First EVER Wood-Burning Stove Just Installed!

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Trooper

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Been lurking and posting on Hearth.com for a while now and am so grateful for all of the spot-on information that exists here.

Wanted to let everyone know that I just purchased and had installed a Napoleon 1402 insert. Of course, it was installed on one of the warmest days of the year so far so there will be no burning until the fall :(.

Am told that I should light about 2 or 3 fires before it gets cold, so that I can burn with the windows and doors open. I believe this is to burn off the paint on the inside of the stove???

Again, thanks for all of the great info here...

Can't wait to start burning!

Dan
Insert2.jpg
 
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Sprinter

Minister of Fire
Jul 1, 2012
2,984
SW Washington
Been lurking and posting on Hearth.com for a while now and am so grateful for all of the spot-on information that exists here.

Wanted to let everyone know that I just purchased and had installed a Napoleon 1402 insert. Of course, it was installed on one of the warmest days of the year so far so there will be no burning until the fall :(.

Am told that I should light about 2 or 3 fires before it gets cold, so that I can burn with the windows and doors open. I believe this is to burn off the paint on the inside of the stove???

Again, thanks for all of the great info here...

Can't wait to start burning!

Dan
View attachment 103818
Nice looking installation. The initial burns are to cure the paint on the stove. It needs to get to about 600F or so to properly cure the hi-temp paint. It's very stinky, so you do want to ventilate well, preferably with fans. It helps to do it in stages. You may want to burn a few times anyway just to be sure everything is working to your expectations.

Do you have a good supply of wood that will get to about 20% moisture content for the season?

Very attractive.
 
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Trooper

Guest
Do you have a good supply of wood that will get to about 20% moisture content for the season?

Very attractive.
Thanks Sprinter. I definitely have a season's worth of dry wood, as I have been burning in the fireplace till now. How much beyond a season is still TBD, since I am not sure how much I will consume. Part of the fun, I guess!
 

bogydave

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2009
8,426
So Cent ALASKA
Am told that I should light about 2 or 3 fires before it gets cold, so that I can burn with the windows and doors open. I believe this is to burn off the paint on the inside of the stove???
Yes, Yes , Yes
Cure the paint on the outside of the stove that smokes up the house , smells horrid & sets off smoke detectors.

Should have some first fire instructions. Follow them.
Burn a good hot fire before winter too, the hotter it gets, the more odors & smoke comes off before the house is closed up for winter. ;)

I installed mine new in the winter, a memorable day <>

Try to get ahead on the firewood supply so it's ready (dry) for next & next burn season.

Nice install :)
 
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Ram 1500 with an axe...

Minister of Fire
Mar 26, 2013
2,327
New Jersey
My insert break in fires had nothing to do with curing the paint....it was all about curing the brick walls so that they will be able to take long and hot burns. My surround doesn't get hot, just the glass...
Follow directions in the book, good luck with it, it looks great...
 
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KaptJaq

Minister of Fire
Jan 31, 2011
718
Long Island, NY
Ok peoples-what is an insert?
And I also just had a new woodstove installed, do I also have to burn it super hot to properly cure the high temp paint? :confused:
An insert is a stove designed to fit inside an existing fireplace.

Your new stove's manual should have "break-in" fire information. It is usually three or so fires. First one small, then a medium, then a good sized fire. During these fires the stove paint cures (and smells/smokes a little), the firebrick finishes curing, and all the joints expand and contract settling into their final positions. Too hot of a first fire can do some damage to the unit.

If you have specific questions it is best to start a thread about your install ...

KaptJaq
 

Jags

Moderate Moderator
Staff member
Aug 2, 2006
18,151
Northern IL
Break in fires are usually staged (as others have stated). Small fire - cool down. Med fire - cool down. Big fire - cool down. Most manuals contain some sort of break in instructions. Keep in mind that every "new" high temp will produce some smells for awhile.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
84,163
South Puget Sound, WA
Ok peoples-what is an insert?
And I also just had a new woodstove installed, do I also have to burn it super hot to properly cure the high temp paint? :confused:
A stove top temp over 500::F will bake in the paint sufficiently. That's not super hot. I'd recommend that both you and trooper get a stove top thermometer to better learn how you are burning and not overfire the stove.
 
