Blaze King Ashford Or Hearthstone Manchester

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BKVP

Minister of Fire
By adding the cast shielding on sides and top, you can reduce ceiling and wall clearance requirements. On the back, same thing, just steel rather than cast iron.

Low clearance requirements often are favored to allow getting the stove "into" the corner or "upgainst" the wall and take up less floor space that can be used otherwise.

That is also why contributors here suggest proper sizing, not just to heat a home, but doing so without the stove room being excessively hot.

BKVP
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
16,558
Philadelphia
Soapstone is indeed a better material than iron, with regard higher heat capacity, a trade-off for lower durability. But as bholler already noted, the difference in heat capacity + mass is not enough to make a very substantial real-world difference, against other larger variables between installations and conditions.
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
6,547
07462
That is also why contributors here suggest proper sizing, not just to heat a home, but doing so without the stove room being excessively hot.
Ding, Ding, Ding, - please take it from my experience - I was one of the guys that bought a stove with little knowledge and installed it in my smaller living room with brand new chimney, my thought process at the time was... "so what if it gets warm, I'll just open a window." well... quality of life circled the drain for 2 years then I bit the bullet and took the same stove and re-installed it in the basement so i could watch tv and not sweat to death.
 
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Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
16,558
Philadelphia
Stove too big? I'd have used that as an excuse to put another addition on the house, rather than sticking my favorite appliance in the basement! ;lol
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,715
central pa
I know many here don't like heating from the basement but I honestly think it works fantastically
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,851
South Puget Sound, WA
Having gone from a strongly radiant cast iron stove that was definitely pulse and glide, to a cast iron clad steel stove in the same location, the difference in room and house temperature swing between the two is exceptional. The radiant stove heated up the space faster and it cooled down faster when the fire died down. I agree that this may be in part due to the convective design. Having run our friend's Summit, I can say there is a similar effect, though the Summit is a bit more reactive. Still, that could be perception. Different house, insulation, etc. FWIW, I've been in a few homes with a T6 or T5 installed and they are experiencing a similar effect. These are heavy stoves to start with so there is a lot of mass regardless of cladding.

Note that the Manchester 8362 with the catalyst added is a new design. We have little user reporting on how this stove heats or is maintained over time. Most of the reviews have been for the non-cat version of this stove. The Hearthstone GM80 is similar and may offer more insight. The Ashford has a decade of user history. Most user reports are favorable if the draft is with spec. Another thing to think about with the Manchester is clearance for the side load door. It is primarily an E/W loader. This should be taken into consideration for a corner or fireplace installation due to side door loading. It can be loaded through the front door, but that is not as convenient. That said, it is a great-looking stove and may turn out to be a good fit. If you end up choosing it, please let us know how it works out over the winter.