Electric Splitter

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,325
Northern Canada
That's how we try to do it now too. It's just as fast as a processor.
The least amount of times you handle a piece of wood the better off you are for getting a return on your investment.Investment being your time...
 
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cheapheatnow

Member
Nov 26, 2009
24
WMASS
My SuperSplit also is waist level, horizontal only. I thought it would be the one major disadvantage over conventional splitters that can go vertical. Since I normally process my rounds from a pile next to a paved area, I solved the issue with a hydraulic rolling cart. I can load it up with a few hundred pounds, roll it to the splitter then raise it to splitter hight. Let’s me do a load of rounds in a batch.
Hey thanks....under consideration for sure!
 

Max W

New Member
Feb 4, 2021
13
Maine
I like that the electric splitter is so much quieter. When I built it, some years ago, I had on hand a one horse, 220V C faced motor that matched up to the pump adapter I was able to find. I figured I would have to go with a larger motor but it has worked to split virtually everything I cut. I even managed to bend the 5/8th inch plate that the wood is driven into and had to add channel iron pieces as back up. I did build it to take only an18 inch piece max and usually cut a little less than 16 inches for the Waterford Stanley. I burn hardwood, maple, beech, yellow birch etc. It does slow on a large piece, occasionally almost to a stop but seldom gets stuck. If that happens I just back it intoa block of wood set against a frame. If I were doing many cords in a day with a work party I might want something faster but this has worked for me.

It’s stable, mounted on an old boat trailer and its a little below waist height. I set up a table on saw horses beside me, load up the table and can let the split wood drop into my wheelbarrow to stack if I want to cut out handling it an extra time. I have a 60 ft 10 ga cord that plugs into a dryer outlet and a shorter section of 10/3 wire for a some more length. The motor will get warm but it has last stood up well the way I have use it over the dozen years when wood we were using around six cords at our previous house. I bet it would be a real workhorse with a 3 hp. on it. I only use it occasionally now as I am buying my wood split.

When that old gas engine is on its last legs converting to electric may be an option to look at.

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Max W

New Member
Feb 4, 2021
13
Maine
The pump is a Northern tool 1012 at 11 gal / min. If it were higher I would need a larger motor.

https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200321051_200321051 This looks to be the same one and is listed and is rated at 2500 psi. in stage 2 with a max of 3000# . It requires 3600 rpm which is what my motor does turn at.

The cylinder is 4” with a 1 1/2” shaft and also was from Northern Tool. The aluminum coupling adapter allows one to align an join the shafts. It is made to fit a C face motor and the pump. I don’t recall the dealer, just that I had to travel down to some industrial park in Portland to get it. Today there are many more online options.

I don’t know the cycling time. I could use a little wood sized in between kindling and larger stuff. If I get to respltting some I’ll time the cycle. It was pretty cold this AM. I don’t know how thick the oil might be. See if it warms up some. Edit: With just an 18 in throw compared to a 24 inch, the cycle time is shorter, other things being equal.

ps: I’m still figuring things out here. I got nothing against pink and purple. Lovely in my wife’s flower garden but is there a way to get some other color for my initial?

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Max W

New Member
Feb 4, 2021
13
Maine
That’s a good question. No expert, I’ve been curious and doing a little reading. Pressure relates to power. 2500 psi is pretty much a standard for splitter pumps what ever the gpm. Gpm relates to speed. Other things being equal in each case such as ports, cylinder, piston etc. I wish I could measure the pressure. I was very surprised that the motor does it job so well. It is one large very heavy industrial type dual voltage motor wired to run at 220V but still only rated at 1hp.. I believe it came off a hay conveyer and was just setting in my shed. I’d like to be able to show you a video but would have to figure out some things. Not very tech savvy.
 

Max W

New Member
Feb 4, 2021
13
Maine
I can look in a bit. I guess it wasn’t from a hay conveyer. It has a fan and not sealed.
 

Max W

New Member
Feb 4, 2021
13
Maine
You had good reason to be surprised that it is only 1hp. It is a 2 hp! All this time.... Glad you kept asking.
I aplogize for the wrong information.
I couldn’t get my head to see the plate but the ipad fit in nicely.

The thumbnail pic should be clear expanded.

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Isaac Carlson

Minister of Fire
Nov 19, 2012
502
NW Wisconsin
Glad to hear it's a 2 hp. I'm curious what your pressures are for kick down and bypass. Mine is around 700 psi and 3400 psi. Going to drop the top end down to 3000. I can hear the motor work a bit at the kick down point. The high pressure sode of my pump is only 1.8 gpm, so hp is no problem there. Most 11gpm pumps are ~3.4 gpm on the high pressure side, so hp limits the bypass pressure.