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MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
814
NW Ontario
spent the afternoon stacking, and made some progress:

1619570327867.png

1619570376388.png

I think I can safely say that I'm gonna have to put another row of pallets down and go six rows deep to get it all stacked. I have a good cord of Manitoba maple that I need to add to the pile, so six deep it is I guess. Was a beautiful sunny day, and a great day for puttering. Two weeks today until shoulder surgery - I should have it all wrapped up in time so long as my joints cooperate :)
 

Diabel

Minister of Fire
Jan 11, 2008
3,164
Ottawa, ON
Two weeks today until shoulder surgery - I should have it all wrapped up in time so long as my joints cooperate :)
I am sure everything will go well! Please take care and check in once you are back and running!
Btw stacks look perfect!
 
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thewoodlands

Minister of Fire
Aug 25, 2009
13,588
Foothills of The Adirondacks
Not pictured was a load of Ironwood from up top and a nice long ride with the wife when I dug up four bags of leeks for two neighbors.

I finally felled the last Yellow Birch in the sandpit area, it had a heavy peppermint smell to it, it's all bucked up and ready to split. I didn't cut my usual 12 face cord this spring but after spitting & stacking what I did cut, I should have a total of 52 to 53 face cord up.
 

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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
5,850
Downeast Maine
I changed the HST filter on the tractor yesterday. Before doing this I tried to find videos of other people doing this, some kind of literature about it, etc. The manual just says to remove the filter and put a new one on. I figured a bit of fluid would be lost, but I only got 2.5 gallons extra fluid to have on hand. Yeah, it just dumped everywhere once the filter started coming off. I even tried to get the filter side of the tractor higher in the air. So the tractor will be parked until the 10 gallons of Mobil 424 at $225 shipped arrives here. Not the worst day ever, but frustrating.
 

NickW

Feeling the Heat
Oct 16, 2019
480
SE WI
Started moving my firewood stacks on our property up north after the excavator said it will help drainage to take the little knob they are on down plus give me more fill.

Footings went in yesterday. Horrible time to be needing lumber - frustrations about that are in the lumber prices thread... already warned the wife that finishes and phase 2 (basement bedrooms and bathroom) will probably be delayed.
 

MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
814
NW Ontario
Not pictured was a load of Ironwood from up top and a nice long ride with the wife when I dug up four bags of leeks for two neighbors.

I finally felled the last Yellow Birch in the sandpit area, it had a heavy peppermint smell to it, it's all bucked up and ready to split. I didn't cut my usual 12 face cord this spring but after spitting & stacking what I did cut, I should have a total of 52 to 53 face cord up.
I always wondered from your pictures how much wood you have on hand - so around 18 full cords? Wow - that's great!
 
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thewoodlands

Minister of Fire
Aug 25, 2009
13,588
Foothills of The Adirondacks
I always wondered from your pictures how much wood you have on hand - so around 18 full cords? Wow - that's great!
I haven't done the conversion yet but I'm thinking 18 full cord would be high but for not getting much firewood last fall or this spring, we'll take it.

We also burned 50 bags of pellets this past heating season, heating from the basement can be tough once the colder weather hits.
 
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thewoodlands

Minister of Fire
Aug 25, 2009
13,588
Foothills of The Adirondacks
I filled a face cord stack (the third stack in from the left) that was about 1/4 full before today, I added some Yellow Birch and Maple to it.

Before I did the above, I took a load of leaves up to the trail I've been working on, the boss raked them up yesterday. We're finally getting some rain, Accu has us getting about half an inch.

From left to right we have, a face cord of seasoned Ironwood, a face of Beech, a face of Beech, Sugar Maple, Soft Maple, Yellow Birch and the last stack in the front row is another face of American Hophornbeam or Ironwood.
 

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thewoodlands

Minister of Fire
Aug 25, 2009
13,588
Foothills of The Adirondacks
I always wondered from your pictures how much wood you have on hand - so around 18 full cords? Wow - that's great!
I just did the conversion, we have 16.83 full cords stacked, I'm thinking that the wood I cut this spring will put us pretty close to 18 full cord, so you're correct on the total.

The length of our firewood is just under 16 inches (15 3/4 ) our stack height is 48 inches and the length of a face cord stack is 96 inches, hopefully I did the conversion right.
 

MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
814
NW Ontario
I just did the conversion, we have 16.83 full cords stacked, I'm thinking that the wood I cut this spring will put us pretty close to 18 full cord, so you're correct on the total.

