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Looking for a 4 wedge splitter

Post in 'The Gear' started by kwikrp, Dec 27, 2008.

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  1. kwikrp

    kwikrp Feeling the Heat

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    I have a troy bilt 27 ton splitter was wondering if I can put a 4 way splitting wedge on it ? Any advise or suggestions?

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  2. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Normally 4-way wedges are used on splitters where the wedge is stationary and the ram moves the wood. The wood coming off the wedge is nowhere near the beam, just out in the air. On your splitter I believe it's the opposite. A 4-way moving wedge would tend to push the wood toward the beam and toward the side supports.
  3. cityevader

    cityevader New Member

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    I just got my Northern Tool $80 4-way I asked for for Christ-mas.
    I have wedge on ram and will take them both to work on Monday to the blowtorch in order to spread the "rear retaining strap" to fit over my very wide wedge. (Harbor Freight 30-ton).
    It will reduce the 24-inch stroke to about 20 inches, which is absolutely perfect to match my stove. I hate it when I struggle to get a too-long-split into the fire unsuccessfully and have to pull the smoldering thing back out!
    Recommended from the "other forum"...the wedge can't possibly jam wood against the beam due to the fact that it slips on. So any force of grain pattern would simply lift the wedge maybe a 1/2" tops.
  4. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    If you shorten the stroke by adding length to the ram, then fully extended it would probably bottom out and could be dangerous if not paying attention. Most of the wood that I split, succumbs to the wedge after only a few inches of stroke so bottoming out would only be an issue when working with stringy or crotch wood.
  5. cityevader

    cityevader New Member

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    I ended up cutting rear strap vertically and spreading it and welding a cross-piece on top. I'll get a picture soon. Only issue was the difference in wedge angles tending to sometimes wedge the wedge against the wedge. I split close to half cord of stringy Locust today. Man is it so much faster with the 4-way! Only 4 times did I have to stop the return stroke to bang a stuck piece. If the angle of the original wedge wasn't so fat, the slip-on would slide upwards easier as a piece goes below the wings...but very mild issue at best.

    Very true, It certainly does bottom out....but that is only when I let it, trying to get the last of the "strings" separated. Long term affects of constant bottoming out, such as a bent toeplate or cracked weld, are possible so I'll just not bottom it out. Easy enough to watch what you're doing.
  6. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Say that ten times really fast. %-P

    I look forward to seeing the pic.
  7. carbon neutral

    carbon neutral Feeling the Heat

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    I made my own 4 way slip on wedge for my 22 ton HF splitter. It works real well and definitely saves time. I was surprised that a 22 ton splitter could drive the 4 way but it does without issue. It does reduce the effective stroke but none of my wood burning appliances can accomodate more than 23" and I cut for 20" so it isn't an issue for me. I would reccomend you only put an angle on the top side of the horizontal wedge plane. By doing this it insures that the wood on the bottom isn't being driven into the beam. Hard to describe but if pictures help let me know and I will post some.
  8. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Pics would be nice. I get what you mean about the bottom of the wedge being parallel with the beam.

    Shortening the stroke would save cycle time. The auto-return fully retracts the ram so you have to wait for the wedge to reach the log.
  9. cityevader

    cityevader New Member

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    Finally the first normal day after the holidays, so here are some pics. In the bottom view you'll see the "strap" that was cut and spread open and a cross-piece welded on. In the top view, you'll notice the difference in wedge angles which sometimes gets them stuck. Nothing a good whach with a split won't knock loose.

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  10. cityevader

    cityevader New Member

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    remaining pics

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  11. cityevader

    cityevader New Member

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    I agree that if I was making this from scratch, absolutely, only the top of the wings would be beveled. That would eliminate all issues with the thing...well, not counting of course having similar bevels between both wedes. But I have neither the time nor desire to do make my own. $80 is a decent value I think.

    After 1/3 cord, it only kicked down into second stage pressure on a three way crotch. It just sliced it's way through to the end no problem.
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