invest plant trees, to burn in 20 years

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This is an area where trees, or grain, o barley, they do not grow luxuriant, for this I want to convert into the forest, but yeah i really need something that could grow, I'm sure that in any case it won't take over, I put some today, We will see
 
I believe it! Trouble is, it is so prolific and successful that it is wiping out the native flora in my area. Direct correlation between it's appetite for carbon, to its success over other species. No thanks! The tulip poplar is probably as effective and plays very nicely with the other natives.

I don't want to be part of creating a Norway maple monoculture in my area. But, to each their own. If you could see what it's doing to the woods around here, and how chitty the woods look when the Norway's take over, I don't think you'd be so enthusiastic.
I’d take the maple over the tulip poplar for firewood. Lumber I’d take the poplar. Faster growing.

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very nice! I wanted to do something similar with an elm, but it's not as wide as yours. The carpenter told me that I should cut it and let it dry for at least 3 years before dividing it into planks, but I don't dare cut it anyway!
 
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hello everyone and happy 2023. I have land which I have earmarked for trees. I have elms, oaks, and small locust trees. I would like to continue planting varieties to be cut in 20-25 years, that are good growing, hardy, and good btus ratio. I'm near the river humidity is always present, exposure, quite good which trees do you recommend?
thanks
We're planting 10 spruce we're buying through our county, not for firewood but we're replacing a bunch of dead white pine that will hopefully give us or someone else privacy once they get tall enough.
 
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always looking for ideal plants, it seems that tree ash is also a good choice, good heat, quite good duration, and little ash, do you confirm? Because it should also be very adaptable to any terrain
 
always looking for ideal plants, it seems that tree ash is also a good choice, good heat, quite good duration, and little ash, do you confirm? Because it should also be very adaptable to any terrain
Ash was a great tree to plant or to own, around here. But I say "was" rather than "is" because the invasion of Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been destroying most of the Ash trees in North America. If it has not already invaded Europe, I suspect it is only a matter of time.

You'll find countless references to "EAB" on this forum. Many of us have been burning almost exclusively ash over the last few years, just trying to keep up with the deadfall.
 
Ash was a great tree to plant or to own, around here. But I say "was" rather than "is" because the invasion of Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been destroying most of the Ash trees in North America. If it has not already invaded Europe, I suspect it is only a matter of time.

You'll find countless references to "EAB" on this forum. Many of us have been burning almost exclusively ash over the last few years, just trying to keep up with the deadfall.
I seem to have read that ash had replaced diseased elms, to end up in the same way, absurd. Yes, now that I'm looking, in Switzerland they complain about this problem, but here in Italy also, anyway I have to put someone, if it grows and starts to get sick it will be one more reason to cut it!
 
I did! I started with 42 Norway Spruce on the neighboring side of the property line, before that lot sold to the new owner. Then I layered in two staggered rows of Leyland Cypress (fast growing, but short lived), fronted by two rows of hemlock, under an existing canopy of mixed walnut, maple, ash, and cherry. In front of that, I placed oaks, elms, birch, redbud, and a half dozen fruit-bearing trees. In areas where there were no walnuts, I sub'd more Norway Spruce instead of Leylands (Norways don't like walnut), and I sub'd a row of green giant Arborvitae in areas where neither of those would work.

At time of planting, all evergreens were 8 - 12 feet (2.4 - 3.7 meter) tall, and the deciduous trees were all 10 - 14 feet (3.0 - 4.3 meter) tall, which was done in phases 2013 - 2020. This "garden" built between my yard and the newly-built house behind me varies from 40 to 100 feet (12 to 30 meter) deep, over a 300 foot (90 meter) section of our property line.

After that, I scattered another dozen oaks, elms, and hawthorns around the yard, in areas left open by things taken down by hurricanes Irene and Sandy. This was a residential yard project, albeit a rather large residential yard, not a wood lot.
Please post pictures of your yard. Sounds nice.
 
Please post pictures of your yard. Sounds nice.
It was, until a week ago! An excavator was here all day digging a pool and trenches, and now I have a mountain of dirt as big as the house sitting in the middle of the back yard.

Here are some older photos.

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