Glacier bay fireplace insert

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
3,827
NE PA
Probably mid 80's.

Anyone who does chimney cleaning, if you want a professional opinion on using fireplace or chimney as is.

After removal you will need to close off the opening into chimney flue. You may not require a secondary heat source in the Carolina's, but farther north, a secondary heat source is a necessity. Removal of existing appliance would only be to replace with an upgraded newer unit.

Craigslist, Facebook Marketplace, Ebay, Let go.......... There is also a classified section here.

Yes, there is a market for making a very inefficient fireplace a reliable heating source.

I'm not sure if this is actually an Insert, since I see no hot air outlet above the stove top. They made a flat top stove. Normally the fireplace faceplate had slots on the sides and a blower up the side of Insert to force air out from behind and out of the slots. A stove radiates heat into an area with radiant heat. An Insert normally has air flow around it with an optional blower to extract the heat from the back into the room. This is convection heat, which I don't see this having. (The faceplate shown was made for an Insert with air circulation around a firebox, which I don't see here. This one required the open type faceplate)

The many questions I would have is; Does it have a UL Listing tag, does the chimney have a full length liner connected to it, and if so why would you not want to use it for an emergency heat source? If you want something newer with glass doors, you will be required to install a liner the size of the newer insert. You may have something at least usable here.

This company was from upper NY state and was originally Gibraltar Stoves.
 

Frankdozer

Member
Aug 31, 2016
52
Maine
I have that exact stove that I use as a stand alone wood stove. Lots of heat output. But also uses lots of wood. Could be worth maybe $200, but who knows. Each buyer has different needs. I’m replacing mine with a Grandma Bear because I want the top outlet.
 

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Frankdozer

Member
Aug 31, 2016
52
Maine
FYI: This stove actually has a double wall on the bottom, back and underneath the top plate. The heating process was that room air was drawn in the double wall slot underneath the stove, heated thru to the back double wall and again thru the double wall just underneath the top plate and convected out the front slot to heat the room. Works great !!! The stove normally sat in the fireplace opening and on the hearth.
I think your lucky to have this stove in place with all the surrounds. And again.... it’s a Great Heater !!!!
It heats by convection.
I’ll post pictures of the intake and outlet slots.

ED1A1DCE-3A7C-40D8-B8DB-5BEE77DFED1A.jpeg
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,562
central pa
Thank you for this info. I will go back and pay attention to all these details you mention and take this into consideration as I decide what to do.
They really are not great heaters. And unless it is installed with a full insulated stainless liner it probably isn't safe to use anyway.
 

Frankdozer

Member
Aug 31, 2016
52
Maine
I’ve been heating with the same exact stove, an 1800 square foot house, 2 floors, since 2005. I use about 5 cords of wood per year. It’s easily controlled by the 2 front intakes. All my burning wood is 16” long. I really like this stove. I installed a baffle which needs replacement every 5 years. I have never bin worried about using this stove even a slight bit. Totally safe if within a full brick fireplace or sitting on a hearth as a stand alone wood stove. In the middle of winter I load it up at 11:00 at night and just about close the intake vents. I reload it at 6:00 am at which time there are plenty of red hot coals. I burn it hot so as there is almost never any chimney soot.
I have to say that everyone burns their stoves different so you decide for yourself what you want to do and if you want to discuss these stoves by phone then let me know and we will talk.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,958
South Puget Sound, WA
I’ve been heating with the same exact stove, an 1800 square foot house, 2 floors, since 2005. I use about 5 cords of wood per year. It’s easily controlled by the 2 front intakes. All my burning wood is 16” long. I really like this stove. I installed a baffle which needs replacement every 5 years. I have never bin worried about using this stove even a slight bit. Totally safe if within a full brick fireplace or sitting on a hearth as a stand alone wood stove. In the middle of winter I load it up at 11:00 at night and just about close the intake vents. I reload it at 6:00 am at which time there are plenty of red hot coals. I burn it hot so as there is almost never any chimney soot.
I have to say that everyone burns their stoves different so you decide for yourself what you want to do and if you want to discuss these stoves by phone then let me know and we will talk.
It's not very efficient. Adding the baffle helps and you are ahead of the game by burning good dry wood. A modern stove will use less wood and will have a nice fire view.
 

Frankdozer

Member
Aug 31, 2016
52
Maine
It is not as efficient as today’s stoves by any means but is as efficient as most Fisher stoves which are searched out and refinished to be used by more people than I can imagine. Just ask in this forum how many people like their Fisher stove. Proof is in the forum.
In my case I have 25 acres of birch and oak trees which I cut 2 years in advance so efficiency is of no concern. The Glacier Bay has double doors which open to have a nice fire view just like the Fisher Grandpa Bear and the Fisher Grandma Bear.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,958
South Puget Sound, WA
Yes, there is an aesthetic to those old tanks and their durability is to be appreciated. Still, as much as I like old Packards, I drive a modern car getting 3x the mileage. Considering that I am now buying our wood and no longer splitting it, a modern stove is a better fit for us, but I can also appreciate having a classic old friend reliably heating the house.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,562
central pa
I’ve been heating with the same exact stove, an 1800 square foot house, 2 floors, since 2005. I use about 5 cords of wood per year. It’s easily controlled by the 2 front intakes. All my burning wood is 16” long. I really like this stove. I installed a baffle which needs replacement every 5 years. I have never bin worried about using this stove even a slight bit. Totally safe if within a full brick fireplace or sitting on a hearth as a stand alone wood stove. In the middle of winter I load it up at 11:00 at night and just about close the intake vents. I reload it at 6:00 am at which time there are plenty of red hot coals. I burn it hot so as there is almost never any chimney soot.
I have to say that everyone burns their stoves different so you decide for yourself what you want to do and if you want to discuss these stoves by phone then let me know and we will talk.
If it is in a fireplace without a liner connected it is not safe plain and simple. Yours is hooked to a chimney through a crock not a fireplace which as long as everything is done right is perfectly safe.

Yes stoves like these and fishers Alaska's etc work ok. They will heat a house. But having used several old ones and several new ones there is no way I would ever consider going back to an old dinosaur like that to heat my house.

How do solid cast doors give a god fire view?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,562
central pa
I Love theses discussions !!!!!
All Opinions Matter !!! There is no right or wrong.
Ok ........ now let’s talk Politics
No there really is no right or wrong as far as if it is a good stove or not. That is a matter of opinion. But there is a right or wrong when it comes to safety. And we need lots more info to know if it is a safe install