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Riteway Model 2000

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by BobCat, Jun 5, 2008.

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  1. BobCat

    BobCat New Member

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    I recently purchased a Riteway mdl 2000 1982 model wood stove. The stove is brand new, never used but has been in storage since 1982. As is, there is no firebrick liner. My question is: what is required for lining this stove or if it is designed to be used as is? I have had trouble finding any info or specs on this model.

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  2. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    It should be evident inside as to whether it had firebrick in it - there would be angles or brackets where it would have sat. I'm fairly sure earlier models of Riteways had firebrick in them, but perhaps they replaced them in later years.

    One guy here claims to have a old 2000.....
    http://hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/12155/

    maybe he knows something....
  3. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    The Riteway was essentially a tall thick steel can built just south of here in the welding hayday of stove builders in Harrisonburg, VA to feed the 70's stove craze. It didn't have firebrick lining and will crap up a chimney with creosote in a heartbeat.

    It'll heat up whatever you want to heat up, hopefully not the house you sleep in, but be sure and burn dry wood and clean the chimney often.
  4. TruePatriot

    TruePatriot New Member

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    BB,

    A good friend of mine heated his farmhouse with a Riteway, until he bought a Hearthstone Mansfield, several years ago. And it was a "tall, steel can...", as you say. It also ate a voracious amount of wood, if I recall correctly. His stove was from the 1970's, I'd say, if not earlier. He later offered it to me, for my cottage, but I declined--it was too tall for my fireplace installation and, quite honestly, I didn't see that it would be a big step up from my crappy, stamped-steel box stove--no offense to the O.P. (I need a new, Class A chimney to go "up and out," in the cottage, and then I can install any stove I want--probably a 30-NC/Summers Heat 50.

    Needless to say, my friend really likes his Hearthstone, and would never go back. (Personlly--and no offense to Heathstone owners like my friend, or to ANY owners of stoves put together with stove cement--because I'm lazy, I don't like any stove put together with stove cement, which can drop out, requiring a rebuild, which is why I only consider welded, steel plate stoves, but that is a topic for another thread).

    From what I've read here, some people are happy with a carefully-run "smoke dragon" from the 1970's, (in fact, that's what I'm still doing, in my cottage, but I am limited by the existing fireplace installation and the cost of a new stack) but for my money, I would think an inexpensive Englander 30-NC would be a massive step up from any 1970's technology.

    Just my .02--YMMV.

    Peter
  5. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos Minister of Fire

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    Hi Bobcat- I got two of the 2000's in my house. Mine are from the 70's and don't need liner bricks. Let 'em say what they will, I like them alot.
  6. brooktrout

    brooktrout New Member

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    I love my '87 Buckstove- a classic, as we refer to pre-epa stoves. Smoke dragons are the outside boilers.
  7. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Early riteways did have firebrick, but I am not familiar with the 2000 model. The reason I think this is true is that they could burn coal...some had shaker grates.

    And they were pretty much the first cross (or down) drafters which become popular. Used at a fairly decent clip, they could burn well. The problems with most older stoves occur when they are not used at high outputs.

    Given the size of the Riteway fireboxes, that means they were probably better suited to use as a furnace or basement heater - since very few people need that kind of heat in the living room!

    I have a page on the riteway in the wiki, as well as one on a copy, the cunningham. In this pic you can see the firebrick and the crossdraft design:
  8. TruePatriot

    TruePatriot New Member

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    Whoops! I'm sorry, I should have explained that I didn't mean to slam all Riteways, when I said this:

    I should have explained that because this particular Riteway had been badly overfired (probably repeatedly, knowing who used to rent the farmhouse before my friend moved in) that it was in rough shape. Panels were visibly warped, IIRC, and something had fallen out from inside it, due to warpage--can't remember what. I'm sure a non-abused Riteway would have been a big improvment over my crappy, stamped-steel box stove, actually, but a Riteway would still be too tall for that hearth.

    And that Riteway did heat that farmhouse for a lot of years, in winters that do get to -20 F or colder.

    Didn't mean to knock the whole line--just one poor, abused example.

    Peter
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