2015-2016 Blaze King Performance thread (Everything BK)

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BKVP

Minister of Fire
Okay....I might have screwed up. I did a hot reload and forgot to close my bypass....watched some t.v. might have been over an hour.....load door was latched and fresh air was turned down. Anticipated issues? Flue temp didn't get over 350....cat didn't stall and wood is 12%
What was so riveting on t.v.? Actually you should be fine. Just keep an eye on it in the future.....
 

Toiler

Member
Thanks for the replies. Here is the reverse 45 bend I referred to. It gives us a few more inches of clearance.


Seems the low is too low. If I set the damper to 2 as was suggested then the problem goes away, but a bit too hot in the room when it is above freezing.

Installer has decided a double wall would solve smoke leak problems, which only happen when the stove cools. Also going to add an air intake. Not sure if that will help increase the draft, but it is an easy install, so why not try!
We got our King King installed finally. It as about 6 feet of single wall pipe with two reverse 45 bends to the double wall that goes up another 20 feet or so.

I was away for a couple days so loaded the thing up as family was home and they reported smoke in the house. I believe the cat went under temp overnight at the 1 setting. It is mild here, a few degrees above freezing. The next night I was home, stoked it up around 11 PM and by 5 AM the converter was just bellow the "active" setting.

Does it matter if the catalytic converter goes inactive once bypassed? Or is it to warm to use it? How do you keep the Cat hot while dialed down?

My old stove was useless if nor super cold. This one is much more adjustable. Just got to figure out the back-smoke.

Also, we do not have the fresh air intake yet. House is not well sealed. Might this help?

Thanks.... tried a few google searches, but always wrong answers.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
14,894
Philadelphia
Your Jotul pan might have been bigger in size, but didn't hold more volume. What lid are you referring to? I've never had a Firelight, but the Oslo Ashpan system is by far the messiest I've ever used!
I never cared to measure, but I'd bet the Jotul Firelight pan held a lot more than you think. Just a fraction of an inch shallower than the Ashford pan, but at least 3x larger footprint. Can't speak to the Oslo, I don't do miniature anything.

Again, my Ashford ash pans do have lids. They're sitting in the drawers under the pan. Never used them, since my pan is not really useable, but they do have them.
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,280
Indiana
I never cared to measure, but I'd bet the Jotul Firelight pan held a lot more than you think. Just a fraction of an inch shallower than the Ashford pan, but at least 3x larger footprint. Can't speak to the Oslo, I don't do miniature anything.

Again, my Ashford ash pans do have lids. They're sitting in the drawers under the pan. Never used them, since my pan is not really useable, but they do have them.
The lid must be something new that I'm not aware of?
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,280
Indiana
I never cared to measure, but I'd bet the Jotul Firelight pan held a lot more than you think. Just a fraction of an inch shallower than the Ashford pan, but at least 3x larger footprint. Can't speak to the Oslo, I don't do miniature anything.

Again, my Ashford ash pans do have lids. They're sitting in the drawers under the pan. Never used them, since my pan is not really useable, but they do have them.
By the way, the #12 and the Oslo are practically the same size. The F-600 is substantially bigger than the #12 and the Oslo.
 

drz1050

Minister of Fire
Sep 11, 2014
791
Ballston Lake, NY
Ah, so it is! I didn't think there was anything down there.. the lid just sits on top of the pan, fits between the handle with a small gap on both sides.

For right now, I'm going to be shoveling into a galvanized steel can with a locking lid.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
14,894
Philadelphia
By the way, the #12 and the Oslo are practically the same size. The F-600 is substantially bigger than the #12 and the Oslo.
No, this is not correct. The F600 is actually made from the same exact castings as the Firelight 12, and in fact shares some of the same casting numbers. The only major casting change between the two was the removal of the top loader door. All other casting changes were either interior (rear burn plate), or minor additions such as threading bosses to the interior to hold the newer non-cat reburn components. Most castings are interchangeable between the Firelight 12 and the Firelight 600. The Oslo is a physically smaller stove. I have owned three Firelight 12's, and measured up the 600 as a possible replacement for it, before buying the Ashford 30's. I have also purchased Firelight 600 parts in the repair of Firelight 12's. There's a reason they kept the "Firelight" name, when the redesigned the internals of that stove.

