Blackening a stove like a cast iron skillet?

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777funk

Member
Sep 12, 2014
123
MO
Is this possible? When you first purchase a skillet, the usual method of seasoning is heat it up, add oil, let it smoke and continue. This makes a nice durable non stick coating and prevents rust. Can the same thing be achieved with a wood stove?

If so would it last better than high temp spray paint (just purchased engine paint rated at 650F) but like the cast iron seasoning method better if it's practical on something big like a stove. I've got plenty of used (black) diesel motor oil and the stove is outdoors.
 

pen

There are some who call me...mod.
Staff member
Aug 2, 2007
7,950
N.E. Penna
This works better on different surfaces. Also, it has a temp limit just like paint does, it's not infallible.

In the end, cast takes to "seasoning" better than plate steel will.

What makes this tough is a stove that's outdoors is going to take a beating. I'd suggest cleaning the snot out of the sucker, and a brush on high temp paint instead of a spray on. Even when trying various brands, I have consistently made out better with the brush on high temp paint when compared to the spray on. But, no matter what you use, metal, high heat, and moisture that is found outdoors is a tough combo.
 
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BrotherBart

Modestorator
Staff member
In the first place, stove paint is 1,200 degree not 600. But if this isn't a nice stove and you don't ever plan on bringing it indoors, go for it. And let us know what happens.
 
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Grisu

Minister of Fire
Nov 1, 2010
4,121
Chittenden, VT
If so would it last better than high temp spray paint (just purchased engine paint rated at 650F) but like the cast iron seasoning method better if it's practical on something big like a stove. I've got plenty of used (black) diesel motor oil and the stove is outdoors.
I would say durable is relative. The cast iron skillets I know need occasional re-seasoning although they don't get heated to 600+ F daily for hours at a time. My insert also runs usually at 700 F, the paint you bought would not last long. Used motor oil contains heavy metals, PCBs and other nasty stuff. Not something I would want myself to be exposed to. Why not do it right with proper high-temp stove paint the first time and be all done for years to come?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
81,307
South Puget Sound, WA
Is this possible? When you first purchase a skillet, the usual method of seasoning is heat it up, add oil, let it smoke and continue. This makes a nice durable non stick coating and prevents rust. Can the same thing be achieved with a wood stove?

If so would it last better than high temp spray paint (just purchased engine paint rated at 650F) but like the cast iron seasoning method better if it's practical on something big like a stove. I've got plenty of used (black) diesel motor oil and the stove is outdoors.
650F rating is not good for a wood stove. Our stove sees that temp daily in the winter. You want an actual stove paint rated at around 1200F. The most common one is by Forest Products sold under the Stove Brite label. There are also paints by Krylon and Rustoleum that are designed for BBQs and stoves.
 

777funk

Member
Sep 12, 2014
123
MO
This works better on different surfaces. Also, it has a temp limit just like paint does, it's not infallible.

In the end, cast takes to "seasoning" better than plate steel will.

What makes this tough is a stove that's outdoors is going to take a beating. I'd suggest cleaning the snot out of the sucker, and a brush on high temp paint instead of a spray on. Even when trying various brands, I have consistently made out better with the brush on high temp paint when compared to the spray on. But, no matter what you use, metal, high heat, and moisture that is found outdoors is a tough combo.
It's actually been indoors (stored in a nice garage) but I was saying it'd be outdoors while being treated over the next few days. I prefer to burn off any smells outside. The stove is still in the van right now.

Thanks for the suggestions guys. So what about the stove black products that claim to be more of a polish that's applied seasonally?
https://www.lehmans.com/p-2830-stove-black-and-polish.aspx?show=all

I may take off the previous owner's high temp touchups and use this stuff.
 
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mellow

Resident Stove Connoisseur
Jan 19, 2008
5,054
Salisbury, MD
I have used the stove polish in the past with marginal results, it fades too quickly for my taste and if you touch the stove that stuff comes off on you. I ended up stripping the stove with TSP and painting it with Rustoleum roll on high temp paint, Stove Bright makes some good paint as well in a spray can.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
81,307
South Puget Sound, WA
I had the same results with stove polish. It faded by midseason. Since using paint I never went back. A good stove paint bakes hard and it quite durable. Just don't abuse it by running the stove into overfire temps or it will turn chalky white.
 

777funk

Member
Sep 12, 2014
123
MO
Just finished wire wheeling and painting this thing. Looks a lot better. I used Rust Oleum High Temp 1200F Barbque/Wood Stove paint and it came out a little bit stripey. I don't recommend that stuff. I spray for a living (with a gun) and never would have had something like this with a good nozzle and spray pattern from a spray gun. The narrow 2" fan makes it near impossible to avoid the stripes even with 50% overlaps. Don't recommend that stuff.
 

rkshed

Feeling the Heat
Jan 15, 2012
269
NH
What about colored paints? Which brand is most durable and is there a color to avoid?
 

Jerhurt

Member
Jul 2, 2014
67
Vermont
In the first place, stove paint is 1,200 degree not 600. But if this isn't a nice stove and you don't ever plan on bringing it indoors, go for it. And let us know what happens.
There is never any harm of trying anything new like brother Bert had said especially if it's outside and won't stink up the house
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
81,307
South Puget Sound, WA
What about colored paints? Which brand is most durable and is there a color to avoid?
Same brand, Stove Brite, comes in several colors. Avoid whorehouse red or you will never hear the end of it here. ;lol
 
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