Combustion Blower Bearing

Stevekng Posted By Stevekng, Feb 20, 2013 at 12:50 PM

  1. Stevekng

    Stevekng
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 21, 2007
    358
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    Loc:
    Central Maine
    Well, I had another combustion blower motor bearing go bad(started squealing). I had saved the one I swapped out from the last time one went(three years ago).I have a new one on the way($214.00).I'm going to take out the bearing on the one that's squealing and see if I can get a part number. Maybe there's an equivalent bearing that's more durable at high temps. I think that's what's causing the bearing to crap out; high temp is drying out the lube inside. In the mean time has anyone out there investigated this before?
    I have experience with replacing bearings and assembling components, so if this pans out, maybe I'll start an online service retrofitting blower motor bearings that will hold up longer.;)
     
  2. Roadstar

    Roadstar
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    Mar 11, 2011
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    I feel your pain, really.
    My Breckwell uses Fasco motors. I have no luck with my combustion blowers lasting more than two years. I blame it on the sealed bearings ‘cause my combustion blower is 18 years old and does not have sealed bearings. It gets oiled every year.

    When you say, “high temp is drying out the lube inside”, you mean because of 24/7 operation and not air temp, huh.

    I tried to take my motor apart but I could never remove the hex set screw inside the squirrel cage. I thought I was going to bust my Allen wrench.

    I found a few sites on the Internet with videos that showed how to oil a sealed bearing but since I couldn't get the squirrel cage off it was a no go.

    Good luck with your bearing replacement endeavor.
     
  3. ewdudley

    ewdudley
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    Nov 17, 2009
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  4. Roadstar

    Roadstar
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    Mar 11, 2011
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    Grease, adhesive?

    Thanks, I'll pass.
     
  5. ewdudley

    ewdudley
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    Nov 17, 2009
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    Ignorance is its own punishment.
     
  6. tjnamtiw

    tjnamtiw
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    Mar 9, 2009
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    What you really need is a bearing with a 'looser' tolerance between the bearings and the races. That way, as they expand from heat there is clearance left and they don't tighten up. I used to replace bearings in my gas fired furnace that had a forced exhaust with bearings like that. In fact, I replaced them for about 6 others in the development. I wish I could find them now. It was a special high temp bearing but not all that expensive. I believe most bearings used in our blowers are the same size as skateboard bearings but it would be nice if we had a locked thread that contained bearing numbers for various brands and components. We could all put a set on the shelf then. 8mm x 22mm x 7mm wide = 608 part number
     
  7. Dinger

    Dinger
    Burning Hunk 2.
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    Nov 23, 2011
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    Most greases have adhesive and cohesive properties. Cohesive so they stick to themselves, and adhesive so they stick to the thing they're protecting.

    Most cartridge bearings come pre packed with "grease" that at best, is Vaseline. Any hi-temp wheel bearing grease would be better than that stuff, and its quite easy to pull the seals (I use xacto) and repack them 1/3 to 2/3 full. If you can find one with "moly" even better, as this will add an extra layer of pro incase the grease deteriorates.

    FWIW, even the lowest rated hi temp greases are good to about 375 degrees. Not likely you're hitting that.
     
  8. Roadstar

    Roadstar
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    Mar 11, 2011
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  9. Stevekng

    Stevekng
    Feeling the Heat 2.
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    Oct 21, 2007
    358
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    Loc:
    Central Maine
    I found a site thate sells bearings that are made out of composite material.(plastic). The bearings are maintenence free and will stand up to 302 degrees. I have a feeling that they are too pricey because they make contact them for the cost. Inn the mean time, I'm going to pull out the old bearing and get a part number. I can sisive the O.D., I.D., and thickness to get a part number. I have a feeling that the OEM bearing will be alot cheaper than $200. I have the means to replace the bearing and clean the motor, so if I can refurbish the critter for say, $50 in parts and my labor, then it will be worthwhile to set up an online rebuild service.:cool:
     
  10. SmokeyTheBear

    SmokeyTheBear
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    Nov 10, 2008
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    Which 302 degrees? Fahrenheit or Celsius and yes it makes a difference, a huge difference. 302::C would be usable but 302::Fwouldn't.
     
  11. Stevekng

    Stevekng
    Feeling the Heat 2.
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    Oct 21, 2007
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    Here's a link to the mfr. It's 302 Fahrenheit . I don't think the unit gets to that temp. The bearing is pretty far removed from direct heat. I will get a thermoprobr and check it out.

    http://www.igus.com/wpck/default.aspx?Pagename=xiros_A500
     
  12. SmokeyTheBear

    SmokeyTheBear
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    Nov 10, 2008
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    Thermal cut out for a combustion blower is 475::F while the bearing may withstand normal conditions it will not withstand possible conditions under stress. Your call.
     
    heat seeker likes this.
  13. Stevekng

    Stevekng
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 21, 2007
    358
    53
    Loc:
    Central Maine
    I found another site that sells bearings rated up to 900 degrees F. I still think refurbishing with OEM bearings will be the best way to go, price wise. It will only take about a half hour to refurb a unit.
     

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