Have wood now

weatherguy

Minister of Fire
Feb 20, 2009
5,360
Central Mass
If your tempted the cut a log on the pile make sure you watch that the tip of the bar doesnt hit a log behind it, dont ask me how I know. I prefer now to cut them on the ground with a couple pieces of wood to keep it an inch or two off the ground.
 

TheIndian

Member
Jan 11, 2018
119
Long Island
If your tempted the cut a log on the pile make sure you watch that the tip of the bar doesnt hit a log behind it, dont ask me how I know. I prefer now to cut them on the ground with a couple pieces of wood to keep it an inch or two off the ground.

Thanks Wxguy...I was thinking the same thing. Not looking for any lip from the new husky so I plan on rolling them off the pile and then up off ground a few inches with the Woodchuck dual....Ordered the extra jack stand for that. Still plan on being careful but this way I don’t have to worry about the tip coming in contact with adjacent logs.
Thx bro.
 

maple1

Minister of Fire
Sep 15, 2011
9,918
Nova Scotia
I like cutting right in place. Working in from the ends. Nice having the logs up off the ground that much, easier on the back. Need to exercise caution, of course.
 

velvetfoot

Minister of Fire
Dec 5, 2005
9,973
Sand Lake, NY
I like cutting right in place. Working in from the ends. Nice having the logs up off the ground that much, easier on the back. Need to exercise caution, of course.
Sometimes you can roll them lower, while still off the ground, and then buck them up, If they're cantilevered they'll just fall off, rather than pinch your saw. You'll probably already have wedges for that if you're going to split by hand.

If you cut the ends off the 'low hanging fruit', you have to be careful that the longer higher logs don't get you if you're in harm's way when you subsequently have to roll the shorter log.

If nothing else, trying to improve work flow keeps your mind occupied, and that's a good thing.
 

TheIndian

Member
Jan 11, 2018
119
Long Island
Thanks again guys for all your help.
I’m about 2/3 through those logs. Bucking, that is.


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Husqvarna working out great so far. And couldn’t have done a thing without the Woodchuck Dual either.

Couple minor issues with the 450 (hope they minor), maybe you guys could comment...

Had the chain lock up on me after about 5 or 6 cuts. Brought it back to dealer right away. Chainlock was definitely off but still not moving. Chain was also bone dry. What seemed to be jammed up was the little sprocket thing at tip of bar...jammed, wouldn’t move. They cleaned it free of debris, a little 3-in-1 oil and it was going again. All logs were off the ground and I didn’t recall bar tip ever touching the ground to get caught up with debris. Ever have bar tip sprocket jam up?

Unfortunately, the 450 I have doesn’t come with an adjustable oil pump. As long as there oil between chain and bar, it should be fine, right? When I rev saw towards ground, I see a little oil coming off but not as much as I’ve seen in videos or at the dealer when we were going over operations.

Lastly...ever get a little white smoke/burning smell upon cold startup? Saw dust in there burning perhaps? After about a minute, it gone but I noticed it like I said on cold startup only.

Thx
 

Tar12

Minister of Fire
Dec 9, 2016
1,536
Indiana
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I have had the bar roller tip freeze several times for different reasons...1 was a brand new bar that had excessive paint in the tip area...as soon as saw dust encountered the tip she locked right up..another bar came with the oiler hole mostly clogged with paint...dont forget to maintain the oiler hole and bar groove and flip your bar every other tank of fuel to maintain even bar wear. This is a must have tool IMO..chainsaw multi-tool..
 
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TheIndian

Member
Jan 11, 2018
119
Long Island
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I think I’m done....for now. Still have those huge rounds on the end to split but they gonna sit for a while. Thanks for all your advice on tools and stuff guys! Really really helpful.
Now to wait haha
What you think...two and a half cords maybe? Will have to measure.
 

Dug8498

Feeling the Heat
Jun 20, 2018
259
Southern NH
View attachment 243302


I think I’m done....for now. Still have those huge rounds on the end to split but they gonna sit for a while. Thanks for all your advice on tools and stuff guys! Really really helpful.
Now to wait haha
What you think...two and a half cords maybe? Will have to measure.
Nice! I would guess that’s probably 1.5 cords but it’s hard to tell exactly without measurements


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

sweedish

Member
Feb 6, 2019
98
Michigan
I’d get a bar that closely matches the max length of whatever size log you can fit in the stove and use that as your measuring stick, as far as a splitter, I’d look at what it costs to rent before buying, generally in business, if you can’t have something pay for itself in 7 years, you may not want to buy it, I think the same rule applies in life generally, 50 bucks a day to rent once a year vs 750 for a new one. However if you can snag up a deal go for it.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
2,776
Downeast Maine
I’d get a bar that closely matches the max length of whatever size log you can fit in the stove and use that as your measuring stick, as far as a splitter, I’d look at what it costs to rent before buying, generally in business, if you can’t have something pay for itself in 7 years, you may not want to buy it, I think the same rule applies in life generally, 50 bucks a day to rent once a year vs 750 for a new one. However if you can snag up a deal go for it.
This is how I felt about the hydraulic splitter as well, but you also need to take into account how much physical effort and the strain hand splitting puts on the body. Especially when you look at the size of the rounds he has to split. I found it worth the price to effortlessly split my heating fuel.
 
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The.Devo

New Member
May 26, 2018
26
MA
I’d get a bar that closely matches the max length of whatever size log you can fit in the stove and use that as your measuring stick, as far as a splitter, I’d look at what it costs to rent before buying, generally in business, if you can’t have something pay for itself in 7 years, you may not want to buy it, I think the same rule applies in life generally, 50 bucks a day to rent once a year vs 750 for a new one. However if you can snag up a deal go for it.
Although this is usually true, when it comes to my splitter, I can't tell you how many times I've gone out and split for an hour after dinner or even 30 minutes when I needed to kill some time. You can't do that when you have to drive and pick up a rental.
 

kborndale

Burning Hunk
Oct 9, 2008
155
LI
View attachment 243302


I think I’m done....for now. Still have those huge rounds on the end to split but they gonna sit for a while. Thanks for all your advice on tools and stuff guys! Really really helpful.
Now to wait haha
What you think...two and a half cords maybe? Will have to measure.

Why did you stack the wood directly on the ground?
 

Sawset

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2015
507
Palmyra, WI
Why did you stack the wood directly on the ground?
I think I see wood runners underneath.
Everything I have is stacked with just locust poles set underneath on the ground. By the time it's brought inside the garage or under a lean to for the winter, and mixed with all the rest, those on the bottom haven't been noticeably wetter. "Here" it may be ok - it may be a regional thing too given the reports of wet conditions in different parts of the country.

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