Another wood ID...Elm? Mulberry?

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Dfw245

Member
Jan 28, 2022
237
Dallas
Spotted some wood in a FB post nearby. Wanted to grab it, but im not sure what type of wood it is. Looks fairly straight grain, as that matters more to me since i split all my wood by hand. Otherwise, btus are btus and id take what i can get. In this case though, I have to be pretty picky on what I can, and cant get split by hand. Any ideas? Couldnt get a closeup on the leaves. I may have to message them and ask them to show a leaf or two. In TX. Doesnt really look like anything ive seen before. Maybe except American elm? But the heartwood looks a bit too dark for that.

Another wood ID...Elm? Mulberry?


Another wood ID...Elm? Mulberry?


Another wood ID...Elm? Mulberry?


Another wood ID...Elm? Mulberry?
 
Could be elm by the way that bark peeled off in the 1st pic.
Best thing to do really no matter what it is, is to just go there with your maul and whack a few pieces to see how they split.
 
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Could be elm by the way that bark peeled off in the 1st pic.
Best thing to do really no matter what it is, is to just go there with your maul and whack a few pieces to see how they split.
thats the exact same pic i looked at that made me think it was elm. Its quite a long drive away. maybe about 2.5hrs? so if it wasnt worth it? i wasnt gonna go lol
 
Looks like an exotic.
I'll put out Toon tree (Toona sinensis) as a suggestion.
Not elm. It looks like it has compound leaf.
Bark not righter honeylocust.
It has some fast growth (growth rings).
 
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Yeah not locust.
2.5 hrs is a long way to go for firewood.
 
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"2.5 hrs is a long way to go for firewood."

It sure is. Let's say that is 160 miles. In my pickup it costs about 60 cents per mile to drive, counting fuel, wear on tires, oil changes etc. The round trip would be pushing $200 in travel costs.
 
Looks like it could be mulberry to me. Fresh split a round and if it's bright yellow and turns brown in a few days as it dries it is very likely mulberry.
 
Check out bottom pic in post #1 - leaves are compound. Mulberry leaves are simple.
 
"2.5 hrs is a long way to go for firewood."

It sure is. Let's say that is 160 miles. In my pickup it costs about 60 cents per mile to drive, counting fuel, wear on tires, oil changes etc. The round trip would be pushing $200 in travel costs.
its not that bad of a haul if im using my sedan, and also the wood being free which can then be processed and sold when the time comes. plus you dont really count the wear on tires and oil changes when just making one small trip unless thatll put me over to the point i need to get it. Otherwise, those are maintenance items that will be purchased no matter what at the designated intervals. My point is, 2.5hrs(more like 2hrs) would be quite a drive for "crappy" wood. If its something decent, burns hotter than hackberry for example and is harder to find? Id make the trip. I made a 3hr drive one-way for two car loads worth of Cherry rounds before. Some wood is worth it. A lot, isnt.

However, the more I look at this post, the more the wood just doesnt seem worth it. I was originally intrigued that it could potentially be something new or uncommon, but theres a chance its some type of ornamental or crappy wood. Not sure im willing to risk it anymore
 
Wear on tires, and oil changes do indeed count. I'm changing oil at every 5,000 miles, 320 miles added in on a firewood hunt count, just as any other driving would.
The farthest I will drive for firewood is 30 miles but, to each his own. You never know what you're getting on a craigslist score, sometimes guys will exaggerate, or even lie, hoping to find a sucker to clean up trash wood in their yard.
 
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Wear on tires, and oil changes do indeed count. I'm changing oil at every 5,000 miles, 320 miles added in on a firewood hunt count, just as any other driving would.
The farthest I will drive for firewood is 30 miles but, to each his own. You never know what you're getting on a craigslist score, sometimes guys will exaggerate, or even lie, hoping to find a sucker to clean up trash wood in their yard.
Yes, that is indeed correct and just proves the point I made. It's the same as any other driving. And since I always drive my car then it doesn't really add anything to the pile. It's just essentially more miles that would've been racked up anyway. No extra importance on it at all. Also, 320miles on tires is a drop in the bucket.

And yes again, correct. Craigslist guys will exaggerate a lot. (This is FB marketplace tho) Which is why I figure it out before I drive out there mostly. I'll drive for cherry because it rarely exists down here and THAT isn't firewood, that's smoking wood. Cherry fetches a pretty penny down here. I'll either figure it out on my own or post on here to see if it's even worth the drive. I understand the 30miles thing especially if it's all widely available near you. Or if your vehicle swallows gas, I get it. But for something of value? For me? The gas used in the round trip is easily recouped in profits/value
 
I think that the amount of firewood available, its cost, and its usage by the OP are different than for most.of us here - and that leads to different weighing of decisions.

I remember being puzzled initially by some questions, and I only later understood that the OP was looking form wood to smoke with (then).
 
