First year with wood insert, not really helping . . . please help!

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2fireplacesinSC

Burning Hunk
Feb 24, 2015
167
mid South Carolina
I’d be leery of driving that far without pictures of the inside. At least open the door and let me see inside.
 
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JMBoriss

New Member
Feb 10, 2019
42
Columbus, Indiana
I'll ask her again to take pictures of the inside, makes total sense.

So here's the other thing preparing for this 10+ round trip drive. I've downloaded the manual and read through it. My hearth comes out 14". The insert's faceplate only allows the insert to go back 16.875" inches. That will leave 6.25" sticking out onto the hearth, with another 4.875 inches for the blower assembly, leaving a little less than 3 inches between the end of the hearth and the blower assembly and 7.75inches between the end of the hearth and door/box. I guess I could always push it back as far as it can go into my fireplace and run it without the surround and/or fabricate an additional "tunnel" to bridge the gap between the blower air exit and surround? Wife would not approve it in place without a surround. She doesn’t prefer the look of roxul over the faceplate. Figures I have a huge fireplace but tiny hearth! My fireplace is 41" wide, 27" deep and 29" tall. Or could I just buy a hearth extender type mat and just put it down in front of the hearth?
 
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ColdNorCal

Feeling the Heat
Mar 6, 2018
253
Nor Cal
I drove 90 mins one way to look at a used Regency insert. The few pics I got it looked good. Well, I did not buy it as the door was warped and the upper piece of metal on the inside for air wash, just above the door, was completely bowed in, almost in a half circle, and broken and separated in the middle. Also, not all the bricks were correct size/height and sit flush with each other or fit correctly. At that point, I did not even bother to investigate the baffle, air tubes, welds... However, the outside pics and the one pic of the inside with the door open looked good.

Also, when I showed the seller what I had found and he realized I was not very interested, he lowered the price to only $400, Started at $600 on cl, lowered to $500 on the phone call prior to seeing it. "For me", it still was not worth the risk, investment in time and parts, or the potential danger it could impose for being over fired and not properly maintained.

Seriously, I hope you have better luck.
 
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Easy Livin’ 3000

Minister of Fire
Dec 23, 2015
2,491
SEPA
Okay so here's the only pictures I could get from the seller. It also comes with the stainless steel pipe. Don't need that but hopefully I can sell that and maybe recoop some of the costs? Anyways, It definitely needs a new paint job and go through, which I would do anyways and probably new firebricks. Seller said it has a date of 10/2009 and they purchased it in 2010 but has been in storage the last two years. I'm going to download the manual and give it a read. Anyways, super excited for next fall/winter. Also pictured in the firewood I've been stocking up so far for next season. Mostly ash, red maple, hackberry and some osage orange. It should be seasoned by next season, hopefully.

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I think you should do the math on this one. Driving 20 hours to pick up that busted up decade old stove is crazy talk!

How much does it cost per mile on your truck? If it's 10 hours each way, let's say 1,000 miles round-trip. Your truck costs at least $.50/mile (way low, but I'm making this simple). So that's at least $500 in transportation costs. Now you are up to $1000. If I'm a little more honest about cost per mile, it's probably at least .$75/mile. Trucks are expensive, and burn a lot of fuel.

Now there's your time. 20 hours on the road. And after a few hours of quality family time, it's just gonna be shitty road time. Plus, moving the stove will take a couple of hours. Then you should probably find someplace to stay, for safety sake. Hotel and meals out add to the cost.

Next, 20 hours on the road poses considerable risk to you, your son, and your father. Plus the risk of something being wrong with the stove when you get there.

So, let's just say that you will save $1,000 on the stove. It's 10 years old and a little busted up. Could fail anytime, and no warranty. Extra risk.

This is heating infrastructure, it's gonna cost something, and what you are thinking about doing really doesn't make sense.

Using all the information I've provided, order the stove online for free delivery, right to your house. Man up and tell your wife that is what's happening.

https://www.woodlanddirect.com/Osburn-2400-Wood-Stove-Insert?st-t=shopping&gclid=CjwKCAiAnsnjBRB6EiwATkM1XjmPid9CtDl0NaNTANCWMDwCZd8iW0LKrmY-q76pq2xb6AKLKQbhphoCdowQAvD_BwE
 

maple1

Minister of Fire
Sep 15, 2011
10,025
Nova Scotia
I think you should do the math on this one. Driving 20 hours to pick up that busted up decade old stove is crazy talk!

