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MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
814
NW Ontario
Very slowly the pile is getting stacked. However I'm not sure if it's shrinking? Good problem to have more than likely, however I do need to wrap the wood up soon :)

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Also started a new uglies bin with the IBC tote cage I scrounged. I think it will work out nicely.

Rows are 28ft long, 5ft high.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
5,850
Downeast Maine
My friend came to help but, could not get the tractor out. He said it didn't even budge and I was starting to dig holes with my truck in my driveway. Called in a tow truck and he winched it out. Thankfully my friend had 200' of tree felling cable and a snatch block (I have one too, but his is nicer) so the tow truck didn't have to drive in the mud and get stuck too. I would never have attempted with my truck without those long cables, not that it mattered. Glad to have gotten the tractor unstuck without breaking anything!
 

MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
814
NW Ontario
If it’s just for the summer I wouldn’t think twice about leaving it uncovered. It’s not like it’s going to be buried under snow. I have read that some folks leave theirs uncovered till winter then top cover, some cover straight away. I am like you it’s not worth the hassle to me. Your climate may have an effect on it if you have a lot of rainy/drizzling weather.
Wanted to circle around and ask you fellas a follow-up re: top-covering. I know there's a lot of debate on the forum about covering vs. not - my plan is to leave my stacks of ash open to the elements all summer, but I was wondering what you all think of leaving them exposed all winter? We get a lot of snow up here, and my stacks will get pretty good and buried. If I'm not burning this wood for another 2 years, would it really be that bad for it to get encapsulated in snow all winter?
 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
5,850
Downeast Maine
Today while limbing some trees the my sprocket nose bar decided it wanted to be a hard nose bar. I decided to take a gamble on a Chinese made Archer brand bar since it was half the price of the Stihl. Should have just bought the Stihl bar the first time. I may still try the Archer brand chain in the future, it claims to be a low profile 3/8 chain comparable to the expensive Stihl PMX low profile ripping chain.
 

JimBear

Minister of Fire
Dec 15, 2017
647
Iowa
Wanted to circle around and ask you fellas a follow-up re: top-covering. I know there's a lot of debate on the forum about covering vs. not - my plan is to leave my stacks of ash open to the elements all summer, but I was wondering what you all think of leaving them exposed all winter? We get a lot of snow up here, and my stacks will get pretty good and buried. If I'm not burning this wood for another 2 years, would it really be that bad for it to get encapsulated in snow all winter?
I don’t top cover anything but that’s just my preference, one less thing I have to worry about. If we get enough snow to bury my stacks we are having a wicked winter. I have seen several pics of wood stacks/piles buried in snow & most were top covered. Hopefully some of the northern folks will chime in.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
5,850
Downeast Maine
Wanted to circle around and ask you fellas a follow-up re: top-covering. I know there's a lot of debate on the forum about covering vs. not - my plan is to leave my stacks of ash open to the elements all summer, but I was wondering what you all think of leaving them exposed all winter? We get a lot of snow up here, and my stacks will get pretty good and buried. If I'm not burning this wood for another 2 years, would it really be that bad for it to get encapsulated in snow all winter?
For what it's worth, I only top cover the two weeks of wood I need at a time, but that's also because I don't have a shed. When I build a shed it will hold 4-6 cord and I will only have to fill it up once a year.
 
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kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,760
07462
Did the first mow yesterday, forgot how much I liked mowing lol, also rented a motorized aerator, that machine kicked the crap out of me, cutting and splitting way easier lol. I have about 3/4 of an acre of grass, some nice flat area's and some slope, the machine didnt like running straight, nor does it like turning, generally larger curved loops but you still have to muscle it, took about 2hrs of running it and I was shot afterwards, it looks like I had 10,000 geese spend the winter here, pooping everywhere.
Today is over seed w/ a light starter fertilizer on everything, then taking my machine to a friends to remove a bunch of bushes that are to close to the house and transplanting them to parts of my yard.
 