From Jotul.com, the dimensions of the three:

Firelight 12: 29" w x 31" h x 26.5" d
Firelight 600: 29" w x 31" h x 26.5" d
Oslo: 28.25" w x 28.5" h x 27.25" d
 
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Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
14,894
Philadelphia
For right now, I'm going to be shoveling into a galvanized steel can with a locking lid.
Same here. I do not believe the ash pan is useable, as it is. This is a shame, as shoveling does produce dust. Hopefully they are able to resolve it.
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,280
Indiana
No, this is not correct. The F600 is actually made from the same exact castings as the Firelight 12, and in fact shares some of the same casting numbers. The only major casting change between the two was the removal of the top loader door. All other casting changes were either interior (rear burn plate), or minor additions such as threading bosses to the interior to hold the newer non-cat reburn components. Most castings are interchangeable between the Firelight 12 and the Firelight 600. The Oslo is a physically smaller stove. I have owned three Firelight 12's, and measured up the 600 as a possible replacement for it, before buying the Ashford 30's. I have also purchased Firelight 600 parts in the repair of Firelight 12's. There's a reason they kept the "Firelight" name, when the redesigned the internals of that stove.

From Jotul.com, the dimensions of the three:

Firelight 12: 29" w x 31" h x 26.5" d
Firelight 600: 29" w x 31" h x 26.5" d
Oslo: 28.25" w x 28.5" h x 27.25" d
The firebox depth is much deeper on the F-600, that's what I was referring to.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
14,894
Philadelphia
The firebox depth is much deeper on the F-600, that's what I was referring to.
I missed the conversational shift to Jotul Firelight firebox size. I thought we were talking about ash pans. ;)

Yes, firebox is deeper on F600, but a lot taller on the F12, due to all the reburn system being moved from above to behind. Overall firebox volume is pretty darn close between them, but what does comparing Jotul Oslo's to Jotul Firelights have to do with Ashford 30 ash pans?
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,280
Indiana
I missed the conversational shift to Jotul Firelight firebox size. I thought we were talking about ash pans. ;)

Yes, firebox is deeper on F600, but a lot taller on the F12, due to all the reburn system being moved from above to behind. Overall firebox volume is pretty darn close between them, but what does comparing Jotul Oslo's to Jotul Firelights have to do with Ashford 30 ash pans?
You said you can't speak for the Oslo because you "don't do miniature anything". As if the Oslo was much smaller. Didn't mean to get this thread derailed.
 
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Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
14,894
Philadelphia
I guess I don't really know the capacity of the Oslo, but it sure looks tiny standing next to a Firelight. I can say 100% the two Firelight models are identical in castings, and pretty close in firebox size, both measuring 2.85 - 3.0 cu.ft., depending on what you count as "usable space".

IIRC, Ashford 30 is 2.85 cu.ft. Not huge when compared to the King, although classified as a "large stove" on BK's site. It does get burn times at least 2x the Jotul Firelight 12's, and probably 3x the Firelight 600's, in my short experience. Last night, I loaded 7 splits. 24 hours later, that load was only 70% consumed, and this big old house was holding 72F. Amazing, I couldn't come anywhere close to that with the Firelights.

I ended up running the stove on high for about 4 hours, just to burn down the remaining splits and get to a sensible reload point. Cat never went out of active range, and I just did a hot reload at 28 hours with plenty left in the box.

I think I'm going to have to get used to just doing a lot of hot reloads, on this stove. With the Jotuls, that wasn't much of an issue, as they were always down to coals at the end of an average work day.
 
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Poindexter

Minister of Fire
Jun 28, 2014
2,063
Fairbanks, Alaska
Last night, I loaded 7 splits. 24 hours later, that load was only 70% consumed, and this big old house was holding 72F. Amazing, I couldn't come anywhere close to that with the Firelights.

I ended up running the stove on high for about 4 hours, just to burn down the remaining splits and get to a sensible reload point. Cat never went out of active range, and I just did a hot reload at 28 hours with plenty left in the box.

