Another wood ID

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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
8,391
Long Island NY
For a friend.
Wood was white,.stays white. Bark quite ridged. Very twisty grain (no sweetgum as no spiky seed pods found anywhere).

Split horribly. Looks up close a bit like maple (satin sheen). I think it is drying fast, given how it felt being in his shed for only two months.

Bark looks corky where cut, and has a different underlayer. No sapwood to be seen.... Very uniform.

Leaves may be like the one there, but that could also have come from the hickory tree nearby?

Any idea?

Another wood ID


Another wood ID


Another wood ID


Another wood ID


Another wood ID
 
The "twisty grain" throws me, but otherwise, it looks like cottonwood, to me.
 
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The twisty grain might just be the way it grew. Can happen to any tree, but I don't know if it could be an indication for some species.
 
I thought that cottonwood would have some greenish or yellowish darker heartwood, or is it completely uniform in color?
 
Cottonwood
 
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The leave on the split has zero undulations at its edge. Not sure it's from this tree tho....

It's not any white oak I have seen; it seems to dry quick, and splits horrible - the opposite of white oak here (that I have seen).
 
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ok but if it were cottonwood, towards the tip, the branches, it should have a much less marked and lighter bark, here it seems all homogeneous, but I could be wrong
 
There was no wood I saw from thinner parts. Just the trunk.
2 ft dia or so.

Thanks for the insight though!
 
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My first thought was cottonwood and that was before I read any of the comments. Cottonwood is very, very heavy when first cut and then very, very light when it dries out. If it was on my place I might burn it but I wouldn't drive two miles out of my way for free cottonwood. I'd take sycamore any day over cottonwood.
 
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The twisty grain might just be the way it grew. Can happen to any tree, but I don't know if it could be an indication for some species.
It occurred to me that this tree could have grown in someone's yard. All the cottonwood I cut grows in my timber. So it is straight and tall -- and straight-grained.

I thought that cottonwood would have some greenish or yellowish darker heartwood, or is it completely uniform in color?
My experience, for what it is worth, is that the wood is very white, throughout.
 
It occurred to me that this tree could have grown in someone's yard. All the cottonwood I cut grows in my timber. So it is straight and tall -- and straight-grained.
Indeed it did. Forested yard, but yard nonetheless. Boundary (edge) tree too.
My experience, for what it is worth, is that the wood is very white, throughout.
Your experience is more than mine for cottonwood for sure, so thanks!

I think this nails the case.
Thanks for all the help to all above.