How to install united states stove co. model US3200E

  • Active since 1995, Hearth.com is THE place on the internet for free information and advice about wood stoves, pellet stoves and other energy saving equipment.

    We strive to provide opinions, articles, discussions and history related to Hearth Products and in a more general sense, energy issues.

    We promote the EFFICIENT, RESPONSIBLE, CLEAN and SAFE use of all fuels, whether renewable or fossil.

Chazzymmann

New Member
Oct 1, 2021
7
Texas
Hi y'all, I need some help. If someone could help me figure this out, I will be very grateful. We bought this new wood burning stove, united states stove co. model US3200E.
It looks like I am going to have to install it.
From floor to ceiling, it is 16 feet. There is a suspended ceiling at 10 feet from the floor.
There are no obstructions, no electric nearby, and it is a straight shot from where the stove is going and where it will exit the ceiling / roof.
I want to use double wall flue pipe.
An adapter to attach the stove pipe to the stove itself was not included with the new oven.
I started to try to build my parts list, and i have become confused about what I need.
I have a hot roll tar roof, with wooden ceiling supports that are at least 16 apart, if not 24 inches apart.
Do I need a ceiling support box? What purpose do those serve?
Can I just attach my 6 inch double wall flue pipe to the stove with an adapter, and then run the pipe out of the roof, put a vent cap on it, and call it good?
What kind of adapter do I need to attach my stove pipe to my stove proper? I noticed there are several different kinds of adapters....
The door to our building gets opened and closed a lot, raising the risk of smoke puffing out of the stove into our breathing air.
Do i need one of those stove pipe dampers, to reduce that risk?
thanks y'all
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,531
South Puget Sound, WA
In order to avoid confusion it should be noted that there is double-wall stovepipe and double-wall chimney pipe. They are not the same at all. Stovepipe is only for within the room envelope. It must transition to chimney pipe at the room exit. This setup has a couple of complications, the suspended ceiling and the flat tar roof. The chimney pipe is heavy and needs a support system. Stove pipe is lighter and connects the chimney pipe to the stove. It's often called connector pipe for this reason. There are roof brackets made that hold the chimney pipe on the roof. This could be used in lieu of a support box if there is no other alternative.

How is the suspended ceiling made? Is it a simple wireheld grid like one would find in an office?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Chazzymmann

Chazzymmann

New Member
Oct 1, 2021
7
Texas
In order to avoid confusion it should be noted that there is double-wall stovepipe and double-wall chimney pipe. They are not the same at all. Stovepipe is only for within the room envelope. It must transition to chimney pipe at the room exit. This setup has a couple of complications, the suspended ceiling and the flat tar roof. The chimney pipe is heavy and needs a support system. Stove pipe is lighter and connects the chimney pipe to the stove. It's often called connector pipe for this reason. There are roof brackets made that hold the chimney pipe on the roof. This could be used in lieu of a support box if there is no other alternative.

How is the suspended ceiling made? Is it a simple wireheld grid like one would find in an office?
Yes, it is suspended by wire grid.
I can basically support this pipe anyway i want to. my ceiling is made from wooden joists. the suspended ceiling is wired to the same joists.
Why is a support box square / rectangular? What do they do?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,531
South Puget Sound, WA
In a normal residence, the chimney support is nailed or screwed into a frame between the ceiling joists. A small portion shows below the ceiling in order shield the ceiling from heat radiating off of the stovepipe. If the home has a cathedral ceiling then often a black box is attached to the roof rafters or the roof itself. This acts as the support.

In this case, I don't know if code would allow stovepipe to pass above the suspended ceiling. bholler, what does code call for here?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Chazzymmann

Chazzymmann

New Member
Oct 1, 2021
7
Texas
In a normal residence, the chimney support is nailed or screwed into a frame between the ceiling joists. A small portion shows below the ceiling in order shield the ceiling from heat radiating off of the stovepipe. If the home has a cathedral ceiling then often a black box is attached to the roof rafters or the roof itself. This acts as the support.

In this case, I don't know if code would allow stovepipe to pass above the suspended ceiling. bholler, what does code call for here?
This is where the install is taking place, and this is the space above the suspended ceiling. I will be replacing the ceiling tiles around the stove, from the fiber tiles to some metal heat resistant tiles.

20210929_153613.jpg 20210929_154343.jpg
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,094
central pa
Typically I extend the support box down through the drop ceiling. But with that much drop I would probably figure out how to frame it so the support box is through the drop ceiling. Then a firestop at the actual ceiling level
 
  • Like
Reactions: Chazzymmann

Chazzymmann

New Member
Oct 1, 2021
7
Texas
Typically I extend the support box down through the drop ceiling. But with that much drop I would probably figure out how to frame it so the support box is through the drop ceiling. Then a firestop at the actual ceiling level
I have to admit I am not sure what you said.
After watching multiple videos on how to install wood burning stoves, I think i might have a better understanding of this process and theories.
The sole function of the ceiling support box is to solidify the chimney pipe. Right?
 

