Cooking thread, anyone?

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,205
Downeast Maine
It has been very mild here in Texas for the past two days but also fairly gray. The temperatures mean that running the wood stove would be a bit too much, but the lack of sun makes us want some warmth. It was therefore just the time to use the oven.

These were the pockets that I cut in half and filled with sliced beef, onions, peppers, and a little leftover sauerkraut cooked in a bit of yogurt for Sunday dinner. Tonight I used my bread maker to mix pizza dough and turned it into breadsticks with my leftover garlic oil from Friday night. We ate them with plain hamburgers and green beans.

View attachment 257553 View attachment 257554
Looks awesome. I want to try bread sticks soon.
 

PaulOinMA

Minister of Fire
Oct 20, 2018
653
MA
SpaceBus … do you have Diane Seed's "The Top One Hundred Pasta Sauces?" I may have some extra copies of it from library book sales. IM me your address, if you want a copy. Lots of good recipes.

Things like ...

Spaghetti al Pomodoro e Arancia
Spaghetti with Tomato and Orange Sauce​

From The Top One Hundred Pasta Sauces by Diane Seed, Ten Speed Press, Berkley, California, November 1996. First published in 1987.

500 g / 1 lb. spaghetti
15 mL / 1 tbsp. olive oil
1 clove garlic
3 sprigs parsley
4 basil leaves, if available
2 400 g / 14 oz. cans Italian plum tomatoes
Salt
Juice of 1 orange

Heat the oil and add the slightly crushed garlic and whole herbs. Stir and add the tomatoes with their juice, crushing them with a fork in the pan. Add salt to taste and cook rapidly for 10 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add the orange juice to the pan and cook for another 3 minutes. Remove the garlic and herbs and blend or process the sauce. Keep warm.

Cook the pasta in boiled salted water carefully following the directions on the packet to avoid overcooking. Drain the pasta, toss with the sauce, and serve.

Cheese is not served with this recipe.

AND

Tagliatelle alla Papalina

From The Top One Hundred Pasta Sauces by Diane Seed, Ten Speed Press, Berkley, California, November 1996. First published in 1987.

The Rome trattoria “La Cisterna” made this sauce for Cardinal Pacelli who used to be a frequent patron. When he became Pope this sauce was dedicated to him and named Papalina.

500 g / 1 lb. tagliatelle
200 g / 7 oz. ham
1 small onion
150 g / 5 oz. (10 Tbsp.) butter
4 eggs
200 mL / 7 fl. oz. cream
100 g / 4 oz. (1 ¼ cups) freshly grated Parmesan cheese
Salt and black pepper

Cut the ham into fine strips and chop the onion very finely. Melt half the butter and gently cook the onion until it becomes transparent. Add the ham and cook gently for 5 minutes. Keep hot.

Beat the eggs together with the cream and half the cheese.

Cook the pasta, following package directions carefully to avoid over-cooking.

Meanwhile, melt the remaining butter in a large pan and add the egg mixture. Remove from heat at once. Add salt to taste.

Drain the pasta and turn into the large pan containing the egg mixture. Stir well.

Now add the hot ham and onion mixture and keep stirring until the hot pasta and ham have caused the eggs to coagulate and form a thick yellow cream.

Turn into a heated serving bowl, add black pepper to taste, and serve at once.

The remaining grated cheese should be served separately.
 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,205
Downeast Maine
The recipes in this thread are very awesome.
 

firefighterjake

Minister of Fire
Jul 22, 2008
19,079
Unity/Bangor, Maine
How about some needhams . . . tastes pretty similar to a Mounds bar or Almond Joy (minus the almonds) only it uses mashed potato for the filling which sounds disgusting, but when mixed with sugar and coconut tastes great.
 

DuaeGuttae

Minister of Fire
Oct 26, 2016
580
Texas
@firefighterjake, it seems that you stunned us all into silence with your reference to mashed potatoes in candy. Actually it sounded kind of up my ally since I’ve been known to use rutabaga in birthday cake.

The last couple of days in Texas have been warm enough that I haven’t wanted to use the oven much. I did cook some bread in the breadmaker and bacon in the oven for lunch. We had BLTs (with no T), but the lettuce was some trimmings from the plants growing on our deck. As I was making the mayonnaise, it occurred to me that some of you might appreciate the recipe.