The length of our firewood is just under 16 inches (15 3/4 ) our stack height is 48 inches and the length of a face cord stack is 96 inches, hopefully I did the conversion right.
That's great! Must feel really good sitting on so much well seasoned wood. I use this little cord calculator:

How much wood do you burn in an average winter?
 
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thewoodlands

Minister of Fire
Aug 25, 2009
13,588
Foothills of The Adirondacks
That's great! Must feel really good sitting on so much well seasoned wood. I use this little cord calculator:

How much wood do you burn in an average winter?
Hardwood between 10-12 face cord. Shoulder season wood we burn between 4-6 face cord of Pine.

I had forgot we had six face cord of shoulder season wood stack in a different area so your first estimate was pretty dang close.

We're loaded with White Pine after the clearing we did for the new garage in 2018, I can't burn it fast enough.
 

MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
814
NW Ontario
Hardwood between 10-12 face cord. Shoulder season wood we burn between 4-6 face cord of Pine.

I had forgot we had six face cord of shoulder season wood stack in a different area so your first estimate was pretty dang close.

We're loaded with White Pine after the clearing we did for the new garage in 2018, I can't burn it fast enough.
Right on! It's so nice that you have access to so many different types of wood. I think I would fall even deeper into my firewood obsession if I had access to all those species, and could introduce that variable to my burning to fine-tune my operations depending on the weather and fire that I wanted. As it is, I'm so excited to get into the winter where I'll be burning my newly acquired ash, which I've never had before!

I love burning pine. It's just so easy to burn, and I love the smell of it. I will always always take pine when I can get my hands on it, and as far as scrounging/harvesting for myself, it's what's available up here. Nothing beats a pine fire for me, but ask me again in 3 years. :)
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
5,850
Downeast Maine
Right on! It's so nice that you have access to so many different types of wood. I think I would fall even deeper into my firewood obsession if I had access to all those species, and could introduce that variable to my burning to fine-tune my operations depending on the weather and fire that I wanted. As it is, I'm so excited to get into the winter where I'll be burning my newly acquired ash, which I've never had before!

I love burning pine. It's just so easy to burn, and I love the smell of it. I will always always take pine when I can get my hands on it, and as far as scrounging/harvesting for myself, it's what's available up here. Nothing beats a pine fire for me, but ask me again in 3 years. :)
My wife usually can't stand the smell of smoke, but if a bit of spruce, fir, or tamarack smoke drifts out while I'm lighting the stove she doesn't mind, maybe won't even notice. On the other hand if a gust comes down the chimney while I'm lighting up hardwoods she can smell it instantly, even upstairs in the bathroom. The only pine I've burned in my stove is kiln dried carpentry scraps, but they do smell pretty good. I like to use it in my outdoor rocket cookstove. So far I've only burned the softwoods I mentioned, birch, hard maple, poplar, and a bit of cherry, hard maple smells like burning BBQ sauce.
 

NickW

Feeling the Heat
Oct 16, 2019
480
SE WI
Right on! It's so nice that you have access to so many different types of wood. I think I would fall even deeper into my firewood obsession if I had access to all those species, and could introduce that variable to my burning to fine-tune my operations depending on the weather and fire that I wanted. As it is, I'm so excited to get into the winter where I'll be burning my newly acquired ash, which I've never had before!

I love burning pine. It's just so easy to burn, and I love the smell of it. I will always always take pine when I can get my hands on it, and as far as scrounging/harvesting for myself, it's what's available up here. Nothing beats a pine fire for me, but ask me again in 3 years. :)
In 3 years I bet you'll be singing the praises of ash. Lights well, burns pretty hot, lasts fairly long, coals well. When it's really cold and I need a lot of BTU's, in the late afternoon or early evening I run a load of softwood to burn down the coals before the overnight load of hardwood. If it gets too late, I'll burn it down with bark instead. I usually keep a couple of crates of bark on hand for burning the coals down. Note that you'll have way more ashes from hardwood. It's not called ash for nothing... ;)
 

NickW

Feeling the Heat
Oct 16, 2019
480
SE WI
Right on! It's so nice that you have access to so many different types of wood. I think I would fall even deeper into my firewood obsession if I had access to all those species, and could introduce that variable to my burning to fine-tune my operations depending on the weather and fire that I wanted. As it is, I'm so excited to get into the winter where I'll be burning my newly acquired ash, which I've never had before!