How much does it cost per mile on your truck? If it's 10 hours each way, let's say 1,000 miles round-trip. Your truck costs at least $.50/mile (way low, but I'm making this simple). So that's at least $500 in transportation costs. Now you are up to $1000. If I'm a little more honest about cost per mile, it's probably at least .$75/mile. Trucks are expensive, and burn a lot of fuel.

Now there's your time. 20 hours on the road. And after a few hours of quality family time, it's just gonna be shitty road time. Plus, moving the stove will take a couple of hours. Then you should probably find someplace to stay, for safety sake. Hotel and meals out add to the cost.

Next, 20 hours on the road poses considerable risk to you, your son, and your father. Plus the risk of something being wrong with the stove when you get there.

So, let's just say that you will save $1,000 on the stove. It's 10 years old and a little busted up. Could fail anytime, and no warranty. Extra risk.

This is heating infrastructure, it's gonna cost something, and what you are thinking about doing really doesn't make sense.

Using all the information I've provided, order the stove online for free delivery, right to your house. Man up and tell your wife that is what's happening.

https://www.woodlanddirect.com/Osburn-2400-Wood-Stove-Insert?st-t=shopping&gclid=CjwKCAiAnsnjBRB6EiwATkM1XjmPid9CtDl0NaNTANCWMDwCZd8iW0LKrmY-q76pq2xb6AKLKQbhphoCdowQAvD_BwE
10 hours round trip.

Still substantial though.
 

Easy Livin’ 3000

Minister of Fire
Dec 23, 2015
2,491
SEPA
10 hours round trip.

Still substantial though.
Need more coffee this morning.

Thanks for the correction maple.

Even without the previous intentional hyperbole, an extra grand (or $1500) on big heating infrastructure where the fuel can be free, is a small price to pay. It's not like the stove is a toy or without huge utility. I'm certain I've saved at least that much in natural gas cost in three years using the stove.

And I hate to see men getting pushed around by their wives like we see all the time here. If the fire is the man's job, he should get the tools he needs (where reasonable).
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
79,276
South Puget Sound, WA
And I hate to see men getting pushed around by their wives like we see all the time here. If the fire is the man's job, he should get the tools he needs (where reasonable).
Well said until this sentence which is utter nonsense.
 

Easy Livin’ 3000

Minister of Fire
Dec 23, 2015
2,491
SEPA
I think he watching cavemen movies, 10,000 bc perhaps.
I was careful with my words, I said "if" it's his job. Nothing against sharing responsibility, or, better yet, delegating the whole thing, but that's a rarity. Mom was the fire tender in my house growing up, Dad wanted almost nothing to do with it, so Mom got to pick the stove. And as soon as I could yield axe and saw, she had me supplying the fuel, but she did much of the stacking.

I suspected this would get some interesting reaction, but nothing chauvinist intended.
 
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JMBoriss

New Member
Feb 10, 2019
42
Columbus, Indiana
Well, I did man up and tell her I was driving 10 hours round trip to get it, which she still disagrees with. It's my decision not to spend $2500+ on a new stove, we just plain out don't have the money for that. Gas will be around $150 in my truck and it'll be a fun time with my son and dad. I can probably sell the liner for something, hopefully to off set the gas and sell my old CW2500 for about $300, I think. I get it and hear what you all are saying. I've asked the seller for pictures of the inside, and more over all detailed pictures.

So the other more important thing I've been researching is this:

I've downloaded the Osburn 2400 manual and read through it. My hearth comes out 14". The insert's faceplate only allows the insert to go back 16.875" inches. That will leave 6.25" sticking out onto the hearth, with another 4.875 inches for the blower assembly. This will leave a little less than 3 inches between the end of the hearth and the blower assembly and 7.75inches between the end of the hearth and door/box. I guess I could always push it back as far as it can go into my fireplace and run it without the surround and/or fabricate an additional "tunnel" to bridge the gap between the blower air exit and surround? Wife would not approve it in place without a surround. She doesn’t prefer the look of roxul over the faceplate. Figures I have a huge fireplace but tiny hearth! (story of my life, am I right guys?!?!!? jk) My fireplace is 41" wide, 27" deep and 29" tall. Or could I just buy a hearth extender type mat and just put it down in front of the hearth?
 