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Nick Mystic

Minister of Fire
Feb 12, 2013
1,125
Western North Carolina
Congratulations on the new insert Trooper. Your photo of the insert doesn't show what the floor in front of the hearth is made of. From the photo it appears the front of the insert might be less than the 16" required by most manufactures for their inserts. I had a similar set up with my old smoke dragon insert before I installed a new free standing stove on my hearth this past February. If you do have a combustible floor down there you should at least put down an ember protecting rug in front of the stove before you start burning in earnest. Our old insert didn't have a glass window and on occasion a log would be leaning against the doors when I opened them and embers would come tumbling out. My ember protection rug saved my laminate floor from being damaged by the red hot coals. More than likely, you could be required to have even more protection than the ember proof rug, but until you sort things out you should at least get that in place to save yourself some possible damage if you happen to have a wood floor, carpeting, etc.
 
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Trooper

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Congratulations on the new insert Trooper. Your photo of the insert doesn't show what the floor in front of the hearth is made of. From the photo it appears the front of the insert might be less than the 16" required by most manufactures for their inserts. I had a similar set up with my old smoke dragon insert before I installed a new free standing stove on my hearth this past February. If you do have a combustible floor down there you should at least put down an ember protecting rug in front of the stove before you start burning in earnest. Our old insert didn't have a glass window and on occasion a log would be leaning against the doors when I opened them and embers would come tumbling out. My ember protection rug saved my laminate floor from being damaged by the red hot coals. More than likely, you could be required to have even more protection than the ember proof rug, but until you sort things out you should at least get that in place to save yourself some possible damage if you happen to have a wood floor, carpeting, etc.
Thanks Nick. There is a wood laminate floor in front of the hearth, and I have an ember rug there. I don't have the exact depth of the hearth handy, but I know it is at least 16". Granted, the stove protrudes so I may be under the full 16". Is there a high risk of embers/logs falling out of the insert? I am only planning to open the door when cold-starting or placing logs on a bed of coals.
 
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Trooper

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I'd recommend that both you and trooper get a stove top thermometer to better learn how you are burning and not overfire the stove.
I agree, begreen. I will head over to the Gear forum and search for some recommendations on manufacturers and placements on the insert.
 

Backwoods Savage

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2007
27,812
Michigan
Trooper, you can do that right here. Most find the Condar thermometers to be the most accurate but even those can be off perhaps 10-20 degrees but that is close enough. As for placement, that is more difficult on the inserts vs a free standing stove. I'll let others who have inserts chime in on their inserts and thermometer placements.

I'll also agree with others in that break-in fires are usually done with 3 of them. A small one, a medium one and then one that will get the stove to 500 degrees or so. Then you are good to go.

As for how much wood you'll consume, that depends upon your location and we know that Arizona varies a lot with winter temperatures. For example, just compare Flagstaff with Yuma or Phoenix.
 

Sprinter

Minister of Fire
Jul 1, 2012
2,984
SW Washington
A stove top temp over 500::F will bake in the paint sufficiently. That's not super hot. I'd recommend that both you and trooper get a stove top thermometer to better learn how you are burning and not overfire the stove.
Your right. I thought I read somewhere that the resin curing takes place at about 600, but I see that it's more like 475-500.
 
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Trooper

Guest
Trooper, you can do that right here. Most find the Condar thermometers to be the most accurate but even those can be off perhaps 10-20 degrees but that is close enough. As for placement, that is more difficult on the inserts vs a free standing stove. I'll let others who have inserts chime in on their inserts and thermometer placements.
Hi Dennis - I agree that a 10-20 degree variance is immaterial. According to my research Condar offers 2 thermometers for inserts: the Inferno and the Medallion. Any opinions as to which is better?
 