10 oz of sunflower oil
1 egg
2 TBSP lime juice (lemon is good as well flavor-wise, and I will substitute rice vinegar if I don’t have juice)
1 scant teaspoon salt (this makes a fairly salty mayonnaise, but we like it that way for sandwiches, a dip, or cole slaw)

I use a stick blender, and it just mixes right up into a thick spread ready for use.

If I’m feeling adventuresome, I’ll put ground mustard in the mix, or blend up a clove of garlic or a green onion. For the right recipe, curry powder is also a nice addition.
 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,205
Downeast Maine
We made an accidental stromboli the other night when I couldn't get the pizza crust off of the peel (didn't know you had to use corn meal). The crust was from scratch and we used half for the almost failed pizza and the other half for breadsticks the following day. Unfortunately, I don't know the recipe and my wife can't find the website we used.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,645
South Puget Sound, WA
@firefighterjake, it seems that you stunned us all into silence with your reference to mashed potatoes in candy. Actually it sounded kind of up my ally since I’ve been known to use rutabaga in birthday cake.

The last couple of days in Texas have been warm enough that I haven’t wanted to use the oven much. I did cook some bread in the breadmaker and bacon in the oven for lunch. We had BLTs (with no T), but the lettuce was some trimmings from the plants growing on our deck. As I was making the mayonnaise, it occurred to me that some of you might appreciate the recipe.

10 oz of sunflower oil
1 egg
2 TBSP lime juice (lemon is good as well flavor-wise, and I will substitute rice vinegar if I don’t have juice)
1 scant teaspoon salt (this makes a fairly salty mayonnaise, but we like it that way for sandwiches, a dip, or cole slaw)

I use a stick blender, and it just mixes right up into a thick spread ready for use.

If I’m feeling adventuresome, I’ll put ground mustard in the mix, or blend up a clove of garlic or a green onion. For the right recipe, curry powder is also a nice addition.
We always have some mustard in the mayo, about a tablespoon. Been making it that way since the early 70s. It adds flavor and helps keep the mayonnaise stable.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,205
Downeast Maine
We always have some mustard in the mayo, about a tablespoon. Been making it that way since the early 70s. It adds flavor and helps keep the mayonnaise stable.
Thanks for the tip. We tried to make mayo at home but it didn't turn out.
 

PaulOinMA

Minister of Fire
Oct 20, 2018
653
MA
Nan and I just went for a walk. She was trying to remember a cake, and I thought of the following. Made this in 2011. Very easy.

Tennessee Apple Upside-Down Cake

The Southern Heritage Cakes Cookbook.
Oxmoore House, Birmingham, AL, 1983.

1 ½ tablespoons butter or margarine
½ cup firmly packed brown sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
3 medium cooking apples, peeled, cored, and cut into rings
¼ cup shortening
¼ cup firmly packed brown sugar
½ cup molasses
1 egg
1 ¼ cups all purpose flour
¾ teaspoon baking soda
¼ teaspoon salt
¾ teaspoon ground ginger
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ cup buttermilk
Whipped cream (optional)

Melt butter in a 9-inch cast iron skillet. Combine ½ cup brown sugar and 1 teaspoon cinnamon; sprinkle over butter in skillet. Arrange apple slices on sugar mixture. Set aside.

Combine shortening, ¼ cup brown sugar, and molasses, creaming well. Add egg; beat well. Combine flour, soda, salt, and spices; add to creamed mixture alternately with buttermilk, beginning and ending with the flour mixture.

Pour batter evenly over apple slices in prepared skillet. Bake at 350° for 50 minutes or until cake tests done. Cool 15 minutes and invert onto plate. Serve warm with whipped cream, if desired. Yield: one 9-inch cake.

Pictures: 12/19/2011: Tennessee Apple Upside-Down Cake: http://www.food.com/bb/viewtopic.zsp?t=367025&start=60 and the following page.
 

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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,645
South Puget Sound, WA
Nan and I just went for a walk. She was trying to remember a cake, and I thought of the following. Made this in 2011. Very easy.

Tennessee Apple Upside-Down Cake
Sounds great. I'd like that with a little bourbon drizzled on top, true Tennessee style. Or maybe marinate the apple slices in bourbon?
 

PaulOinMA

Minister of Fire
Oct 20, 2018
653
MA
I also thought of the following when Nan and I were out for a walk yesterday. Apple and Maple Ricotta Tart. From April 2012. Never made anything like that before. Looks great, if you are having guests. Easy, too.

