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Stainless Steel liner questions

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Trickle, Mar 6, 2013.

  1. Michael6268

    Michael6268 Feeling the Heat

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    422
    Loc:
    Grafton NH/Upper Valley
    Just seal the cleanout door with if your cleanout is outside. If its inside you can still seal it, but there wont be any real cold air coming from a inside cleanout door.

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  2. Premier Fireplace MI

    Premier Fireplace MI New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2013
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    Loc:
    Macomb Michigan
    I personally would do a knock out prior to trying to drop a liner. I would look into the Liners Olyimpia Chimney makes. They have a liner that is insulated and saves a ton of room. I have used it in the past and its great product. I hope the sweep was well before you took those pictures...
  3. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Next to nuke plant Berwick, PA.
    Sealing the clean out door does not mean the rest of the space below the T is sealed or air tight. If the old liner tiles are missing, cracked or broken, chances are the masonry isn't tight either. Unless the T is sealed tightly around also, anything open, cracked or untight above it will also let it draw cool air in also. Sorry, just a bad idea, again, as it has already proven to be issues with some folks on here that have had installers, "leave the T cap off" and have issues directly related to it.. Doing a half assed job anywhere on a wood or coal burning system is not something that would happen in this home, or suggested to any one else's.
    Feel free to rig your set up any way you want, but giving poor advice to others, that may potentially cause them issues or worse, is not a good practice. With these appliances, it is best to practice overkill, than cut corners.
    chimneylinerjames likes this.
  4. Michael6268

    Michael6268 Feeling the Heat

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    Nov 19, 2005
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    422
    Loc:
    Grafton NH/Upper Valley
    First off, "poor advice" comes staight from a well known liner supplier and one other supplier (dont remember the name right now)
    Second- what makes you an expert that knows more than the proffessional suppliers of chimney liners??
    Third- your chimney would have to be in seriously bad shape to "suck" the massive amounts of cold air you are talking about "up" through the bottom area/cleanout area. (orig post says "if area is "sound" below the T (not a hole the size of a manhole cover that you speak of)
    Fourth- please get your facts straight before using your "expertise": to decide wihat is "poor advice and half assed".
  5. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Nov 18, 2005
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    27,174
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    Northern Virginia
    Never leave the bottom cap off of a tee. I don't care who tells you too. A total draft killer and creosote factory. I don't care if the clean-out door is sealed or not.
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Have to agree with hog and BB on this one. It's a bad idea. Leave the tee cap screwed on and use a shop vac to clean out the tee after sweeping.
  7. fire_man

    fire_man Minister of Fire

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    Hog and BB are spot on. I don't care what any "professional supplier" (whatever that is) or "well known liner supplier" says.They have no idea the condition of any particular application, so it would be poor advice to generalize.

    The OP already stated the masonry and flue liner were cracked.
  8. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    6,674
    Loc:
    Next to nuke plant Berwick, PA.
    Many perfect points. Hopefully, someone tucked their false pride away, and open their mind to the possibility they were wrong, and gained some useful knowledge.
    There is no shame in being wrong, hell I am wrong many times in life, and will willingly admit so with no problem.
    In this case, I stand by my statement though.
    One other note....
    There are many "professional" suppliers of many things in this world. They are actually professional sales persons, and do not always necessarily know much about what they are selling, other than how to sell the product. There is a difference between knowing how to sell a product, and installing a product. I know what I know from several factors. Research on here, reading many manufacturers install manuals, and talking to many stove shops/dealers, and "sales" people. I gained the least amount of install knowledge from the "sales" persons. I have learned that many "professional" dealers actually know little about what they sell. But know how to give you any amount of false info or advise in an effort to sell you their product.
    Not all are this way, but a good many are.
    I said my thoughts, I'm on to other things. Good luck.

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