Floor of wood shed

stoveliker

Feeling the Heat
Nov 17, 2019
267
Eastern Long Island NY
I hope to build a woodshed this year. 3 bays of 5 wide and 9 ft deep ( 9*15 ft <144 sqft so no permit, and more than 2 cords per bay, which should be enough for me per year), open front and back, and some slats/boards with gaps on the sides.

The roof will slope to the back, likely metal. Overhang of 2 ft on front and back, and 1 ft on the sides.

I'm thinking to use concrete deck blocks (with the slots for pressure treated 2*6s) on 18"*18" concrete pavers. This will allow me to blow out leaves from under the shed (to keep it airy and dry). It will be a step up to get in, but so be it.

Questions:
-what separation between 2*6s should I have, given that I hope to stack up to 6-7 ft tall. (So, weight...).
-what floor should I make. I hate it when splits fall through to the ground (9*15 after all, so not easy to grab a split that falls in the middle), but air gaps seems to be a good idea to have the bottom dry better. My unimaginative mind says some type of 4'*8' underlayment with holes drilled in? What if rain water still gets onto this floor? Longevity? Should I slope the floor for drainage? We do have some high wind and rain here...

-finally, suggestions for metal roof panels and slope? The wife dislikes standard (wavy) corrugated metal... I think 2*4s should be enough there, as it only has to carry the metal (was not planning on first putting board down, but just to screw the metal into the 2*4s).

Apologies if some terminology is wrong; non-native speaker here. Any other advice is welcome.
 

Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
1,365
Northern Maine
I used 3X8 PT guardrail stock laid on the flat with about 4” between them for flow. Was getting really nervous about stepping between the boards, losing balance then snapping an ankle off.
I covered the floor with chain link fence and damn it’s safe now.

No way on a 2x4 rafter. 2x6 maybe on snow load but 1/2 plywood over the rafters works fine with metal corrugated roofing as the snow slides off.
 
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mcdougy

Minister of Fire
Apr 15, 2014
599
ontario
Are you planning using main beams with the deck blocks? Then nail your joists /use joist hangers to hang your joists from the main beams? Maybe a little sketch of what your kinda thinking? Then we can help you put it in motion OR call you names wondering how you have ever made it thru life !! Bahahaha.
 

Woodsplitter67

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2017
1,616
Woolwich nj
my floor is concrete paver caps(leftovers from work) The floor sits 6 inches above ground.. I use 4x4 pressure treated posts as the floor joist and the paver spacing is ever 5ft. Its set up this way because each one of my bins holds over 2 cords which is like 7000 lbs per bin.. thats alot of weight. on top of the floor joist is 5/8 x6 deck boards with an 1.75 in space inbetween each board to let air through..the walls are 2x4 and tied in well to the floor and roof. my 1 shed has 3 10ft bays so its over 21k lbs when full
 
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stoveliker

Feeling the Heat
Nov 17, 2019
267
Eastern Long Island NY
Are you planning using main beams with the deck blocks? Then nail your joists /use joist hangers to hang your joists from the main beams? Maybe a little sketch of what your kinda thinking? Then we can help you put it in motion OR call you names wondering how you have ever made it thru life !! Bahahaha.
Calling me names will likely be the result... :)

I don't have a sketch yet, but yes, I was thinking of a 2x6 rectangle supported at the corners, and once in the middle of the 9 ft side, and twice on the 15 ft side with the deck blocks. 4x4's going up at all those deck blocks as well. I will access the three bays from the 15 ft sides, so the 4x4s going up on the 15 ft sides also define the bays.
Then 9 ft long joists with joist hangers parallel to the 9 ft sides so that any gaps in my decking will run parallel to my access side. I think I will need some support for these too though in the middle...
 

stoveliker

Feeling the Heat
Nov 17, 2019
267
Eastern Long Island NY
I used 3X8 PT guardrail stock laid on the flat with about 4” between them for flow. Was getting really nervous about stepping between the boards, losing balance then snapping an ankle off.
I covered the floor with chain link fence and damn it’s safe now.