Chazzymmann

New Member
Oct 1, 2021
7
Texas
Typically I extend the support box down through the drop ceiling. But with that much drop I would probably figure out how to frame it so the support box is through the drop ceiling. Then a firestop at the actual ceiling level
And what does put a firestop at the actual ceiling level mean?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,094
central pa
I have to admit I am not sure what you said.
After watching multiple videos on how to install wood burning stoves, I think i might have a better understanding of this process and theories.
The sole function of the ceiling support box is to solidify the chimney pipe. Right?
The support box supports the chimney and provides proper clearance to combustibles. As well as providing a finished look.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Chazzymmann

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,094
central pa
And what does put a firestop at the actual ceiling level mean?
Any time you pass through a level of the house you need a firestop and probably an insulation shield as well. These components will all be available from what ever chimney manufacturer you use
 
  • Like
Reactions: Chazzymmann

Chazzymmann

New Member
Oct 1, 2021
7
Texas
The support box supports the chimney and provides proper clearance to combustibles. As well as providing a finished look.
So if i were to use double wall
Any time you pass through a level of the house you need a firestop and probably an insulation shield as well. These components will all be available from what ever chimney manufacturer you use
.....so a ceiling support box is a fire stop? what form would this firestop take, at the suspended ceiling level? If i were to remove 4 or six fiber ceiling tiles, and replace them with metal ceiling tiles, would that help or count?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,094
central pa
So if i were to use double wall

.....so a ceiling support box is a fire stop? what form would this firestop take, at the suspended ceiling level? If i were to remove 4 or six fiber ceiling tiles, and replace them with metal ceiling tiles, would that help or count?
Yes a ceiling support box serves as a firestop as well as a finish trim piece a support piece a radiation shield etc. You should probably have an insulation shield ontop of the support box to keep mice etc from nesting in the box. But where you pass through a floor or ceiling above that you need an additional firestop which is basically just a flat plate with a hole in the middle for the chimney to pass through and locating flanges to provide proper clearances.

I would not be comfortable running connector pipe through the drop ceiling. I honestly am not sure on the code there but I wouldn't do it regardless of what you do with the ceiling tiles.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,531
South Puget Sound, WA
Would a roof mount chimney holder work here, switching from chimney pipe to stove pipe when suitably below the drop ceiling?

RoofSupportKit_UltraTemp.jpg
 

SteveKG

Minister of Fire
Jun 23, 2009
714
Colorado Rockies
As I was reading this, I was thinking "roof mount chimney holder" just as begreen suggested. I have two of those in my ceiling [two stoves] and they are robust and secure and easy to work with. Selkirk in my case.

I don't have a drop ceiling, but it would be simple to add a length of chimney pipe on the bottom to get the chimney run down below the dropped ceiling.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Chazzymmann

Chazzymmann

New Member
Oct 1, 2021
7
Texas
As I was reading this, I was thinking "roof mount chimney holder" just as begreen suggested. I have two of those in my ceiling [two stoves] and they are robust and secure and easy to work with. Selkirk in my case.

I don't have a drop ceiling, but it would be simple to add a length of chimney pipe on the bottom to get the chimney run down below the dropped ceiling.
Yes, that is what i was thinking. If I am using the names correctly.....
from the floor to the drop ceiling is 10 feet. So i can get and use a short piece of double wall stove pipe, say 3 to 6 foot. Then some kind of an adapter ( i do not have the faintest idea what kind, what a good name is for whatever kind of adapter it is that i need....) to go from the stove pipe to the double wall chimney pipe.
the double wall chimney pipe needs to be attached to a fire stop, like a support box.
then that chimney pipe will go through the ceiling and roof, with a boot, and a chimney hold down bracket or 2 on the roof.
do I have that right?
 

SteveKG

Minister of Fire
Jun 23, 2009
714
Colorado Rockies
There are adapters to transition from the "chimney pipe" to the "stove pipe." I mean, every installation needs one. Typically, you use the same brand "chimney" and "stove pipe" so the manufacturer of the pipe can provide the correct transition piece. As to the stove collar to the stove pipe connection, this will depend on both the brand of stove pipe and the brand of stove. The stove manufacturer will be able to tell you which "adapter" you should use. By "adapter" I mean the piece you use to connect the stove pipe to the stove itself. The latest stove I bought, a Woodstock, I asked them to sell me the adapter for their stove. I knew which brand of pipe I would be using. They included the adapter in my order, so I didn't have to hassle with figuring out the correct one. I was willing to pay them for it because the previous stove I'd bought, I bought what I thought would be the correct adapter and it wasn't so I had to send it back to the vendor and get a different one. There are several pipe manufacturers and none, to my knowledge, of the different brands can use the same adapters. Nor can the strove pipe connect to a different brand of chimney pipe. However, I am not a pro so I could be corrected if this isn't the case.

As I said, if possible talk with the manufacturer [or at least vendor] of your stove and they can probably tell you which adapter to get according to which brand of pipe you buy. As in my case, they may well have them to sell.

One would think that the connectors [adapters] would be universal. One will be disappointed, they are not.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Chazzymmann