require about 6' of chimney sticking out because of the distance from other parts of the structure.
Just remember that code and what works are often different things. Code may only require a certain footage of chimney but the manufacturer of the appliance will also have a minimum height. Even at that, (based on set up and location) sometimes folls have to install more to get proper draft.
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
3,585
SE North Carolina
So I have thought about this some for my own porch. The elements will be pretty rough on some other get hot and then gets exposed to moisture. Something like this with a finish that won’t be harmed by the elements is a thought. More fireplace like and less stove like. Thinking a chiminea but suitable for the space. I’d wait a year before putting in a stove and see how you use the space. I have seen several porches in Maine that became 3 season rooms at considerable cost. That might change my feelings about what type of stove as I would be less concerned about corrosion. Just some thoughts.
Evan
CB91263B-B45B-404B-8565-B61D48024086.jpeg
 

MooGroc

New Member
Nov 30, 2020
5
Maine, USA
Thanks, EbS-P. Those look great. Something like that might be the perfect solution but the ones made for outdoor use don't seem to be designed for a through-roof chimney. Not sure how tricky it would be to fit one.
 

Pertzbro

Feeling the Heat
Aug 2, 2016
329
NW Iowa
Go with an outdoor open fireplace. You'll get the ambiance and radiant heat. It will withstand the elements better. I'm afraid a stove will get rusty rather quickly with humidity, rain, snow....

You may want to look into propane or electric radiant heaters too like you see in some restaurants mounted on the ceiling. See picture below of literally everything i just said :)

1606938763436.png
 
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john26

Minister of Fire
Oct 27, 2008
783
Wildwood MO
We used one of those radiant heaters in a shop it with through a lot of propane we had 2 100 gal tanks and it seemed like we were always filling them.
 

john26

Minister of Fire
Oct 27, 2008
783
Wildwood MO
1606950408418.png
How about a Franklin stove they can be bought cheap and burn with doors open like a fireplace
 

Easy Livin’ 3000

Minister of Fire
Dec 23, 2015
2,939
SEPA
Sign of the times. Spend a ton of money on something almost useless that is intended to impress people who really don't care and will talk about that fool who spent a ton of money trying to impress them. You'll use it as much as you would a hot tub like the folks who thought that was cool back in the 70's through 90's. Trust me, it's true.
 

john26

Minister of Fire
Oct 27, 2008
783
Wildwood MO
Sign of the times. Spend a ton of money on something almost useless that is intended to impress people who really don't care and will talk about that fool who spent a ton of money trying to impress them. You'll use it as much as you would a hot tub like the folks who thought that was cool back in the 70's through 90's. Trust me, it's true.
That what I like about the old franklin stove I have seen them for free a few times around here you can pick them up for less than $200 on a regular basis main cost would be the chimney. I would put one on my patio if it wasn't covered with a deck .
 

Easy Livin’ 3000

Minister of Fire
Dec 23, 2015
2,939
SEPA
That what I like about the old franklin stove I have seen them for free a few times around here you can pick them up for less than $200 on a regular basis main cost would be the chimney. I would put one on my patio if it wasn't covered with a deck .
I'm on board with you. Low cost and fun.

I know multiple people who have paid enormous amounts of money to have fireplaces built in covered outdoor spaces, because they saw it on HGTV. After a few uses, they all realize how stupid a decision it was.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,483
South Puget Sound, WA
Agreed. Definitely make the stove installation and chimney safe and codeworthy, but I wouldn't worry about efficiency in this case. The Franklin would work. An old Jotul F8 would also do well, so would an old Fisher or clone with double doors.
 

MooGroc

New Member
Nov 30, 2020
5
Maine, USA
We've definitely ruled out propane. I understand it's the most practical heat, but we're looking ambiance first and heat a distant second.

We really like the idea of an old Franklin (or other older, less expensive stove). It won't get rained on unless there weather is extreme
but I am worried it will rust. I guess rusting isn't a big problem unless it gets one dirty every time they touch the stove.

We also like EbS-P's suggestion of a chiminea but I'm not sure they can be modified to use a proper chimmney.

Not sure what Easy Livin’ 3000 is talking about. We've had a hot tub for 20+ years and use it every day. We have friends with a
beautiful outdoor fireplace that they love and use often.

Thanks for all the suggestions. It's very helpful.
 