I love burning pine. It's just so easy to burn, and I love the smell of it. I will always always take pine when I can get my hands on it, and as far as scrounging/harvesting for myself, it's what's available up here. Nothing beats a pine fire for me, but ask me again in 3 years. :)
In 3 years I bet you'll be singing the praises of ash. Lights well, burns pretty hot, lasts fairly long, coals well. When it's really cold and I need a lot of BTU's, in the late afternoon or early evening I run a load of softwood to burn down the coals before the overnight load of hardwood. If it gets too late, I'll burn it down with bark instead. I usually keep a couple of crates of bark on hand for burning the coals down. Note that you'll have way more ashes from hardwood. It's not called ash for nothing... ;)
 

NickW

Feeling the Heat
Oct 16, 2019
480
SE WI
Right on! It's so nice that you have access to so many different types of wood. I think I would fall even deeper into my firewood obsession if I had access to all those species, and could introduce that variable to my burning to fine-tune my operations depending on the weather and fire that I wanted. As it is, I'm so excited to get into the winter where I'll be burning my newly acquired ash, which I've never had before!

I love burning pine. It's just so easy to burn, and I love the smell of it. I will always always take pine when I can get my hands on it, and as far as scrounging/harvesting for myself, it's what's available up here. Nothing beats a pine fire for me, but ask me again in 3 years. :)
In 3 years I bet you'll be singing the praises of ash. Lights well, burns pretty hot, lasts fairly long, coals well. When it's really cold and I need a lot of BTU's, in the late afternoon or early evening I run a load of softwood to burn down the coals before the overnight load of hardwood. If it gets too late, I'll burn it down with bark instead. I usually keep a couple of crates of bark on hand for burning the coals down. Note that you'll have way more ashes from hardwood. It's not called ash for nothing... ;)
 

NickW

Feeling the Heat
Oct 16, 2019
480
SE WI
Right on! It's so nice that you have access to so many different types of wood. I think I would fall even deeper into my firewood obsession if I had access to all those species, and could introduce that variable to my burning to fine-tune my operations depending on the weather and fire that I wanted. As it is, I'm so excited to get into the winter where I'll be burning my newly acquired ash, which I've never had before!

I love burning pine. It's just so easy to burn, and I love the smell of it. I will always always take pine when I can get my hands on it, and as far as scrounging/harvesting for myself, it's what's available up here. Nothing beats a pine fire for me, but ask me again in 3 years. :)
In 3 years I bet you'll be singing the praises of ash. Lights well, burns pretty hot, lasts fairly long, coals well. When it's really cold and I need a lot of BTU's, in the late afternoon or early evening I run a load of softwood to burn down the coals before the overnight load of hardwood. If it gets too late, I'll burn it down with bark instead. I usually keep a couple of crates of bark on hand for burning the coals down. Note that you'll have way more ashes from hardwood. It's not called ash for nothing... ;)
 

NickW

Feeling the Heat
Oct 16, 2019
480
SE WI
Right on! It's so nice that you have access to so many different types of wood. I think I would fall even deeper into my firewood obsession if I had access to all those species, and could introduce that variable to my burning to fine-tune my operations depending on the weather and fire that I wanted. As it is, I'm so excited to get into the winter where I'll be burning my newly acquired ash, which I've never had before!

I love burning pine. It's just so easy to burn, and I love the smell of it. I will always always take pine when I can get my hands on it, and as far as scrounging/harvesting for myself, it's what's available up here. Nothing beats a pine fire for me, but ask me again in 3 years. :)
In 3 years I bet you'll be singing the praises of ash. Lights well, burns pretty hot, lasts fairly long, coals well. When it's really cold and I need a lot of BTU's, in the late afternoon or early evening I run a load of softwood to burn down the coals before the overnight load of hardwood. If it gets too late, I'll burn it down with bark instead. I usually keep a couple of crates of bark on hand for burning the coals down. Note that you'll have way more ashes from hardwood. It's not called ash for nothing... ;)
 

NickW

Feeling the Heat
Oct 16, 2019
480
SE WI
Right on! It's so nice that you have access to so many different types of wood. I think I would fall even deeper into my firewood obsession if I had access to all those species, and could introduce that variable to my burning to fine-tune my operations depending on the weather and fire that I wanted. As it is, I'm so excited to get into the winter where I'll be burning my newly acquired ash, which I've never had before!