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kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,760
07462
@SpaceBus I had trouble with my bar to, and at $80 per bar I wasnt to happy, I did buy a new bar but I cleaned the crap out of the old one, picking debris from the nose / sprocket area then forcing grease into it, I ran it a few times and back in business.
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
908
Massachusetts
Wanted to circle around and ask you fellas a follow-up re: top-covering. I know there's a lot of debate on the forum about covering vs. not - my plan is to leave my stacks of ash open to the elements all summer, but I was wondering what you all think of leaving them exposed all winter? We get a lot of snow up here, and my stacks will get pretty good and buried. If I'm not burning this wood for another 2 years, would it really be that bad for it to get encapsulated in snow all winter?
I just use some tarps or metal roofing with weights if you have it. It's easy enough and less water is good IMO. I only cover about 6 inches down the face with the tarps. With a rigid roof a decent overhang is nice. Probably not necessary but it can't hurt.
 
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NickW

Feeling the Heat
Oct 16, 2019
480
SE WI
Wanted to circle around and ask you fellas a follow-up re: top-covering. I know there's a lot of debate on the forum about covering vs. not - my plan is to leave my stacks of ash open to the elements all summer, but I was wondering what you all think of leaving them exposed all winter? We get a lot of snow up here, and my stacks will get pretty good and buried. If I'm not burning this wood for another 2 years, would it really be that bad for it to get encapsulated in snow all winter?
I'm good without top covering in WI. I move my winters supply indoors starting in August or September during dry snaps a little at a time to allow more surface moisture to evaporate off.

Cheap tarps that rip and get holes are worse than no cover because it allows moisture in but then doesn't allow it back out.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
5,850
Downeast Maine
@SpaceBus I had trouble with my bar to, and at $80 per bar I wasnt to happy, I did buy a new bar but I cleaned the crap out of the old one, picking debris from the nose / sprocket area then forcing grease into it, I ran it a few times and back in business.
Yeah, I ordered a new OEM bar since the Archer brand bar decided to spontaneously convert itself to a hard nose bar. I still have the old OEM bar, but it's pretty much toast and cuts potato chips. My pole pruner uses the same bar so I have a backup if I absolutely need one.
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
908
Massachusetts
I'm good without top covering in WI. I move my winters supply indoors starting in August or September during dry snaps a little at a time to allow more surface moisture to evaporate off.

Cheap tarps that rip and get holes are worse than no cover because it allows moisture in but then doesn't allow it back out.
I'll edit my post to just say tarps not "cheap" tarps. Wrong word. I fold mine over so there are 2 layers and keep minimum overhang on the font and back to let the moisture escape and the wind get at it. It doesn't work as well as a roof but it's fine. We get a ton of rain here in spring. I'd take the covers off in summer but its such a pain I don't bother. I just accept the fact that tarps suck and only last a year. I intend to roof all my supply but with the current cost of building materials I'm slumming it for another season with the tarps. Not paying $11 for a 2x4 that's for sure!

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Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
908
Massachusetts
@SpaceBus I had trouble with my bar to, and at $80 per bar I wasnt to happy, I did buy a new bar but I cleaned the crap out of the old one, picking debris from the nose / sprocket area then forcing grease into it, I ran it a few times and back in business.
Yeah I paid $66 for an OEM Husqvarna this fall...very annoying but it glides well. Worth the money.
 

thewoodlands

Minister of Fire
Aug 25, 2009
13,588
Foothills of The Adirondacks
I put two loads of Pine needles on the trail going up through what we call the bowl, they went on the right side when you're heading up which was the lowest side.

After talking with our neighbor, I did a trail check on the rest of our property. The only thing across the trail was a small Maple that I bucked up and brought home.
 

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MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
814
NW Ontario
I just use some tarps or metal roofing with weights if you have it. It's easy enough and less water is good IMO. I only cover about 6 inches down the face with the tarps. With a rigid roof a decent overhang is nice. Probably not necessary but it can't hurt.
ya it would be a lot of metal roofing that i don't have and would need to buy. Have lots of tarps, and you're right - top covered is better than not, but it's gonna be a bit of a PIA getting the tarps secured for overwinter in a way that's gonna make them last the winter, and not fill with snow and fall down between the stacks. I guess i could bridge the gaps with scrap wood, but now we're talking a whole project that I won't likely have the physical ability to do, which is the crux of why i'm asking.
 

MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
814
NW Ontario
I'm good without top covering in WI. I move my winters supply indoors starting in August or September during dry snaps a little at a time to allow more surface moisture to evaporate off.