No way on a 2x4 rafter. 2x6 maybe on snow load but 1/2 plywood over the rafters works fine with metal corrugated roofing as the snow slides off.
Is the plywood needed?
The 2x4 rafter won't work because of the snow weight? So far it's not been crazy here, except for January '18. Normally snow here does not seem to add up; it thaws off before a next load comes in... (or I could rake it off).
 

mcdougy

Minister of Fire
Apr 15, 2014
599
ontario
Is the plywood needed?
The 2x4 rafter won't work because of the snow weight? So far it's not been crazy here, except for January '18. Normally snow here does not seem to add up; it thaws off before a next load comes in... (or I could rake it off).
If you run 2x4 9'+ overhang rafters on 16" o.c. I would consider 2x4 strapping on 24" o.c. (strapping will be a must for roof metal) if you put your rafters on 12" o.c. you could use 1x4 on 24" o.c. I would guess that using 1x strapping scenario may be more cost effective slightly.. For a building of low human occupancy this will work.
For the floor you could consider putting a row of your patio stones at centre span of your P.T. 9' joists. Then attach a p.t. block (leg) from the joist to the patio stone. If you bought 10' joists, the cutoff would probably work out for the leg. Don't bother fitting it under the joist, just attach it to the side of joist down to the patio stone.
For flooring 5/8 plywood would work, but you may want to consider more of a slated floor? If plywood is the choice which does have some benefits (clean up mostly) i would consider p.t. plywood.
The floor adds some expense and may be worth considering a hard look at its benefits? Those new black plastic skids on top of some 3/4 stone might look just as nice? Digging the deck blocks in might be a bit more aesthetically pleasing also?
What sort of soil are you dealing with? Personally I like to dig the post down the 4' vs a deck block. If the structure isn't fairly full of wood, you might be making a big kite, as there isn't much hope in addressing uplift.
I will get ready for the name calling i might receive for my suggestions.
 

WoodScrounger

New Member
Oct 11, 2020
42
Ontario
-finally, suggestions for metal roof panels and slope? The wife dislikes standard (wavy) corrugated metal... I think 2*4s should be enough there, as it only has to carry the metal (was not planning on first putting board down, but just to screw the metal into the 2*4s).
There is steel sheeting available that looks like clay tile or some that looks other types of shingles. Most of this type would require plywood or OSB sheeting for backer. I would recommend 2x6 rafters on 3/12 pitch.
For the floor I would use 2x? Or 5/4 deck boards spaced 1”-2” apart.
 

stoveliker

Feeling the Heat
Nov 17, 2019
267
Eastern Long Island NY
If you run 2x4 9'+ overhang rafters on 16" o.c. I would consider 2x4 strapping on 24" o.c. (strapping will be a must for roof metal) if you put your rafters on 12" o.c. you could use 1x4 on 24" o.c. I would guess that using 1x strapping scenario may be more cost effective slightly.. For a building of low human occupancy this will work.
For the floor you could consider putting a row of your patio stones at centre span of your P.T. 9' joists. Then attach a p.t. block (leg) from the joist to the patio stone. If you bought 10' joists, the cutoff would probably work out for the leg. Don't bother fitting it under the joist, just attach it to the side of joist down to the patio stone.
For flooring 5/8 plywood would work, but you may want to consider more of a slated floor? If plywood is the choice which does have some benefits (clean up mostly) i would consider p.t. plywood.
The floor adds some expense and may be worth considering a hard look at its benefits? Those new black plastic skids on top of some 3/4 stone might look just as nice? Digging the deck blocks in might be a bit more aesthetically pleasing also?
What sort of soil are you dealing with? Personally I like to dig the post down the 4' vs a deck block. If the structure isn't fairly full of wood, you might be making a big kite, as there isn't much hope in addressing uplift.
I will get ready for the name calling i might receive for my suggestions.
It's all sand with some rocks.
Good thought about the wind/kite. Will have to think about that.
 

firefighterjake

Minister of Fire
Jul 22, 2008
19,301
Unity/Bangor, Maine
I hope to build a woodshed this year. 3 bays of 5 wide and 9 ft deep ( 9*15 ft <144 sqft so no permit, and more than 2 cords per bay, which should be enough for me per year), open front and back, and some slats/boards with gaps on the sides.