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Easy Livin’ 3000

Minister of Fire
Dec 23, 2015
2,491
SEPA
Well, I did man up and tell her I was driving 10 hours round trip to get it, which she still disagrees with. It's my decision not to spend $2500+ on a new stove, we just plain out don't have the money for that. Gas will be around $150 in my truck and it'll be a fun time with my son and dad. I can probably sell the liner for something, hopefully to off set the gas and sell my old CW2500 for about $300, I think. I get it and hear what you all are saying. I've asked the seller for pictures of the inside, and more over all detailed pictures.

So the other more important thing I've been researching is this:

I've downloaded the Osburn 2400 manual and read through it. My hearth comes out 14". The insert's faceplate only allows the insert to go back 16.875" inches. That will leave 6.25" sticking out onto the hearth, with another 4.875 inches for the blower assembly, leaving a little less than 3 inches between the end of the hearth and the blower assembly and 7.75inches between the end of the hearth and door/box. I guess I could always push it back as far as it can go into my fireplace and run it without the surround and/or fabricate an additional "tunnel" to bridge the gap between the blower air exit and surround? Wife would not approve it in place without a surround. She doesn’t prefer the look of roxul over the faceplate. Figures I have a huge fireplace but tiny hearth! My fireplace is 41" wide, 27" deep and 29" tall. Or could I just buy a hearth extender type mat and just put it down in front of the hearth?
Love your conviction! I might feel the same way, if I was in your shoes. And, while I'd chose something different, it's your money, time, effort, etc. Good to stress test ones conviction from time to time.

I've a similar hearth situation as you. I put down a peice of cement board and sheet of metal, for temporary. Plans are to reframe the floor and make a permanent hearth in front to comply with the manual. It's been over 3 years now.

I don't think the hearth extender mat gets you to the values the sbi manual requires. But it will work if it's only temporary.
 

JMBoriss

New Member
Feb 10, 2019
42
Columbus, Indiana
Love your conviction! I might feel the same way, if I was in your shoes. And, while I'd chose something different, it's your money, time, effort, etc. Good to stress test ones conviction from time to time.

I've a similar hearth situation as you. I put down a peice of cement board and sheet of metal, for temporary. Plans are to reframe the floor and make a permanent hearth in front to comply with the manual. It's been over 3 years now.

I don't think the hearth extender mat gets you to the values the sbi manual requires. But it will work if it's only temporary.
Okay, yeah, honestly I don't think I'd ever spend the money to extend the hearth, my wife homeschools and I'm the bread winner and there's a list a mile long of other priorities I need to put our money to first. Anyways, what kind of hearth extender to you have? This is probably one area I don't want to go cheap one. We just remodeled our house and spent a lot on our wood floors that go right up to the hearth. No only do I not want to damage the floors, I ultimately don't want them to suddenly combust, as you can imagine! I was looking at one 48"x18" for around $100.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00LNGIFZ2/?tag=hearthamazon-20

Even if I have to buy two and stack on top of each other, I'll do it!
 

JMBoriss

New Member
Feb 10, 2019
42
Columbus, Indiana
Is the CFM CW2500 the same as the Drolet with the same model #?
Yes, and I've been told it's the same as the century CW2500 as well. I guess from what these guys have told me SBI makes Century Heating, Drolet, Valcourt, Obsurn, Caddy and Enerzone.
 
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Easy Livin’ 3000

Minister of Fire
Dec 23, 2015
2,491
SEPA
Okay, yeah, honestly I don't think I'd ever spend the money to extend the hearth, my wife homeschools and I'm the bread winner and there's a list a mile long of other priorities I need to put our money to first. Anyways, what kind of hearth extender to you have? This is probably one area I don't want to go cheap one. We just remodeled our house and spent a lot on our wood floors that go right up to the hearth. No only do I not want to damage the floors, I ultimately don't want them to suddenly combust, as you can imagine! I was looking at one 48"x18" for around $100.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00LNGIFZ2/?tag=hearthamazon-20

Even if I have to buy two and stack on top of each other, I'll do it!
Totally understand.

Those values in the manual are like Greek to me, but when I sat down and really applied myself, I saw that the only way I'd get there was to reframe the floor and pour a lightweight slab. It's mostly because the stove is sitting right on floor level (like yours). I'm no carpenter, and this is open heart surgery on the floor joists. I don't expect it to cost much, just the labor.