Cheap tarps that rip and get holes are worse than no cover because it allows moisture in but then doesn't allow it back out.
Ya, but would you leave your stacks out in the element over winter without top covering? This wood isn't getting moved somewhere cozy before the snow flies :)
 

MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
814
NW Ontario
Here's the progress so far with my stacking:
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My plan is to stack 4 rows deep. There is a bit of a gap between rows 1&2, and will be the same for 3&4. I'm not even sure that all the wood is going to fit into the 4 stacks, but I'll figure that out when I get there.

I am definitely not farting around with tarps this summer. These stacks will sit as is, but then I'm trying to decide how/if to top cover for the winter as I previously mentioned. I don't want to attempt something that leads to instability or toppling.

On a different note, each of those completed rows is roughly 1.5 cords, so I think it's safe to say that I made out like a bandit on this particular transaction, and will definitely stick with this supplier and method so long as my body will cooperate. Got way more wood than the 4 cords I paid for. :)
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
908
Massachusetts
ya it would be a lot of metal roofing that i don't have and would need to buy. Have lots of tarps, and you're right - top covered is better than not, but it's gonna be a bit of a PIA getting the tarps secured for overwinter in a way that's gonna make them last the winter, and not fill with snow and fall down between the stacks. I guess i could bridge the gaps with scrap wood, but now we're talking a whole project that I won't likely have the physical ability to do, which is the crux of why i'm asking.
I have 2 x 1 cord stacks with an 8 inch gap and I just run the tarp over both doubled. No need to bridge the gap. If the tarps are secure it'll brige 8 inches easily. I just use tarp ties, little balls with bungees. The other side tarp clips and the same thing. It's very easy and budget friendly just a pita to resecure every time you want to remove wood. It's a great option in the non burning season though on a budget.

Nothing beats a roof with a good overhang though. Best of both worlds. On the agenda when lumber is reasonable again.
 

MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
814
NW Ontario
I have 2 x 1 cord stacks with an 8 inch gap and I just run the tarp over both doubled. No need to bridge the gap. If the tarps are secure it'll brige 8 inches easily. I just use tarp ties, little balls with bungees. The other side tarp clips and the same thing. It's very easy and budget friendly just a pita to resecure every time you want to remove wood. It's a great option in the non burning season though on a budget.

Nothing beats a roof with a good overhang though. Best of both worlds. On the agenda when lumber is reasonable again.
Hey thanks for the details on your set-up. I see you're in an area that gets snow, so it's nice to hear that your tarping over the gap holds up. My concern is that the weight of the snow on top of the tarp will cause the tarp to sag in the gap, and cause things to topple, or rip open. But perhaps I'll just throw a tarp over the whole shibang in September and see what happens!
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,760
07462
I don't want to attempt something that leads to instability or toppling.
I've done this method before and will do it again, I just run a center strip of wood right down the middle about a foot above the rest of the pile to make a ridge so the tarp self drains, didnt have any issues with the tarp ripping and all water / snow was able to drain away easily, plus it sort of acts like an air vent to.
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,760
07462
Spent yesterday running fire calls and doing more yard work, got the top soil patches down, over seeding done and a light application of lawn food in before the rain came, unfortunately the rain wasnt as advertised, the forecast called for a 1/2 to 3/4" total, we ended up getting .12" which wasnt nearly enough for anything.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
5,850
Downeast Maine
I've done this method before and will do it again, I just run a center strip of wood right down the middle about a foot above the rest of the pile to make a ridge so the tarp self drains, didnt have any issues with the tarp ripping and all water / snow was able to drain away easily, plus it sort of acts like an air vent to.
I've done this with a rope as well.
 
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Solarguy3500

Member
Dec 3, 2020
113
Western MA
This weekend I added another section onto my pallet woodshed and started stacking some maple in it. I just need to cut another one of my 16' long old metal roofing panels into 3 pieces for the roof.
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In the area where I'm building these woodsheds, I had 2 big dead maples dropped in the lawn in late 2019 and I've been working on cutting it up and splitting it this spring. When those trees fell, a couple of branches stuck deep into the ground so I had a couple branches sticking out of the ground. I don't have a tractor, so the old International Scout got to pull double duty again as a skidder to pull them out.
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That one left quite a hole. It was in there pretty good.
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