The roof will slope to the back, likely metal. Overhang of 2 ft on front and back, and 1 ft on the sides.

I'm thinking to use concrete deck blocks (with the slots for pressure treated 2*6s) on 18"*18" concrete pavers. This will allow me to blow out leaves from under the shed (to keep it airy and dry). It will be a step up to get in, but so be it. I might respectfully suggest going with a minimum 2 x 8 or better yet 2 x 10 due to the weight of the wood. Granted, I am no engineer . . . and I tend to overbuild . . . but with my woodshed which I also built on concrete blocks I opted to go with either 2 x 10s or 2 x 12s . . . to be frank, without looking, I cannot remember which size it was. I do know I have had zero sagging, broken floor, etc.

Questions:
-what separation between 2*6s should I have, given that I hope to stack up to 6-7 ft tall. (So, weight...). I think I went with either 12 or 16 inch on center due to the weight concerns.

-what floor should I make. I hate it when splits fall through to the ground (9*15 after all, so not easy to grab a split that falls in the middle), but air gaps seems to be a good idea to have the bottom dry better. My unimaginative mind says some type of 4'*8' underlayment with holes drilled in? What if rain water still gets onto this floor? Longevity? Should I slope the floor for drainage? We do have some high wind and rain here... I used rough cut, green hemlock boards butted up together . . . although as the wood has dried out it has shrunk in a few places. Once dry, hemlock is particularly rugged and the rough cut boards give it some extra heft. I will say however that the wood in my shed only goes into the shed once it has been seasoned . . . any seasoning that occurs in the woodshed is perhaps marginal. I have never had any issues with rot, longevity, rain/snow/etc. and the shed has been standing since 2009.

-finally, suggestions for metal roof panels and slope? The wife dislikes standard (wavy) corrugated metal... I think 2*4s should be enough there, as it only has to carry the metal (was not planning on first putting board down, but just to screw the metal into the 2*4s).

Apologies if some terminology is wrong; non-native speaker here. Any other advice is welcome.
 
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St. Coemgen

Feeling the Heat
Feb 4, 2016
309
Hungary
www.stcoemgen.com
Personally, I just laid down some gravel, and run some very long rot resistant black locust splits and put the split fire wood on that. Never have any problems with rot and gives just fine airflow (my non-oak wood dries in one year). One can over engineer, think over all the possible issues, plan accordingly, and do a belt and braces construction in one wants. As for me, I am a minimalist. I do what works, but not much more. And the minimum I listed above works just fine for me (but your millage may vary).

For the roof I used polycarbonate sheets. They are expensive (more than I wanted to pay), but they are flat and look good which was a requirement by my wife since the wood shed is next to the house. :)
 

stoveliker

Feeling the Heat
Nov 17, 2019
267
Eastern Long Island NY

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
18,393
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
Forgive the possibly ignorant question, but where would I find/buy such pallets?
I got mine from the foam factory. Insulfoam. But I knew a guy. Plastic pallets are more universal and also flat on top.

Third choice is regular wooden pallets which will last much longer in a shed. You could add wood to mostly fill the gaps between boards or even sheet over them with plywood.

I’ve thought about pouring concrete or setting pavers and then buying cheap 2x4 sleepers for under the actual firewood.

I too learned to hate wooden pallets outside on the dirt. They rot, rusty nails, break, ankle twisters, etc.
 

stoveliker

Feeling the Heat
Nov 17, 2019
267
Eastern Long Island NY
I got mine from the foam factory. Insulfoam. But I knew a guy. Plastic pallets are more universal and also flat on top.

Third choice is regular wooden pallets which will last much longer in a shed. You could add wood to mostly fill the gaps between boards or even sheet over them with plywood.

I’ve thought about pouring concrete or setting pavers and then buying cheap 2x4 sleepers for under the actual firewood.

I too learned to hate wooden pallets outside on the dirt. They rot, rusty nails, break, ankle twisters, etc.
Hm, the wife vetoed this...‍♂