You'll need to hear from the experts on this one. Two pads stacked on each other raises your hearth extension well above the existing hearth and the stove bottom, and I don't know if this is ok or not. I do know I wouldn't like it. Your danger going that route is the junction of the existing hearth and the extension. If a hot coal gets to the wood floor, trouble could ensue.
 
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JMBoriss

New Member
Feb 10, 2019
42
Columbus, Indiana
So I got some pictures and talked to the guy selling it on the phone, he assured me there's no wrapped panels and it's never been over fired, he said it needs a good painting and cleaning and probably a couple of fire bricks. His wife was the one I've been texting and sending pictures to me up until now. They sound like a very sweet older couple. He actually drove to PA to pick this up new in 2010 he said since they didn't sell these in his area back then. Anyways, it looks like it needs a good sanding, cleaning and paint. I may buy new secondary air tubes and top bricks. Obviously new gaskets for door and glass. Totally recondition it for next season. I'd appreciate your thoughts.

IMG_3973.jpg IMG_3974.jpg IMG_3975.jpg
 
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Easy Livin’ 3000

Minister of Fire
Dec 23, 2015
2,491
SEPA
So I got some pictures and talked to the guy selling it on the phone, he assured me there's no wrapped panels and it's never been over fired, he said it needs a good painting and cleaning and probably a couple of fire bricks. His wife was the one I've been texting and sending pictures to me up until now. They sound like a very sweet older couple. He actually drove to PA to pick this up new in 2010 he said since they didn't sell these in his area back then. Anyways, it looks like it needs a good sanding, cleaning and paint. I may buy new secondary air tubes and top bricks. Obviously new gaskets for door and glass. Totally recondition it for next season. I'd appreciate your thoughts.

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The tubes are $50- each! Door gasket- $40, can of stove paint- $8.

Good plan, but don't replace the tubes unless they need it. Which they probably don't. Mine are thick stainless steel and I don't anticipate needing to change them for many years. Just take them out, give them a light sanding on the outside, run something through the inside (I use an oiled thin rag on a straightened coathanger), and reinstall.
 

JMBoriss

New Member
Feb 10, 2019
42
Columbus, Indiana
The tubes are $50- each! Door gasket- $40, can of stove paint- $8.

Good plan, but don't replace the tubes unless they need it. Which they probably don't. Mine are thick stainless steel and I don't anticipate needing to change them for many years. Just take them out, give them a light sanding on the outside, run something through the inside (I use an oiled thin rag on a straightened coathanger), and reinstall.
The tubes appear to be in good shape, I know when I redid my CW2500 I was impressed by how thick those were so I'm sure the 2400's will be just as, if not more thick.

Some questions: Does anyone have a wood stove paint preference? Do you prefer to spray it or paint/roll it on? I know they sell quarts of that stuff. How much do you think I should sell the liner for that came with the Osburn 2400? I think I paid around $600 plus for mine new. Not sure what the value of something like that is, used, if any. Also, what do you think my CW2500 is worth? I was planning on selling it for between $250-300. It was completely gone through last season, new gaskets, paint, some firebricks etc.

I think when installing the osburn 2400, I'm going to push it back as far as I can into the fireplace and where there's a gap between the blower air exit and faceplace I'm just going to create a little tunnel with sheet metal to bridge the gap. That way I can keep as much of my hearth free as possible while taking advantage of the 27" depth fireplace I have. I'll get a hearth extender as well.
 

Hogwildz

Minister of Fire
The tubes appear to be in good shape, I know when I redid my CW2500 I was impressed by how thick those were so I'm sure the 2400's will be just as, if not more thick.

Some questions: Does anyone have a wood stove paint preference? Do you prefer to spray it or paint/roll it on? I know they sell quarts of that stuff. How much do you think I should sell the liner for that came with the Osburn 2400? I think I paid around $600 plus for mine new. Not sure what the value of something like that is, used, if any. Also, what do you think my CW2500 is worth? I was planning on selling it for between $250-300. It was completely gone through last season, new gaskets, paint, some firebricks etc.