The recipe was in Edible Boston a freebie magazine that was at the entry of the Verrill Farm store near here ( https://verrillfarm.com/ ) Recipe was on the magazine web site, too, though I haven't checked in a while.

Apple and Maple Ricotta Tart

From Edible Boston: http://www.ediblecommunities.com/boston/spring-2012/apple-and-maple-ricotta-tart.htm.

We know a magic secret: You don’t need lemon to cure apples and keep them from turning brown in your tart and pie recipes. You can use honey! Yes, it’s true. Just make up a 1:1 mix of honey and water and toss your apples in it to hold them until baking. Works like a charm and tastes great too.

Makes one 9½-inch tart

Tart Crust:


8 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold, cut into 1-inch cubes
½ cup maple sugar
1½ cups Four Star Farms bolted pastry flour
1/8 teaspoon salt

Apple Maple Ricotta Filling


4 large apples, peeled, quartered, and sliced into 16ths
(Honeycrisp, Jonagold, Granny Smith)
¼ cup honey
¼ cup water, cold
1 pound whole milk ricotta, Capone’s
½ cup mascarpone
1/3 cup maple syrup
3 large eggs
½ teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon maple sugar

Glaze


3 tablespoons maple syrup, warmed in saucepan

MAKE CRUST


Preheat oven to 350º.

In an electric mixer bowl, combine flour, maple sugar and salt. Mix on low until combined.

Add the cold butter cubes, and mix until combined. The dough will be crumbly.

Turn the mixture onto table and knead together until it starts to resemble dough.

Cover in plastic and chill for 1 hour.

Turn dough onto a floured surface and roll into a circle 10½ inches in diameter.
Place dough over fluted tart pan (or pie plate) and gently press into pan. Prick bottom gently with fork.

Chill for at least 1 hour and up to 1 day.

Par-bake for 12–14 minutes.

Cool and set aside.

MAKE FILLING


Preheat oven to 350º.

Combine honey and water and toss the apples in it. This will prevent the apples from turning brown.

Place ricotta, mascarpone, maple syrup, eggs and a pinch of salt in an electric mixer bowl.
With the paddle attachment, combine on low speed for 30 seconds, then on medium speed for 1 minute.

Scrape the filling into the tart shell, smooth the top, combine the cinnamon and maple sugar and dust the top.

Place the apples on the top of the filling, forming a spiral design.

Sprinkle maple sugar over the top of the apples.

Bake 35–40 minutes, or until the filling is firm and slightly puffed.

Brush the tops of the apples with the maple syrup glaze.

Transfer the tart to a rack and cool completely before serving.

STORING


Leftovers can be kept, well covered, in the refrigerator, for up to 3 days. Serve slightly chilled or at room temperature.

Paul’s comments: There is a lot of filling. Make the tart shell so the sides are above the edge of the tart pan. I used a pastry blender to work in the butter and I also needed a few tablespoons of ice water to make the dough. May try half butter and half shortening next time, like a pie crust.

I used braeburn apples, since apples are not in season, and I could not find the recommended apples. The apples made a lot of liquid while baking, which I drained off the finished tart.

I accidentally sprinkled the maple sugar and cinnamon on top of the apples, rather than on top of the filling. That gives a nice color on top due to the cinnamon. May continue to do that.
 

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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,645
South Puget Sound, WA
Thanks for the tip. We tried to make mayo at home but it didn't turn out.
Don't give up. Often it can be rescued. Did you use a blender, food processor or immersion blender?
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,205
Downeast Maine
Don't give up. Often it can be rescued. Did you use a blender, food processor or immersion blender?
This was a few months ago. We have a vitamix. We tried to follow a recipe but I think it's hard to make with a blender.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,645
South Puget Sound, WA
This was a few months ago. We have a vitamix. We tried to follow a recipe but I think it's hard to make with a blender.
Back in the 70s all I had was a Waring blender. It works. You don't want to rush it. The oil is added slowly, in a thin stream.

 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,205
Downeast Maine
Back in the 70s all I had was a Waring blender. It works. You don't want to rush it. The oil is added slowly, in a thin stream.