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Your logic is lacking somehow, but, if you want to drive 160 miles to pick up firewood, then I would not think of standing in your way.
Logic is lacking? Not sure how that's plausible. But hey, then again I also don't have any issues with hard work and manual labor. Where as most use a log splitter, I use my own axe. Not for cost savings, but for the pure hard work of it. The cost savings/profit is just a bonus on top of that. I love splitting wood and I believe it's therapeutic. But if it also happens to be a wood that's in demand or even highly regarded/useful, why not drive 160miles for it? Especially if my car easily hits 30+MPG. I'm not saying 2.5hrs isn't a drive. Of course it is, but for someone who loves driving for one, and for two is getting quality wood for absolutely free? You mean to tell me the trip isn't worth it? Truthfully speaking though, as on paper none of any of this matters. The real thing is, if putting 320 miles on tires has you factoring in maintenance costs for a one-off trip? Maybe the tires aren't in tip top shape. Maintenance is maintenance. Doesn't matter if it's in a month or 3 weeks. It still needs to be had. And as long as you stay on top of it and don't cheap out on tires, you can easily get plenty miles out of them where 320 is considered a drop in the bucket. I'm a mechanic so....there's that. I digress. To see a flaw in my logic might indicate a flaw in your understanding. Especially if everything I said makes sense. Whether it's grocery store trips, to see family, vacation, or firewood, mileage is mileage and it all adds up regardless of what it's used for. 320 miles to get firewood is not something I would consider precious, unless you lease your vehicle or have horrendous gas mileage.
 
I think that the amount of firewood available, its cost, and its usage by the OP are different than for most.of us here - and that leads to different weighing of decisions.

I remember being puzzled initially by some questions, and I only later understood that the OP was looking form wood to smoke with (then).
Precisely. I didn't think it was that complex of a concept to grasp but hey, never know. I understand most use it for heating but being in TX? North Texas at that..heating with firewood is more of a luxury/ambiance setting not a required one. 95% of the wood here, is Oak, Pecan, and Hackberry. So when the occasional Cherry, or Apple, or Osage, or Locust pops up? You better believe I'm trekking to go get it. It's too hard a find down here. Would I travel 2.5hrs for oak? Of course not. It's too prevalent. So even if my use case is Smoking or Heating or Campfire, I guess what I'm really trying to say is that it's more the scarcity that leads me to driving long distances for firewood in addition to the usage bonus. You are correct, different usages for different people. I aim to educate and teach my customers the different types of wood and their properties. I also look to revise my quality every year. If my mixed hardwood includes hackberry but I somehow stumble on a bunch of locust trees? I'd incorporate that and educate the customer on how and why it's better than hackberry. It's just little things like that. It doesn't matter if they care or not, I do. I care for my customers quality of happiness. And would love to see them all as repeat customers. The only way to ensure that is a quality product and educating the customers. Ya know, aside from the usual respect and integrity stuff. The firewood business is so muddled down here and I aim to right the ship. If I made a habit out of driving 2-3hrs one way for a couple logs of wood, that wouldn't prove to be a very profitable business so it's obvious that's not the case. But to do it maybe 3 times a year or so? I'd say it's worth every mile and second spent. It gives me the experience of working with a new quality wood as well as learning it's burning properties, smell, weight, hand feel, splitting ease, whether it attracts pests or not, how quick it dries. Etc etc. Sorry about the rant 😂 and I'm not dumping all of this on you as if you didn't understand. You did. And thank you for that. Yeah I remember our initial conversations about the wood for smoking. I'm the type that likes to learn about the wood burning properties and then equate that to how well it would work for other use cases. Learn the wood and everything else becomes clear. So Instead of going to a smoking forum, here is the best place to learn all sorts of wood related things. I just wish some people didn't see different as less than or odd, when in fact it's just....different.
 
I can find a better use of my time.
Providing you factor in all your expenses (which should include time or your personal hourly rate) and the projected profits from selling will earn you a decent profit margin I say go for it. Knowing the margins on firewood are relatively low, I find it hard to believe that if you factor all of this in that you would see any true profit.
 
I can find a better use of my time.
Providing you factor in all your expenses (which should include time or your personal hourly rate) and the projected profits from selling will earn you a decent profit margin I say go for it. Knowing the margins on firewood are relatively low, I find it hard to believe that if you factor all of this in that you would see any true profit.
Well, that's fair. But personally for me? There's not much else to do with my time than what? Splitting wood I have already maybe? I ain't got much else to do, might as well increase my stock. And maybe that's the difference right there. I don't factor in Time nor personal hourly rate. I enjoy what I do. The time isn't a big deal unless I don't feel like doing it at the moment. Otherwise, the only thing truly spent is gas as that's the only thing I'll have to recoup. And I've always heard margins on firewood are relatively low, yet I made $20k in 2.5months. and since the only true expense I have is gas/oil changes/time? That's one helluva profit. Im the only employee and I don't own any equipment just yet so there's nothing to invest in. Except my vehicle maintenance of course. It also helps that I've undercut most of the sellers in my city and I only sell for a few months out of the year. During the spring and summer? It's about gathering wood and letting it season. It's a win-win all around for me. But hey, I don't expect everyone to understand it. I just know personally, I've had nothing but success and profit in it.
 
Logic is lacking? Not sure how that's plausible. But hey, then again I also don't have any issues with hard work and manual labor. Where as most use a log splitter, I use my own axe.
Thats nothin', I use a 1920s hand saw and split my wood by smashing it with a boulder.
 
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