1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Last Night, I'd had it: Goodbye Defiant; Hello Mansfield!

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by swestall, Jan 7, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. struggle

    struggle Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2006
    Messages:
    727
    Loc:
    NW Iowa
    You are right about the stove getting hot quickly. What I do is on reload is to rake the coals to the front of the stove instead of leaving them spread out. It lenghtens the burn time and slows it down a bit. Can at any giving moment open the air control and raise the stack temp to above 1000degrees on the probe thermometer.

    I would strongly sugest a probe thermometer so you can see how it is doing for temps if you do not have one. Condor is the type I have. Installs without removing the pipe. 1/4 drill bit me thinks.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. swestall

    swestall Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2007
    Messages:
    1,015
    Loc:
    Connecticut
    Hello Again, In talking 8 hour burn times, we are getting 8 hours off the wood; the hot coal stage is much longer. In fact I don't have a clue about that since I'm reloading after 8-9 hours. At 8 hours we have stovetop of 200-250 no problem; in fact those temps stay for quite a while longer. It doesn't take much to get back up to the 300+ area after that either.
    The other day we let the coals burn down a bit, by opening it wide in the coal stage. The stovetop stayed at 275+ and if you considered the time from burn start till we reloaded it was about 12 hours.
    Hope that clarifies it a bit.
    And, I do have a probe, I just haven't installed it yet. When I put in the Mansfield I went to a double wall SS stovepipe which means I have to drill two different size holes to mount it. Just haven't had time to get to that yet; but I will.
    I just have nothing but good things to say at this point. Do they call this Soap-side: Heaven?
  3. rmcfall

    rmcfall Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Messages:
    308
    Do you mean you still have wood in the stove after 8 hours...that you have some flame after 8 hrs?

  4. rmcfall

    rmcfall Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Messages:
    308
    So if I understand correctly, your main living areas (kitchen, dining, family areas) are all in one larger open area, with the stove being almost centrally located. And then you have 6 rooms (3 up and down) that are detached from the open area, but they are still heated by the stove? If I understand your layout correctly, I am impressed that you can maintain temps in those rooms at the rear of the house (particularly the ones on the first floor) without overheating the main living areas.

  5. jpl1nh

    jpl1nh Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2007
    Messages:
    1,572
    Loc:
    Newfields NH
    Swestall, so glad the change has gone so well for you. The soapstone stoves are great if you just keep them going. While the Woodsocks are cat stoves and yours is secondary burn they both give great, even, long term heat. Last night it was 18 when I loaded at 10PM, 71 in the house, filled it full and tight with mostly very good hard wood but some middling stuff too like red maple and a small piece of hemlock. Got it going, engaged cat, shut it down in a couple of stages and went to bed. Woke up at 6AM, it was 6 outside and 68 inside. That's heating about 1000 sq ft with a cathedral ceiling and skylights in the living room with a 1.5 cu ft firebox! Stovetop was 300 with a hearty coal bed inside. Love my soapstone. I know they aren't for everybody or every situation but those of us that have them love them.
  6. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    9,138
    Loc:
    base of Mt. Rainier on the wet side, WA
    Ugh, you have to drill two differnt sized holes for double wall? I suppose that would have been obvious but you had better get those holes concentric or else your thermometer will be looking sideways. Do you drill the holes in the one side only? I would assume so and that the probe just sticks there in the pipe like a nail.
  7. swestall

    swestall Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2007
    Messages:
    1,015
    Loc:
    Connecticut
    First hole is the larger one, the little adaptor goes through it, they say 1/4 inch but just a bit smaller will make a tighter fit. the second hole is for the probe itself, I don't recall the size, just hold it up to the drill to match size, Use a little center punch to start the drill (finish nail will do if you don't have one) and you are just looking to make a little ding so the drill won't walk on you.
    Then in goes the adaprtor and the proble follows with the magnet on it.
  8. marc nichols

    marc nichols New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Messages:
    31
    Loc:
    Sierra Nevada foothills @3000 ft
    Swestall,

    so I see you arrived where I did...the everburn out the door. Junk! Too bad your dealer didn't step up as mine did, for which I'm very grateful.

    I opted for another VC Encore, but the CAT version designed by the original VC company. I don't think the quality is the same, but I'm hoping the technology is in tact and I love the look of the stove. Unfortunately, the everburn creosoted my system badly and after a flue fire (this all caught me by surprise and initiated the swap), I have a seriously clogged chimney cap to resolve. Given the weather and height of the chimney, it will be another week before the chimney sweep can be here to rectify. From what I did experience briefly, this CAT unit is a horse of an entirely different color and I'm hopeful it will fulfill my needs.