There's my issue, I just dumped it all in together.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,205
Downeast Maine
Also, in light of this pandemic I have started a sourdough starter. It should be ready in a few more days. Hopefully the local stores can keep flour in stock.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,205
Downeast Maine
It still didn't rise quite as much as I'd like, my second sourdough loaf ever came out well. I made this with a discard from the last day of making the starter. The previous loaf was also discard starter. I'm hoping loaf #4 comes out better. Loaf #2 came out pretty well, pictured, and loaf #3 is in the oven. The outdoor critters will enjoy loaf #1.
 

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DuaeGuttae

Minister of Fire
Oct 26, 2016
580
Texas
Loaf #2 looks pretty good to me. Is it whole grain? How did loaf #3 go?

It can take a new starter a little while to become truly active, and it doesn’t hurt to increase your first proofing time to get more rise. I have learned over the years not to let my second proofing go too long, or I’ll end up collapsing the bread, but that obviously didn’t happen to you. Do you know about slashing the top of the bread with a razor blade to encourage oven spring?

I keep a sourdough starter in my fridge but haven’t been making as much traditional sourdough since I acquired my bread maker last summer. It’s easy and quick to make a loaf in that. Just the other day I made a beautiful brioche with duck eggs from a friend’s mother.

I love a good sourdough, though, and it’s easier on my stomach than commercial yeast-risen bread. I regularly feed my starter and often use the discard for crumpets. They make a great quick breakfast, lunch, or snack for my kids. Often I feed the starter extra just to have more to discard. I know other folks like to use it for pizza dough.

Are you keeping your starter at room temperature or in the refrigerator? A cookbook I own that has a good sourdough section suggests that keeping it in the fridge and refreshing it the morning or night before you bake actually keeps it a little more lively. I keep mine in the refrigerator because I want to be able to leave it alone for a week if I need to.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,645
South Puget Sound, WA
There's my issue, I just dumped it all in together.
OK. That definitely won't work. You need to slowly, patiently stream the oil into the blend.
 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,205
Downeast Maine
Loaf #2 looks pretty good to me. Is it whole grain? How did loaf #3 go?

It can take a new starter a little while to become truly active, and it doesn’t hurt to increase your first proofing time to get more rise. I have learned over the years not to let my second proofing go too long, or I’ll end up collapsing the bread, but that obviously didn’t happen to you. Do you know about slashing the top of the bread with a razor blade to encourage oven spring?

I keep a sourdough starter in my fridge but haven’t been making as much traditional sourdough since I acquired my bread maker last summer. It’s easy and quick to make a loaf in that. Just the other day I made a beautiful brioche with duck eggs from a friend’s mother.

I love a good sourdough, though, and it’s easier on my stomach than commercial yeast-risen bread. I regularly feed my starter and often use the discard for crumpets. They make a great quick breakfast, lunch, or snack for my kids. Often I feed the starter extra just to have more to discard. I know other folks like to use it for pizza dough.

Are you keeping your starter at room temperature or in the refrigerator? A cookbook I own that has a good sourdough section suggests that keeping it in the fridge and refreshing it the morning or night before you bake actually keeps it a little more lively. I keep mine in the refrigerator because I want to be able to leave it alone for a week if I need to.
It is 100% whole grain. My starter is in the fridge after feeding it multiple times a day for a week. I let this batch proof over night on the counter covered and lost a bunch of fluff when I transferred the dough. Lessons learned. This batch was probably a bit wet as well. Loaf #2 & #3 started in the same batch that I let proof over night on the counter. Yesterday morning I separated and proofed again the boulee and the pan loaf. I'm sure I'll get better and definitely will cut the top of the loaf next time. With a bit less water I think the boulee would have stayed tighter and gotten taller, I think I lost some vertical rise because the dough spread out.


Any tips on getting the bread off the pizza stone easily? Perhaps I didn't use enough corn meal.
 

DuaeGuttae

Minister of Fire
Oct 26, 2016
580
Texas
Whole grain sourdough definitely takes the challenge up a notch in my experience, but it can be oh so yummy even if a bit dense.

I made crumpets as stand-in hamburger buns this evening and thought of you while I was feeding my starter. I’ve moved over the years to using a scale to feed it the same number of grams of flour as water. I find it helps my baking to be sure that my starter is more consistent, and I also use the scale with my recipes as well. I found that I was not so good about measuring liquids with my eyes, and that helps me a lot. It’s also nice because I grind my wheat berries, and I can just weigh the proper amount in to the blender jar, grind it and add the batch to the recipe.

