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Annual appeal- don't buy a rabbit

Post in 'The Inglenook' started by Adios Pantalones, Mar 25, 2013.

  1. ironpony

    ironpony Minister of Fire

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    Since I live in the country, people from town like dropping off their stray cats in my area causing a major influx of feral cats. One of the neighbors looks at them as barn cats, and feeds them in the winter. In the summer these same cats get at my chickens, the first year we lost 6 of our 7 laying hens, last year 3 cats died of lead poising and we only lost chicken due to a (hawk/owl).








    you have lead based paint on you chicken coop??

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  2. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    I'm guessing it was more of a direct injection (as I'm sure you knew).

    Around here anymore, if the right person catches wind of that happening, it'll be time to prepare to defend oneself in a different way.

    As always, good announcement A.P.

    pen
  3. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    Thanks, pen. Every time this sort of thing comes up, someone has to try and look tough. No better way than to shoot a small domesticated animal.
  4. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    My neighbor raises rabbits and they get loose frequently. Two gray ones hang out around my place. My 14 month old son has a blast playing in the yard with them.
  5. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    I've put several of them in my freezer. I just keep an eye out on C List for people giving them away.
  6. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Ummm...no. I have no problem with hunting a rabbit in the wild, or shooting a yote that is packed up at the edge of my yard, but that doesn't mean I am going to shoot your domesticated dog...or rabbit.
  7. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    Bobbin likes this.
  8. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Naaa...Nate is not a troll...he is an Alaskan.;lol
  9. MishMouse

    MishMouse Minister of Fire

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    I think you may have missed my point. My main point is that if you get a pet, and you can't take care of it, don't just drop it off in the country expecting someone to take care of it or that it will find food. That is not humane in any way shape or form. Most of the pets I have seen dropped off will either starve, end up road kill, get rabies, start killing wild birds (turkeys, partriges, etc..) or start getting into the neighbors livestock and killing it for food. They create havoc in the area you release it in.

    The year I lost my chickens (my kids named everyone of them and they were their pets) I did catch a few cats and I did release them, not one cat got shot that year . My thought was that it would have scared them and they wouldn't be back. I was wrong, one of the cats I caught and released, was found last year in the chicken pen trying to get into the coop, I did not want to get rid of the cats, but they were killing my chickens, so something had to happen to make it stop. These cats had no real owners, the sheriff wouldn't do anything with them, the animal shelter would not take them, there are no animal resuce shelters that would take these cats.

    The point is no matter what pet you may think of getting, if you do get it and you can't take care of it don't just drop it off somewhere expecting some else to take care of it, most likely it will become someone elses problem and it will not have a happy ending.
    Adios Pantalones likes this.
  10. northwinds

    northwinds Minister of Fire

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    My kids raised dwarf rabbits for 4H. We lost one rabbit when my wife was giving it some exercise in an outdoor fenced area and forgot to put it back into the outbuilding. Very hot day, and it was not pretty. The remaining two rabbits are several years old. They don't come into the house, except for baths, and do great outdoors in a small outbuilding with hutches. Other members of the 4H group do raise rabbits for meat. I've eaten wild and domesticated rabbit, and the meat is quite good.

    I agree with the premise that if you are going to take on a pet, then you should be prepared to take good care of it. This thread reminds me of the scene in "Roger and Me" with the lady selling rabbits for pets or meat. Viewer discretion advised.
  11. Delta-T

    Delta-T Minister of Fire

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    my fav animal rescue league establishment has rabbits for adoption. I frequent the place to play with the cats (is where we got our cats from). I play with the rabbits too. they also have giant hampster/very small ROUS (guinea pigs, not quite as nice as cat or rabbit, but they are sorta cute). Have seen some turtles there as well. Don't get pets you wont love and dont dress your pets up, and then take pictures of them looking miserable and post them on facebook.
    Adios Pantalones likes this.
  12. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    People give rabbits, ducks, chickens, etc away (or for cheap) on Craig's List pretty often. They get tired of dealing with them I guess. What is wrong with raising them for food? Do you not eat meat or eggs?
  13. Badfish740