Sprinter

Minister of Fire
Jul 1, 2012
2,984
SW Washington
Hi Dennis - I agree that a 10-20 degree variance is immaterial. According to my research Condar offers 2 thermometers for inserts: the Inferno and the Medallion. Any opinions as to which is better?
They look like they're identical except for styling. I have an Inferno and it's fine. It seems to be the favorite of the members here. The trick is finding a good place to put it on an insert. On a freestanding stove, you just put it on the top.
 
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Sprinter

Minister of Fire
Jul 1, 2012
2,984
SW Washington
Why not just light the fireplace then? Or are we talkin' about putting a wood stove into a gas fireplace.
Basically, an insert provides all the efficiency advantages of a stove, but within the opening of an existing fireplace. Open fireplaces are about the most inefficient and drafty way to burn wood there is.

We'd like to learn more about what you have. It would be best if you could start a new thread so we can properly address any questions you might have.
 

Sprinter

Minister of Fire
Jul 1, 2012
2,984
SW Washington
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Trooper

Guest
They look like they're identical except for styling. I have an Inferno and it's fine. It seems to be the favorite of the members here. The trick is finding a good place to put it on an insert. On a freestanding stove, you just put it on the top.
Thanks Splinter. As far as placement, the manual states to locate the thermometer 14" above the flue collar. That doesn't make sense to me. Does that mean I will need to remove the surround every time I want to read the thermometer?

So I'm tryin' to understand what IS an insert. It can't be effiecient like a regular wood stove cuz it doesn't have exposed stove pipes that toss the heat into the room.
0gopogo, I am no expert but an insert is a cast iron or steel box (essentially) which is internally lined with firebrick and is placed inside the fireplace. The insert is vented up through the existing chimney, which has been lined with stainless steel flex pipe. Heating of the home is achieved by a blower or blowers which push the warm air out; warmth from the insert is also radiated directly from the surface of the insert into the home, similar to a wood stove. Hope that helps.
 

Sprinter

Minister of Fire
Jul 1, 2012
2,984
SW Washington
As far as placement, the manual states to locate the thermometer 14" above the flue collar. That doesn't make sense to me. Does that mean I will need to remove the surround every time I want to read the thermometer?
These thermometers can be used for a single wall pipe as well as stove top. You're probably reading the instructions for that. You're going to need to find the best place to read the temp of the stove itself. It seems to vary with models.
 

Backwoods Savage

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2007
27,812
Michigan
Hi Dennis - I agree that a 10-20 degree variance is immaterial. According to my research Condar offers 2 thermometers for inserts: the Inferno and the Medallion. Any opinions as to which is better?

I don't think there is any difference but can not say for certain. I will say that it is more difficult with an insert vs a free standing stove but you can still get a good general idea of what is happening in the stove and that is the reason for the thermometer. It does not have to be exact but some like it close to exact so they will install a probe. I ran wood stoves for around 50 years without a thermometer and got along just fine. However, now I really like them and would hate to be without.
 
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blacktail

Minister of Fire
Sep 18, 2011
1,416
Western WA
Beautiful insert! I love the look of it in that hearth.
If you have to put a thermometer somewhere other than the top it'll still give you an idea of how your fire is going. Just don't try to match the temps other people get from a stove top reading. My thermometer is on a front corner and anything over a 500 degree reading is really cooking.
 
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Trooper

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Thanks Dennis and blacktail! I kind of equate the thermomoter placement/accuracy to a scale used for weighing one's self. If I am trying to lose or maintain weight, I don't necessarily care what I weigh, I just care about the change in weight over time.

Yes, I probably care that I am not actually burning at 900 when my t'stat says 400. I think I will start by placing it on the 'cooktop' area and see what happens. Any flaws in my thinking?
 
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