First-time stove buyer

Chasm Posted By Chasm, Jul 4, 2018 at 9:58 AM

  1. begreen

    begreen
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    For reference, at 45º night temp I'm only running a partial load in a 3 cu ft stove heating 2000 sq ft. I usually don't fully load until the night temp gets down to around 40F with daytime high around 45º.
     
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  2. Highbeam

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    But 78 during the day! That really is quite a swing.
     
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  3. begreen

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    It's far south. Would be warmer at night, but for the high altitude. We went from cool nights in Oaxaca then west down to the coast at Puerto Angel and the difference was very noticeable. We celebrated New Years there and wined and dined outdoors every night. Even at midnight it was comfortable to be in a short sleeve shirt.
     
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  4. Blazingembers7749

    Blazingembers7749
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    I think the rule your referencing is nfpa 211's 3,2,10 rule. Chimney must extend 3ft out of the roofline and 2ft higher than anything withing 10ft. Not saying there isnt a 3,10 rule this is just the first time ive heard that.
     
  5. Blazingembers7749

    Blazingembers7749
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    I havent read thru the entirety of the post but you might be happier with a pellet stove as u can turn it on and have good heat in a few minutes and turn it off and have zero heat within 15 minutes or so
     
  6. begreen

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    Where would the pellets come from?
     
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  7. Blazingembers7749

    Blazingembers7749
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    I would try sourcing them from somewhere in mexico if at all possible. if its too much of a pia to get pellets then obviously it would not be a good choice. Also needing a consistant source of power may rule out a pellet stove as well. Draft should not be an issue since it will be forced air via a combustion blower. Just seems to fit the heating needs if pellets and electricity are readily avaible.
     
  8. Blazingembers7749

    Blazingembers7749
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    I do agree in this case a 2.0 or smaller firebox should probably be used if using a wood stove to extract heat for say 8 or less hours a day so that the operating temps get high enough to burning cleanly. So much of the initial loads btus is going to be used to heat the system to proper operating temps on a cold stove/system.
     
  9. begreen

    begreen
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    Most houses there work with nature. Another option would be to improve the passive solar aspects of the house. This might simply mean adding some windows on the south and west sides that allow sun to warm up the floors. With a deep soffit or awning or deciduous tree to shade the sun during summer months, this can be an effective way to warm the house. Another common heating option in Mexican houses is a built-in masonry cooking stove. These used to be horrible, smoking up the interior of the home, but there have been modern improvements that make them more efficient and cleaner burning. A rocket stove would also work.
     
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  10. Blazingembers7749

    Blazingembers7749
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    Im not sure adding windows is going to help relieve night time temp drops. Any radiant heat from the added windows would quickly dissappear once the sun went down. Glad they are coming up with healthier alternatives for cooking cause breathing in all that smoke is horrible.
     
  11. begreen

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    Yes, some heat will be lost, but this is not 20º weather outside. Last Nov. we stayed in Columbia at an even higher altitude in a home with no heat other than a fireplace. There was plenty of glass and night time temps in the mid 40's. It was cooler in the morning, but not miserable. With large patio doors the sun did a good job of warming the house. We only had a chill chaser fire one night. The thermal mass of the home made the difference.
     
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  12. begreen

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    Another option would be heating with propane if the goal is quick on and off and thermostatic control.
     
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  13. Blazingembers7749

    Blazingembers7749
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    Jun 26, 2018
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    Still disagree with the window theory for the particular situation unless used in conjunction with a heat source other than solar radiant. Propane on the other hand would be ideal assuming a tank gasline and fuel are not an issue.
     
  14. Chasm

    Chasm
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    Jul 4, 2018
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    Exactly, I'm afraid
     
  15. Chasm

    Chasm
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    It gets hot on the coast. In the valley, inland high plateau, it's cool in the shade, never hot at night, but it can really scorch under the sun
     
  16. Chasm

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    Too much heat lost at night through windows. All solar gain lost rather quickly. If I were building a house I'd use solar and pump hot water under slab. But for what I got, I'm thinking a stove will do me right
     
  17. Blazingembers7749

    Blazingembers7749
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    Kodiak 1200 may be another decent stove that would fit the bill
     
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  18. Chasm

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    Jul 4, 2018
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    Thank you folks. I have a better picture of size and pricing. Mr begreen: Is T19 comparable to T20? If so, I may be close to a purchase.
    Next I'll have to bother you folk some more for info on what type stove pipe to buy and how to install piping/assembly.
     
  19. Blazingembers7749

    Blazingembers7749
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    If the budget allows ive had good luck with ventis but theres plenty of other good options out there. 6" Appliance connector, Double wall connector pipe if budget allows Flat ceiling or cathedral? Flat go with 11" ceiling support box catherdral go with 24" ceiling support box. i would save money and not get truss spanners and frame around the box with 2*4s. You can get trim for the support box if you choose. The ceiling support boxes should come with an adaptor to go from connector pipe to class a chimney pipe. Class a pipe 304 should be sufficient. You want to go from the ceiling support box till the chimney ends with the class a pipe. Ceiling support box should extend into the room with the connector pipe at least 6". If in a attic recomend using attic insulation sheild. Ive only delt with metal and shingled roofs cut your hole run the pipe thru maintaining clearances put your roof flashing on storm collar and rain cap i like to use roof braces as well especislly if the chimney comes out of the roof more than 5 ft or in particularly windy areas. This is the basic version will need more information or pictures to give an actual pipe and parts breakdown as well as step by step instructions.
     
  20. Blazingembers7749

    Blazingembers7749
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    This would be a very basic example.
     

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  21. Chasm

    Chasm
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    Jul 4, 2018
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    Thanks! These are new terms for me. I am presently in NY but will get some photos this week. What are pricing parameters for whole setup - high and low?? Class A pipe 6" or 8"? I saw some SS pipe sold on Craigslist, this one a triple wall: "12' long can be broken down into 4 sections with cap on top. 6" dia".............
     
  22. Chasm

    Chasm
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  23. Chasm

    Chasm
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  24. Chasm

    Chasm
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  25. begreen

    begreen
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    Nov 18, 2005
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    The T19 is the predecessor and a fine value stove.

    To assess the best option for stove pipe and chimney it would help to see some pictures of the proposed stove location and if possible a shot of the ceiling and roof.
     
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