    Badfish740 Minister of Fire

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    When you're eating someone's unwanted pet do you ever give any thought to what the animal might have been given in terms of vaccinations/drugs/etc...since it was never intended to be eaten? That's part of the reason that horsemeat is such a scandal. Ethical arguments aside, there are plenty of shady horsemeat dealers who will take horses from anywhere, such as retired racehorses that have been doped up with all manner of performance enhancing drugs/antibiotics/steroids/painkillers and who-knows-what.
    Adios Pantalones likes this.
  14. Fod01

    Fod01 Feeling the Heat

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    We had a couple Dutch rabbits when I was a kid. They spent most of their lives in their hutch. One lived a long semi neglected life. The other was given away.

    A couple years ago we adopted a lop eared from a family with an allergic mother. He was house broken and had the run of most of the first floor of the house. He was a good pet but not nearly as interactive as our dog.

    We are good pet owners. That 'free' bunny cost us about a grand after getting him fixed and taking care of other ailments....
    northwinds and Adios Pantalones like this.
  15. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    That time of year again, if not a little late.

    My BIL found some baby bunnies in the backyard the other day, and the Easter discussion came up :rolleyes:
  16. Bobbin

    Bobbin Minister of Fire

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    I have no problem eating rabbit. But I have very big problem with people who acquire animals "for fun" and then fail utterly to tend to their needs properly (think about parrots!). This is a great post! I frankly had no idea a rabbit could live 11 yrs.. I've never had a rabbit and prolly never will. But I learned something today.

    Does anyone else remember when they would dye chicks and bunnies pink, mint green, and lavender to increase their "appeal"? I do!
  17. hossthehermit

    hossthehermit Minister of Fire

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    bunny.jpg
  18. yooperdave

    yooperdave Minister of Fire

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    No disrespect intended to the OP but...My two children (adults now) told me that getting rabbits for Easter was the best! Lived in an even more rural area in those days. Just saying, don't pass up a chance to make some great memories.
  19. Bobbin

    Bobbin Minister of Fire

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    Hoss., Lol.

    I've met exactly one "house rabbit" (so far) and wasn't impressed. But, I was savvy enough to know that maybe his "owners" didn't put much effort into "enriching" his life. Hindsight has bolstered that thought.

    We derive delight from our pets in proportion to the amount of enrichment we provide them!
    Adios Pantalones likes this.
  20. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    I guess the point is- would you be ok with buying a kid a dog, not getting proper vet care, and keeping it in a cage it's whole life? The kid may have loved it, but I'm not sure we can't do better.
  21. hossthehermit

    hossthehermit Minister of Fire

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    But the cows and chickens and turkeys that are created in the supermarket are better ........
    Mrs. Krabappel likes this.
  22. Bobbin

    Bobbin Minister of Fire

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    I'm not much for bunnies. Dogs?... not at the top of my list (but the fool dog has shown me the "way"). But, I'm all about cats. Love them, and firmly believe in spay/neuter, vaccination of feral populations. MAKE LESS KITTENS! (it takes 3 mos, to brew the next batch). SPAY / NEUTER!

    They're wonderful pets (you're late to party, Adios!) but they become "vermin" in pretty short order when the mantra of "spay/neuter" goes unheard. Our neutered cats have always been allowed o go outdoors, but they're "in" at night. And that's where they want to be.
    firefighterjake likes this.
  23. Badfish740

    Badfish740 Minister of Fire

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    Is that you Nate? ;lol
  24. yooperdave

    yooperdave Minister of Fire

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    I am not ok with that type of scenario. Why do you assume that is what happens? The rabbits were cared for by both children under mine and ex's supervision.
    There are many choices and ways to enrich a child's life. Pet ownership is one way.
  25. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    Not neutering a female leads to 80% chance of ovarian cancer. When cared for properly they live as long as a dog- one of mine lived to eleven and the other two to twelve. Rabbits require somewhat different care than most folks realize- maybe not as much an issue if they are raised to be eaten young. If I had a dog that only lived 4-5 years, I would be very curious what happened- but most pet rabbits will live much abbreviated lives.

    Just about everyone puts them in a hutch most of the day- when they have room, you might be surprised at their personalities- it is very analogous to keeping a dog in a cage.

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