I think when installing the osburn 2400, I'm going to push it back as far as I can into the fireplace and where there's a gap between the blower air exit and faceplace I'm just going to create a little tunnel with sheet metal to bridge the gap. That way I can keep as much of my hearth free as possible while taking advantage of the 27" depth fireplace I have. I'll get a hearth extender as well.
Stove Brite, you can use a wire wheel on a drill to clean the surface rust off. Do yourself a favor, and don't even contemplate rolling paint on. Use the Stove bright and apply in thin layers. You don't need a ton thick coat.
Figure 1/2 the cost of new for the liner, and your pricing seems fair on the old insert.
See if the newer bricks in the old insert will work in the new one.
Don't bother painting the inside of the stove, it will burn off anyway.
 

JMBoriss

New Member
Feb 10, 2019
42
Columbus, Indiana
Yesterday my dad and I drove down to pick up the Osburn 2400, about 9 hour round trip. I used an engine hoist to load and unload it in the back of the truck. This morning I cleaned out the insert and took the pictures.

It'll definitely need to replace some parts but looks to be in great shape. I would like to hear your thoughts. In the spring/summer, I plan on taking it all apart completely getting rid of the rust and painting it with stove bright paint, and replacing all the gaskets for next season. Looking forward to fall/winter already.

Glass and door in good shape, just needs a good cleaning and paint.
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Secondary air tubes. The middle one is a little bent, is that okay to use as it or should I buy a replacement?
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Blanket weight and close up of air tubes:
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The below was what was used for the top baffle "C-Cast Baffle". Very light stuff, like a very light firebrick. To replace these, I need two at $70 a piece. I plan on replacing them but was wondering if anything else could be used that a little less expensive?
IMG_4005.jpg


Top of insert:
IMG_4015.jpg


Pieces pulled from the inside. According to the manual some are for holding in the firebricks. the other metals pieces were probably used to level the insert when it was in fireplace and just thrown in when removed, I can assume.
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Blower. It works and pushes a lot of air. Looking forward to having a blower with a temp switch.
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The back:
IMG_4024.jpg


Side. The air control is really hard to push in and out. Should I just put some grease to lubricate the moving parts?
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It's the bigger surround that Osburn sells so I lucked out. Seller wasn't able to measure before so I was hoping it wasn't the smallest one as it wouldn't cover completely my fireplace opening, but thankfully this one does.
IMG_4017.jpg


Manufactured 10/13/2009. Newer than both my cars, and house.
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Good firebricks vs. the cracked ones. Do you recommend I buy new ones to replace the cracked ones or can I try and just fit them back together best I can? If putting them back together should I use a bead of that cement fireblock caulk?
IMG_4019.jpg


Pieces to hold up the top baffle:
IMG_4018.jpg


Baffle insulation blanket, definitely needs to be replaced. $28 part or can I just use a thin cut of roxul?
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Air gap picture:
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Door. I think the seller used the wrong diameter gasket (too small) as the door doesn't completely seal that well. either way I plan to replace it next season.
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Inside firebox looking down:
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In, looking to the left:
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JMBoriss

New Member
Feb 10, 2019
42
Columbus, Indiana
Up and to the right:
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Up and to the left:
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Top with baffle and air tubes removed:
IMG_4009.jpg


In the firebox, looking up:
IMG_4013.jpg



I'd love to hear your thoughts.
 

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brenndatomu

Minister of Fire
Aug 21, 2013
4,259
NE Ohio
Wow, I'm a little surprised how much that thing looks like a larger version of my Drolet 1400i. I'd hafta look it up again, but I think this stove was manufactured within days of mine!
As for your questions...I'd get on fleabay (or wherever) and order ceramic insulation board, and blanket to replace your baffle materials...often times you can get enough to make 2, for half price...YMMV.
As for the firebrick...if you have some that are cracked, but still fit together tightly, and can be installed in a spot that ashes or gravity will hold things together with no issues, you could re-use some. That said, if you buy a box of bricks from the local big box, or TSC, they are only a 3-4 bucks each.
That center secondary tube doesn't look bad enough to replace to me...unless the baffle is not properly supported because if it, then maybe you can gently straighten it.
Once you get that all cleaned up, I'd put a couple heavy coats of rustoleum (or whatever) high temp paint inside that firebox...what is covered by firebrick, etc, will not burn off right away, the paint will help keep things from rusting over the summer months, when the humidity settles in there.
Congrats on a good deal and a successful trip!
Oh, and you might want to start a new thread about the new stove...and how it came to be.
 
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2fireplacesinSC

Burning Hunk
Feb 24, 2015
167
mid South Carolina
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