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Easy Livin’ 3000

Minister of Fire
Dec 23, 2015
2,939
SEPA
We've definitely ruled out propane. I understand it's the most practical heat, but we're looking ambiance first and heat a distant second.

We really like the idea of an old Franklin (or other older, less expensive stove). It won't get rained on unless there weather is extreme
but I am worried it will rust. I guess rusting isn't a big problem unless it gets one dirty every time they touch the stove.

We also like EbS-P's suggestion of a chiminea but I'm not sure they can be modified to use a proper chimmney.

Not sure what Easy Livin’ 3000 is talking about. We've had a hot tub for 20+ years and use it every day. We have friends with a
beautiful outdoor fireplace that they love and use often.

Thanks for all the suggestions. It's very helpful.
Well then, I stand corrected.

I've seen hundreds of hot tubs, and none were used. I've seen dozens of outside fireplaces installed over the last decade. They are almost never used.

But there's almost always an exception to a rule.

You are diamonds in the rough, hanging out in your hot tub almost every day, and an outside stove would definitely add to that ambiance.

What you are doing is vastly preferable to what I, and almost everyone else does every day. Crap out in front of the boob tube. Ugh.

Hats off to you!
 

MooGroc

New Member
Nov 30, 2020
5
Maine, USA
Well then, I stand corrected.

I've seen hundreds of hot tubs, and none were used. I've seen dozens of outside fireplaces installed over the last decade. They are almost never used.

But there's almost always an exception to a rule.

You are diamonds in the rough, hanging out in your hot tub almost every day, and an outside stove would definitely add to that ambiance.

What you are doing is vastly preferable to what I, and almost everyone else does every day. Crap out in front of the boob tube. Ugh.

Hats off to you!

I don't think it's rare for people with hot tubs to use them Perhaps outdoor fireplaces are less used. I guess it's impossible
to know with any accuracy.

I haven't owned or watched TV in over 20 years.
 
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Easy Livin’ 3000

Minister of Fire
Dec 23, 2015
2,939
SEPA
I don't think it's rare for people with hot tubs to use them Perhaps outdoor fireplaces are less used. I guess it's impossible
to know with any accuracy.

I haven't owned or watched TV in over 20 years.
That's absolutely beautiful, I've considered throwing the tv out the window for about 20 years myself. It's a complete waste of time and money. What's kept me from doing it? It distracts the people who live with me from what a boring cretin they are living with, and they tend to stick around longer.

Once the tv is gone, we'll just need to get off the social media, an even more insidious waste of time and money.

I need to find one of these hot tub communities you are seeing and move there. I think it's a better way.
 

firefighterjake

Minister of Fire
Jul 22, 2008
19,593
Unity/Bangor, Maine
For the record my wife and I like our hot tub . . . well liked . . . it broke and we didn't fix it for the past two years, but we did order a new hot tub which will hopefully be delivered this month.
 
Apr 15, 2022
42
Maryland
We're building a new home in Maine with a screened in porch. We want a stove to make it more enjoyable to spend time in the room when it gets
a bit cold. Since the walls are screen, the stove won't be expected to heat up the room but we hope it will provide some radiant heat.

Requirements are that it be able to stand some exposure to the elements and be able to be used with just a screen instead of a closed door some of the time.

It will sit on concrete and we'll put the stovepipe through the roof and high enough to meet code (probably > 15').

Any suggestions?
I suggest looking at Sunspace windows on YouTube and consider incorporating them. That’s what we are doing in MD this July and I feel the wood stove will do well with them! Cheers!
 

shortys7777

Feeling the Heat
Nov 15, 2017
423
Smithfield, RI
My dad built some plexiglass windows that easily mount over the screen for the spring and fall in MA. He doesn't have a stove out there, but it makes a huge difference. Maybe you can buy some and build some basic wooden frames and put those up? Of course you'll need enough space to store them in the summer time though. What part of Maine? I spend some time up there at my lake house east of Augusta.
 

xman23

Minister of Fire
Oct 7, 2008
2,466
Lackawaxen PA
I read this thread till the end, before seeing it's a few years old. Love! Easy Livin 3000 comment on "bougie people", completely agree, find myself dailly saying what a jackass he or she is. My father would say "more money than brains". Wood burn`er forum. Probably less of them here. But sounds like a great idea extending the screened in porch wine and cigar season. I would go with the a closed wood stove, as sparks pop out and set the house on fire.
I to saw those removable, large screens / plexa glass setups, very nice. But you do need to store them.