1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

change power companies in PA?

Post in 'The Green Room' started by maverick06, Dec 1, 2012.

  1. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2008
    Messages:
    3,665
    Loc:
    Eastern Central PA
    In any case utility produced power is a bargain and very hard to reproduce for the price SO FAR. If solar gets much better or wind more commonly available that may change the dynamic.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,036
    Loc:
    New Jersey USA
    From what I learned on this thread Wind is subsidized 2.2 cents per KWH, that's a big 20%+ and paid for by you know who: YOU. As for Solar, don't hold your breath. This is all more ethanol economics.

    I'm all for clean energy and that's hydro and nuclear for now. JCP&L used to be about 50% nuclear.
  3. BIGDADDY

    BIGDADDY Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    Messages:
    356

    12 year or 12 month lock on rate?
  4. BIGDADDY

    BIGDADDY Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    Messages:
    356
    I have Dominion.

    This may help you.


    Contact UsReport an Outage1-800-342-5775
    twitter facebook google-plus youtube
    HomeMy AccountAt Your ServiceSave Energy & MoneyAbout UsSign In

    Enter Keywords
    At Your Service
    Print Email Share
    How to Choose
    Related Links
    Understanding Your Electric Bill
    PA Power Switch
    Generation Supplier List
    PPL Alerts
    What am I choosing?

    Think in terms of the three steps involved in getting electricity to your home or business.

    Generation: Making electricity.
    Transmission: Moving electricity from where it's made to the wires that supply your neighborhood.
    Distribution: Delivering electricity to your home or business through the network of wires that supplies your neighborhood.
    You can choose a company to handle Steps 1 and 2. PPL Electric Utilities continues to handle Step 3.

    Price to Compare

    The Price to Compare helps you evaluate offers from electricity generation suppliers to find out if you can save money.
    It is the price per kilowatt-hour you pay PPL Electric Utilities for generation and transmission if you don't switch to another supplier. If a supplier's price is lower than ours, you could save by switching.
    The Price to Compare represents 65 to 70 percent of a typical residential customer’s bill.
    The Price to Compare does not represent your total electric bill because it does not include distribution charges. PPL Electric Utilities continues to deliver your power and charge you for distribution service whether you switch or not.
    Distribution charges cover our costs to maintain the meters, poles, wires and other equipment required for reliable service.
    Pricing Updates

    Our price to compare changes every three months to reflect current market prices for electric supply. It changes on March 1, June 1, Sept. 1 and Dec. 1 each year.

    We will provide estimates of the new prices here on our website. Actual prices will be available about 10 days before they go into effect.

    Supplier prices can change at any time. In addition, new suppliers and offers may emerge periodically. Visit PA Power Switch in the Related Links box on this page to see other supplier offers and compare them to our price.

    Note: Alternative suppliers are not required to change prices for existing customers. If your supplier lowers their rate after you sign up, you will have to call them to request a change to the new rate.

    Subscribe to this News Feed
    Price to Compare

    CURRENT
    Residential
    Dec. 1 to Feb. 28, 2013
    7.544
    cents p/kWh*
    Small Business
    Dec. 1 to Feb. 28, 2013
    10.206
    cents p/kWh*
    * These are the price to compare rates for most residential and small business customers. Click here for a complete list of price to compare information for all rate schedules.
    Price to Compare

    FUTURE (ESTIMATE)
    Residential
    March 1 to May 31, 2013
    7.275
    cents p/kWh*
    Small Business
    March 1 to May 31, 2013
    8.921
    cents p/kWh*
    * These are the price to compare rates for most residential and small business customers. Click here for a complete list of price to compare information for all rate schedules.

    Choose Your Supplier
    How to Choose
    Power Purchase Options for Businesses
    Information for Generation Suppliers
    Outage Center
    Investing in Your Service
    Electrical Safety
    Electric Rates & Rules
    For Business Customers
    For Contractors and Builders
    For Generation Suppliers
    Interact With Us
    On Twitter
    On Facebook
    On Google+
    On YouTube
    Contact Us
    Feedback
    Recent Tweets
    We continually invest in infrastructure for our customers. We recently finished a 14-mile power line in Snyder & Northumberland counties.
    about a day ago
    Subscribe to Our Feeds
    Price To Compare
    E-power Trade Ally News
    REMSI for Contractors
    PR Newswire
    Corporate and Legal
    Terms of Use
    Privacy Policy
    PPL Corporation
    Careers
    Newsroom
    © 2012 PPL Electric Utilities Corporation. All rights reserved.
  5. woodgeek

    woodgeek Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,711
    Loc:
    SE PA
    Google turned up this link... http://maketheswitchusa.com/nj/

    It seems to think JCP&L costs 10.72 cents/kWh, and suggests "Commerce Energy" which offers a 12 mo contract at 9 cents, or a 15% reduction. An unknown is whether JCP&L charges you a cancellation fee for switching from them...I would think not but you would want to check/call them.