I love burning pine. It's just so easy to burn, and I love the smell of it. I will always always take pine when I can get my hands on it, and as far as scrounging/harvesting for myself, it's what's available up here. Nothing beats a pine fire for me, but ask me again in 3 years. :)
In 3 years I bet you'll be singing the praises of ash. Lights well, burns pretty hot, lasts fairly long, coals well. When it's really cold and I need a lot of BTU's, in the late afternoon or early evening I run a load of softwood to burn down the coals before the overnight load of hardwood. If it gets too late, I'll burn it down with bark instead. I usually keep a couple of crates of bark on hand for burning the coals down. Note that you'll have way more ashes from hardwood. It's not called ash for nothing... ;)
 

NickW

Feeling the Heat
Oct 16, 2019
480
SE WI
Right on! It's so nice that you have access to so many different types of wood. I think I would fall even deeper into my firewood obsession if I had access to all those species, and could introduce that variable to my burning to fine-tune my operations depending on the weather and fire that I wanted. As it is, I'm so excited to get into the winter where I'll be burning my newly acquired ash, which I've never had before!

I love burning pine. It's just so easy to burn, and I love the smell of it. I will always always take pine when I can get my hands on it, and as far as scrounging/harvesting for myself, it's what's available up here. Nothing beats a pine fire for me, but ask me again in 3 years. :)
In 3 years I bet you'll be singing the praises of ash. Lights well, burns pretty hot, lasts fairly long, coals well. When it's really cold and I need a lot of BTU's, in the late afternoon or early evening I run a load of softwood to burn down the coals before the overnight load of hardwood. If it gets too late, I'll burn it down with bark instead. I usually keep a couple of crates of bark on hand for burning the coals down. Note that you'll have way more ashes from hardwood. It's not called ash for nothing... ;)
 

thewoodlands

Minister of Fire
Aug 25, 2009
13,588
Foothills of The Adirondacks
Right on! It's so nice that you have access to so many different types of wood. I think I would fall even deeper into my firewood obsession if I had access to all those species, and could introduce that variable to my burning to fine-tune my operations depending on the weather and fire that I wanted. As it is, I'm so excited to get into the winter where I'll be burning my newly acquired ash, which I've never had before!

I love burning pine. It's just so easy to burn, and I love the smell of it. I will always always take pine when I can get my hands on it, and as far as scrounging/harvesting for myself, it's what's available up here. Nothing beats a pine fire for me, but ask me again in 3 years. :)
We haven't burned much Ash either but since EAB hit our county, I started felling them. We have 24 face cord of Ash that is seasoned and ready. We still have some nice trees that are still up and look good, I hate felling them but I've seen videos of dead Ash being felled after the EAB killed it, it shatters like glass when it hits the ground.
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,760
07462
Ash being felled after the EAB killed it, it shatters like glass when it hits the ground.
It sure does, the inner heart wood separates from the outer layers, its also fairly dangerous to drop them dead, you need to notch then plunge cut, never notch and start from the back like typical trees
 

thewoodlands

Minister of Fire
Aug 25, 2009
13,588
Foothills of The Adirondacks
I took another load of leaves, pine needles and some bark up to the trail I've been working on, after that I picked some Ironwood up that I cut after putting in a new trail early this spring.

I grabbed another Ironwood that was starting to rot on the backside, that pretty much made a full load which I brought down to the new splitting area until I open up an area for stacking a face cord.

The second picture is the Ironwood I felled.

104_1714.JPG 104_1724.JPG 104_1725.JPG 104_1726.JPG 104_1733.JPG
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
5,850
Downeast Maine
It sure does, the inner heart wood separates from the outer layers, its also fairly dangerous to drop them dead, you need to notch then plunge cut, never notch and start from the back like typical trees
Where would you start the plunge if not from the opposite side of the hinge?
 

Diabel

Minister of Fire
Jan 11, 2008
3,164
Ottawa, ON
I have never done a plunge cut. It makes so much sense in terms of physics. Should not all the “leaners” be cut such way? Hell all trees?
 

MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
814
NW Ontario
Where would you start the plunge if not from the opposite side of the hinge?
so you start kinda in the middle of the tree, leaving enough holding wood, and then slowly work your way back to the side opposite the notch. so to start it, you have to bore the nose of your bar into the tree, which is easy to do - just make sure that you start the cut first a bit before swinging the bar around to plunge the tip, otherwise you'll get some mighty kickback. you leave enough wood on the non-notch side so that you remove the bar, and then finish the cut about 1/2 inch lower than the plunge, this time cutting towards your notch like you normally do on a back-cut. doing it this way relieves the tension and possibility of a bad barber chair/uncontrolled tree fall. also use this on heavy leaners. i'm sure there's lots of videos on google. :)

edit: sorry, i neglected to say that the plunge cut is parallel to your notch (i.e. along the same plane that you'd normally make your back cut, only you're starting in the middle of the tree working out) - the pics should clarify
 
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