I think I'm going to have to get used to just doing a lot of hot reloads on this stove.
Welcome to the dark side Bwana.
 
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webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
10,280
Indiana
I guess I don't really know the capacity of the Oslo, but it sure looks tiny standing next to a Firelight. I can say 100% the two Firelight models are identical in castings, and pretty close in firebox size, both measuring 2.85 - 3.0 cu.ft., depending on what you count as "usable space".

IIRC, Ashford 30 is 2.85 cu.ft. Not huge when compared to the King, although classified as a "large stove" on BK's site. It does get burn times at least 2x the Jotul Firelight 12's, and probably 3x the Firelight 600's, in my short experience. Last night, I loaded 7 splits. 24 hours later, that load was only 70% consumed, and this big old house was holding 72F. Amazing, I couldn't come anywhere close to that with the Firelights.

I ended up running the stove on high for about 4 hours, just to burn down the remaining splits and get to a sensible reload point. Cat never went out of active range, and I just did a hot reload at 28 hours with plenty left in the box.

I think I'm going to have to get used to just doing a lot of hot reloads, on this stove. With the Jotuls, that wasn't much of an issue, as they were always down to coals at the end of an average work day.
That's what most people don't understand, when I say I reload once a day they think they can relate. No no no! I mean after 24 hours, not 8 or 10 hours and there are typically large coals or chunks of wood left in the thing!
 
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Poindexter

Minister of Fire
Jun 28, 2014
2,063
Fairbanks, Alaska
Have a set of tools I am happy enough with to share a pic.

Be advised I am not at all upset with BK here. My woodpile averages 18% this year, almost 50% more water in it than the 13% called for in the manual. Last year I was ecstatic with the stove but running wood as dry as called for.

I have been using the claw all week, its a keeper for me in my 18%MC tool set. Its real handy for wrangling coals bigger than a golf ball, and lifting coals out of the ashes so the coals rest on the ash bed instead of nestling down in the ashes. Also handy for stirring up the coals so the surface ash layer falls off and they get back to glowing and burning. I'll build a more permanent one of these, probably when the wood handle finally catches fire.

Test drove the scoop tonight finally. I last harvested ashes Saturday PM six days ago using last year's coals sorter. Stirring with the claw every reload through the week, I got about half my ash bed out from under the coals in maybe ten minutes tonight. I'll get the other half tomorrow.

I did toss maybe a pound of little tiny coals, but for now this will do. Look forward to hanging my 18% tools up in the back of the shed come June and not getting them out again for many seasons to come.

18% MC tool set, floor of the scoop is 6x6" nominal:

18pertools.JPG
 
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Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
14,894
Philadelphia
Be advised I am not at all upset with BK here.
Ditto. As much discussion as there has been about ash pans and plugs, and I do hope that BK is able to offer a better solution, the fact remains these stoves so vastly exceed the performance of any other brand as to eliminate any possible regret over this purchase. They have a superb product, and excellent support to back it up.
 

jeff_t

Minister of Fire
Sep 14, 2008
4,202
SE MI
We've pretty much settled on where to put a stove in this house, and it will most likely be an alcove install. I was sorta dragging my feet and waiting in Woodstock's next stove, but I guess side loading rules that one out. I looked at the Super 27, but my opening is about 2" too narrow.

Sooo, I thought I should look at the Sirocco 20. It fits. Then for grins I look at the 30. It fits better. The tighter side clearance of the 30 more than makes up for the extra width over the 20. The bigger stove can fit where the smaller stove can't.

Again, I wonder what the point is with the 20 series stoves.
 
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BKVP

Minister of Fire
We've pretty much settled on where to put a stove in this house, and it will most likely be an alcove install. I was sorta dragging my feet and waiting in Woodstock's next stove, but I guess side loading rules that one out. I looked at the Super 27, but my opening is about 2" too narrow.

Sooo, I thought I should look at the Sirocco 20. It fits. Then for grins I look at the 30. It fits better. The tighter side clearance of the 30 more than makes up for the extra width over the 20. The bigger stove can fit where the smaller stove can't.

Again, I wonder what the point is with the 20 series stoves.
Remember to include the needed space to access the controls on the left hand side....bypass, fan rheostat and thermostat control knob.
 