    Looks like you CAN buy green power by paying a surcharge to Commerce, details here http://www.njcleanenergy.com/renewa...npower-choice-program/start-today/start-today

    The cheapest one is 50% Wind and 50% hydro for a 2 cent surcharge. So, in principle you can get 'green' power for 0.3 cents/kWh more than you are nominally paying now.

    But unlike ethanol, wind is significantly energy positive and not as hard on the environment as growing corn. And unlike solar, turbines can deliver power cheaper than many FF sources (whose prices are, ahem, also effectively subsidized)....unsubsidized grid parity for wind was reached in many (but not all) markets 10 years ago. If the 2.2 cent subsidy doesn't get renewed going forward, we will see if wind power will 'sink or swim' on its own.
  6. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,036
    Loc:
    New Jersey USA
    Woodgeek,

    Thanks your input is always helpful and interesting to me and others, I am sure. Also: "(whose prices are, ahem, also effectively subsidized)." Amen! And usually to the determent of the free market. I am cheering for wind power to survive whatever the government involvement, but I remain an observer in my private practice, I can't even get up the energy to do some solar water heating - and even if just done the 9 months a year on doesn't have to protect against freezing temperatures one could easily recover the cost in a year or two, less if DIY.

    But I diverge, again.. I got another electric power offer in the mail, it is connected to United Airlines, I can always use a few addition miles on my UA (once Continental) account.

    Happy New Year
  7. maverick06

    maverick06 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Messages:
    724
    Loc:
    media, pa
    ok, so I started the thread, so I can have the sidebar haha!
    I just checked the link and it shows that for me, the power currently provided is 40 nuclear! Thats pretty cool. Did you also know that about 40% of all nuclear power provided is actually from burning old soviet nuclear weapons. There is very little press on this, it didnt want to be perceived as if the nuclear plants were bombs, just a few articles. The US bought them, reprocessed the fuel into commercial grade fuel, and provided them to the industry. I have no idea how the costs worked, probably all paid by the us govt. But to get rid of the russian's weapons, thats a pretty good deal. So think about that. My christmas tree is in front of me, burning 600 watts of power. 96 watts of which are from megatons that were aimed at where i work.

    I think we won :)
  8. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,036
    Loc:
    New Jersey USA
    Yep, and we decommissioned many more USA weapons than did the Russians, a policy we seem to still be following. More interesting might be how much of the bomb decommissioned stuff producing electric power is from Russia and how much from USA weapons. Whatever it cost us, better in our hands than on the world terrorist market. From the Iran news I have concluded weapons grade nuclear fuel takes more processing, so what has to be done to bring it back to industry grade fuel - and where did the stuff taken out go?

    Isn't it interesting the Russians were (are) yet making a profit on the "end" of the cold war, and still find it necessary to ban adoption of Russian orphans by USA families.... just another example of Russian/USA cooperation. Much more of this and they'll end up winning.
  9. woodgeek

    woodgeek Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,711
    Loc:
    SE PA
    For enriched Uranium...the stuff taken out is depleted uranium...to 'unprocess', you just mix it back in...dilute the enriched stuff with depleted or unprocessed, natural U.
  10. maverick06

    maverick06 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Messages:
    724
    Loc:
    media, pa
  11. Laszlo

    Laszlo New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2013
    Messages:
    26
    Loc:
    Pennsylvania
    Thanks for pointing them out to me. Much better find than what comes up on the PApowerSwitch site, both for long-term fixed prices, and for 100% wind. Plus they claim taxes are already included in their price, unlike some of the competition.

    Any issues or surprises since your switch? I'm thinking of signing on for a 3-year fixed rate of 8.28¢/kWh (compared to PECO @ 8.69¢).
  12. woodgeek

    woodgeek Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,711
    Loc:
    SE PA
    I am yet to see the new contract in my bill....I think the switch happened last week, but I won't see that bill until march.
  13. greg13

    greg13 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2012
    Messages:
    442
    Loc:
    CNY
    In NY They started allowing outside Energy suppliers a few years ago and from what I have seen and heard so far no one SAVES much money by switching providers and it turns into a major hassle when you try to switch back. The local TV stations have done many news segments on the subject.
  14. johnny1720

    johnny1720 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Messages:
    195
    Loc:
    The Great North East
    I changed almost 2 years ago, i got a report from the energy company last week. They said I saved $32.00 in the last 12 months, IMHO not worth it but it has been a seem-less change for me and my family.
  15. muncybob

    muncybob Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2008
    Messages:
    1,997
    Loc:
    Near Williamsport, PA
    I have not saved much either, but we are not big users of electricity. I do consider a change when they make a special offer such as a $50 credit, etc. and there is no termnation fee.
  16. Hearth Mistress