    Saw discussion of a "secondary air probe". can anyone tell me what this is, where it goes and where to get one? If it measures temps behind the cat, I'd be very interested in monitoring that. No more creosote for me...

    Marc
  9. jetmech

    jetmech Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2007
    Messages:
    210
    Loc:
    Dillsburg PA
    Marc, the secondary air probe controls a air shutter in the rear of the stove through a coil spring. It senses temp of the stove and opens or closes the shutter or flap what ever you call it to control stove temp. I belive it is always open somewhat. it is totally temp operated not controllable by hand.
  10. marc nichols

    marc nichols New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Messages:
    31
    Loc:
    Sierra Nevada foothills @3000 ft
    OK, I understand that. For some reason I thought this was an operator viewable temp probe.

    Thanks for the clarification.
  11. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    2,430
    Loc:
    Halifax, VA
    Pictures, pictures, pictures!

    Attached Files:

  12. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    2,430
    Loc:
    Halifax, VA
    And more pictures!

    Attached Files:

  13. bebopin

    bebopin New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    Messages:
    78
    Loc:
    Wisconsin
    Just looking at that makes me warmer.Cannot wait for my install to be done and start having that at home.Phil
  14. AndyD1480

    AndyD1480 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2008
    Messages:
    31
    Loc:
    Vernon, CT
    Awesome stove man! I've been following most of your posts and responses regarding this stove. It's been invaluable in helping me lock into my Heritage's sweet spot!

    Now I've just gotta get the Fiance' to reload when she gets home and we'll have some great 24 hour burning going!!!
  15. Harley

    Harley Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    997
    Loc:
    Ashfield, MA
    Looks great!!

    I bet that baby will be keeping the house nice and toasty
  16. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    9,138
    Loc:
    base of Mt. Rainier on the wet side, WA
    Looks good, even the ecofan is spinning so you must have had a good stove top temp.

    I've got an odd HS specific question. How did you attach the first section of pipe/adapter/whatever to the stove's collar? I see you have an adapter piece in there with no damper but I can't see how it attaches to the HS non-predrilled collar.

    Nice place.
  17. DriftWood

    DriftWood Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2006
    Messages:
    718
    Loc:
    Bluewater Area, Great Lakes
    Why did you go to the double wall?
    Seemes like a lot of heat could come off the single wall if it was there instead.
  18. Harley

    Harley Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    997
    Loc:
    Ashfield, MA
    That's strange, HB... unless I misread.... are you talking about the reversable collar on your Heritage? Mine does have 3 pre-drilled holed in the cast collar.
  19. jpl1nh

    jpl1nh Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2007
    Messages:
    1,572
    Loc:
    Newfields NH
    S, the stove looks beautiful!! but I really think you need to upgrade your woodrack to something larger. :p
  20. Jefflee1

    Jefflee1 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2006
    Messages:
    42
    Loc:
    Willington CT
    Hey AndyD1480

    Where did you get your stove from, I am looking to go with a soapstone stove? I am over in Willington

    Jeff
  21. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,737
    Loc:
    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    Nice looking install, but aren't those racks awful close to the stove? - I thought NFPA said you were supposed to have 48" to non-wall combustibles? (I'll admit I think that's a bit much for firewood that gets rotated through fairly fast, but... I'll even admit that I keep mine closer than that, but not as close as yours is...)

    Gooserider
  22. AndyD1480

    AndyD1480 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2008
    Messages:
    31
    Loc:
    Vernon, CT
    Jefflee1, hey I dont want to hi-jack the thread so I sent you a PM.
  23. jpl1nh

    jpl1nh Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2007
    Messages:
    1,572
    Loc:
    Newfields NH
  24. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    48,334
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    The Mansfield has an 18" side clearance to combustibles. It's hard to tell from the pictures, but it does look like only about 8-10 inches to the closest wood in the hoop.

    Did you mean NFPA clearance to combustibles for unrated stoves is 36 inches?
  25. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    9,138
    Loc:
    base of Mt. Rainier on the wet side, WA
    I think I am in error Harley, the collar did have holes now that you mention it but they were not spaced to line up with the premade holes in the double wall. HS told me that I would have to drill new ones. The installer and the inspector said it wan't required or needed so my double wall slip piece is only twist locked at the ceiling and then screwed together at the slip joint, setting on the collar.

    The wife has the heritage at 550 right now which is higher than I like. Setting a record.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page