Poindexter

Minister of Fire
Jun 28, 2014
2,063
Fairbanks, Alaska
Got the second half of my ashes of the week harvested this morning in maybe five minutes.

I am going to rework the sifter a little bit, going to move the crease between back wall and floor so the back wall is a little taller and the floor correspondingly shorter, same width. Then I can cut the handle bolts down to length and file them smooth. Need to come up with some kind of hanging rings now that I know they work.

And I am cleared by the wife to upgrade my Anvil Shaped Object (ASO) to an actual anvil. Not sure how the neighbors will like it, but a firebrick friendly claw for the 18% MC tool family is first on the list come spring thaw. Shipping to Alaska on anvils is kinda of a bummer, but the used ones up here have been run hard, I am about to pay shipping on a new Peddinghaus. If you got a good one in the 100-250# range that you would let go for $2.00/ pound drop me a line.

I would add that I think I am finally on top of the learning curve for burning wood this wet. If you are an experienced BK user in the 18-22%MC range there will probably be some raised eyebrows and cussing involved when you get hold of a cord of 12-16%. 11% and under you got worry about blowing out the door glass if you turn the air down too fast - I am told. 12-16% is super easy to run, just RTFM.

17+% I have had to look at the stove with the book open instead of just the clock for best results.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
14,894
Philadelphia
Haven't even taken out my moisture content in the last two years, but I'm burning 2.5 year mixed oak and ash, and it's running like a dream. Based on what folks say about oak here, I'm assuming I'm no where near 12-16%, but I can't report having any trouble whatsoever.
 

TX-L

Burning Hunk
Sep 1, 2010
243
Tug Hill State Forest, NY
OK, not really a reply on the latest topic... But, here is a pic of conditions 26 hrs after last reload. Keep in mind that this image is with the coals raked forward and the air full open, and that stove top temps for most of the day were around 350 until I wrangled the coals
Outside temp all day was around 32F. Wood was entirely hard maple.
 

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Blazing

Feeling the Heat
Mar 2, 2015
272
VA
Loaded the princess insert tonight to the top. Gonna be "cold" well at least a good excuse to load it full. I did my normal full air burn then started working the air back in stages. To my delight for the first time ever I had the cat glowing bright enough I had to check to see why I had such a bright glow coming for the stove. My wood being lower in moisture content this year is already showing dividends and I owe it all to the wonderful people here!! Big thanks to all who have shown me the way to dry oak and BK stoves ;ex
 
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BKVP

Minister of Fire
OK, not really a reply on the latest topic... But, here is a pic of conditions 26 hrs after last reload. Keep in mind that this image is with the coals raked forward and the air full open, and that stove top temps for most of the day were around 350 until I wrangled the coals
Outside temp all day was around 32F. Wood was entirely hard maple.
Your cat therm is measuring exhaust gas temps. The other surface temps. Nothing looks concerning to me.
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
14,894
Philadelphia
The 30.1 is an amazing stove. Check the ash plug / pan relationship, if you want to use the ash pan. I have been blown away by the burn times.

On that note... I need to ask some advice of the group. My goal was to run one of my Ashford 30.1's on 12-hour cycles, and the other on 24-hour cycles, as it suits my work schedule. Unfortunately, and this is going to sound like a "humble brag", these things have burn times way longer than I ever anticipated. At 24 hours on low, I still have one-third of my prior load in the box, and cat in the active range. I could hot load on this, but have refrained, not wanting the coals to really pile up too unmanageable in the firebox. House is plenty warm, so no point in trying to burn faster. Similar situation with the other stove, running 12-hour cycles.

I'm figuring I can get roughly 40 hours on low, 20 hours on medium, running all oak and ash. These burn rates keep the house 71 - 74F, which is actually warmer than I need, but I'm not complaining. So, what to do?

For now, I'm settling for running stoves on high a few nights, burning down the coals before reloading later in the evening, but I think I'm going to just have to settle for a lot of "hot loading" during the week. Saturday will be for burning down the coals, I guess. Not a bad problem to have, but interested in how others are doing with these crazy long burn times. The Jotuls were always down to embers before I was ready to reload, at their respective burn rates.
 
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