    Hearth Mistress Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    852
    Loc:
    Pt Pleasant, PA (SE PA)
    My latest bill from Met-ed has a "compare other supplier rate" at .089. Since we don't use a lot of electric, I've never even thought of looking. We've been here just over 10 years and have ony had an electric bill over $100 a few times, either really cold pre-stove months or really hot AC mobths. We are on a "fixed" plan $78 a month and every 3 months they review our bill and change it accordingly. Right now I pay $78 a month but only use about $55 so that extra money gets credited to my account and I can either leave it there, for higher months, like Summer when the AC is on, or get a refund. While this payment arrangement may not work for everyone, I don't mind it.
  17. Redbarn

    Redbarn Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2012
    Messages:
    199
    Loc:
    SE PA
    We switched from Met-Ed at 0.089 to Reliance at 0.069. Took about 30 minutes on-line and we fixed the rate for 1 year.

    Everything else is the same as before. Same billing,etc..
    We just pay less for the same product/service.
    Not many things in life go down in price !
  18. Hearth Mistress

    Hearth Mistress Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    852
    Loc:
    Pt Pleasant, PA (SE PA)
    I never heard of them, just googled it. No thanks, India has taken enough jobs out if the US. Unless there is another Reliance Energy, they are based in Mumbai.
  19. Redbarn

    Redbarn Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2012
    Messages:
    199
    Loc:
    SE PA
    My mistake.
    Reliant Energy
    Houston, TX
  20. Hearth Mistress

    Hearth Mistress Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    852
    Loc:
    Pt Pleasant, PA (SE PA)
    Ok, just looked. you lucked out, not so much here.

    The quote for my zip code is .879 for 12 months but that doesn't include the "distribution fees" that my current supplier will tack on to the bill for Reliant to use their infrastructure to get 3rd party electric to my house. Not sure what these fees are but being that close to what I'm paying now, it just doesn't seem worth it, especially since I'm sure after 12 months the "honey moon, thanks for switching" rate would go up so I'd be right back to looking around again.

    It was worth a look though, thanks for sharing.
  21. woodgeek

    woodgeek Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,711
    Loc:
    SE PA
    HM--the distribution rate from MetEd should be broken out on your current bill. It should also have a 'price to compare' on it to allow you to, um, compare the generation prices.
  22. woodgeek

    woodgeek Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,711
    Loc:
    SE PA
    Ok, got my first electric bill that reflects my new contract. No surprises. PECO is charging me the same customer fee ($7.17 flat) and distribution fee (4.25 cents/kWh) as in my previous bill. Neglecting the customer fee, my price per kWh was 12.9 cents total in Jan, now it is 12.7. All as expected.

    Feb is a high use month for me, 2700 kWh, so I saved a whopping $5.

    But the new supplier is 100% PA wind, so I dropped the CO2 associated with last month's usage by >1 metric ton. :p

    As for price trends, the 24 mo contract I took in Dec is now priced 0.1 cents cheaper....I could have saved $7.50 last month instead of $5! ;hm
    Redbarn likes this.
  23. Redbarn

    Redbarn Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2012
    Messages:
    199
    Loc:
    SE PA
    There seems to be a strong Zip code factor.

    I pulled out our Met Ed Bill for February.
    Customer charge was $8.11. Supplier fee $3.45 cents per kWh.
    For 839 kWh of use at a saving of 2 cents per kWh, we saved $16.78 in Feb.
    Even if the price goes back up after the 12 month contract period ends, well worth the effort of an hour at most online.

    We have multiple bills as we have a separate bill for our outbuildings.
    So we have multiple saving.

    The lower rates do make financial case for fitting solar panels to the barn less attractive but as the price of PV panels, microinverters and other Solar hardware continues to fall, it slightly eases the pain of waiting.
    woodgeek likes this.
  24. Hearth Mistress

    Hearth Mistress Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    852
    Loc:
    Pt Pleasant, PA (SE PA)
    The price to compare is .089 on my bill, so Without going back an looking at my bill, the Reliant .0879 rate, plus the distribution rate, which is a few cents, would mostly likely put me over what I pay now, so with Met-Ed I stay ;)
  25. woodgeek

    woodgeek Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,711
    Loc:
    SE PA
    The 'price to compare' strips out the distribution charge for an 'apples to apples' comparison. The distribution charge is the same whether you buy from MetEd or not.

    Your reliant rate doesn't look right. I looked up your options for your zipcode and MetEd at pappowerswitch:

    http://www.papowerswitch.com/shop-for-electricity/shop-for-your-home/

    and got a 7.6 cent quote from Reliant and a 6.9 cent quote from 'Washington Gas Energy Svcs', which would save you 1.3 or 2 cents/kWh net, equivalent to a 10 or 15% reduction of your current bill.
    Redbarn likes this.

Share This Page