I can’t say I remember much difficulty getting bread off my stones, but mine are years and years old and well seasoned. I’m also not afraid to grease them for meals like pizza, but I never wash them with soap, just water and a sponge or a scraper if necessary. I tend not to use stones for my boules, though. I use an enameled cast iron dutch oven, but even that doesn’t happen very often as my kids prefer loaves. They appreciate a good bread, but they haven’t come to love a hearty crust yet.

This is making me want to bake a good sourdough boule. I don’t see it happening this week, though. Afternoon temperatures will be in the eighties, and the kitchen has west-facing windows. I’m already drawing the blinds. My cooking definitely shifts away from roasting and baking in the hot months.
 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
4,205
Downeast Maine
Whole grain sourdough definitely takes the challenge up a notch in my experience, but it can be oh so yummy even if a bit dense.

I made crumpets as stand-in hamburger buns this evening and thought of you while I was feeding my starter. I’ve moved over the years to using a scale to feed it the same number of grams of flour as water. I find it helps my baking to be sure that my starter is more consistent, and I also use the scale with my recipes as well. I found that I was not so good about measuring liquids with my eyes, and that helps me a lot. It’s also nice because I grind my wheat berries, and I can just weigh the proper amount in to the blender jar, grind it and add the batch to the recipe.

I can’t say I remember much difficulty getting bread off my stones, but mine are years and years old and well seasoned. I’m also not afraid to grease them for meals like pizza, but I never wash them with soap, just water and a sponge or a scraper if necessary. I tend not to use stones for my boules, though. I use an enameled cast iron dutch oven, but even that doesn’t happen very often as my kids prefer loaves. They appreciate a good bread, but they haven’t come to love a hearty crust yet.

This is making me want to bake a good sourdough boule. I don’t see it happening this week, though. Afternoon temperatures will be in the eighties, and the kitchen has west-facing windows. I’m already drawing the blinds. My cooking definitely shifts away from roasting and baking in the hot months.
My pan loafs come out too sour, but I think it's because I proof them in the warming drawer of my cookstove in an attempt to make them rise higher. My pizza stone has only been used a few times, and no Dutch oven, yet. My wife and I started our lives over a few years ago with almost nothing, so our cookware is disappointing at the moment. I have had some good success with brioche Buns for some reason, even when using whole wheat and starter. I'm hoping to get a grain mill in the next few weeks, maybe even a grain flaker.


This is the mill I have my eye on :http://www.bearsinthewoods.net/shop/me1112.html

A local store has an all metal grain mill, but I have mixed feelings about tin plated iron or stell grinders. My coffee grinder is hand powered with ceramic burs.

I have only recently discovered the joys of cooking with a scale. Now I use it all the time. Today is feeding day for my starter, so I'll try another loaf.
 

PaulOinMA

Minister of Fire
Oct 20, 2018
653
MA
Sylvia's of Harlem Mac and Cheese recipe for dinner last night. Leftovers tonight and tomorrow. Made one-and-a-half times the recipe, 18-oz. casserole-ize elbow macaroni. Cheese is white cheddar and muenster. Recipe available online. Yum!
 

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DuaeGuttae

Minister of Fire
Oct 26, 2016
580
Texas
My pan loafs come out too sour, but I think it's because I proof them in the warming drawer of my cookstove in an attempt to make them rise higher. My pizza stone has only been used a few times, and no Dutch oven, yet. My wife and I started our lives over a few years ago with almost nothing, so our cookware is disappointing at the moment. I have had some good success with brioche Buns for some reason, even when using whole wheat and starter. I'm hoping to get a grain mill in the next few weeks, maybe even a grain flaker.


This is the mill I have my eye on :http://www.bearsinthewoods.net/shop/me1112.html

A local store has an all metal grain mill, but I have mixed feelings about tin plated iron or stell grinders. My coffee grinder is hand powered with ceramic burs.

I have only recently discovered the joys of cooking with a scale. Now I use it all the time. Today is feeding day for my starter, so I'll try another loaf.
I’m no grain mill expert. I don’t own one. Years ago we bought an old Vitamix off eBay with a dry container, and that’s what I use for making my flour.

My son requested more brioche today, so I need to go get that in the bread maker. We have a large supply of duck eggs at the moment, and they are wonderful for baking.
 
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