Is celtis australis (hackberry) a good tree for consolidation soil?

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Prometeo

Minister of Fire
Jan 7, 2022
563
IT
hi, I'm looking for trees to maintain the land, on a slope, but also for shade, was it a good choice in central Italy?
 
No idea? Don't you guys have lots of olive trees there?
 
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We had hackberry in our back yard in Kansas. They did ok in the heat and cold. Every year we would hit 40C or higher. Winter lows were often-10 to 20C. They were not pretty. Had a leaf gal. I don’t remember them growing really fast.

When is come to erosion control think brushy understory plants. For shade they did well. I forget how much rain you get. Hills can be hard. Are they native? What native trees like the hills?
 
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We had hackberry in our back yard in Kansas. They did ok in the heat and cold. Every year we would hit 40C or higher. Winter lows were often-10 to 20C. They were not pretty. Had a leaf gal. I don’t remember them growing really fast.

When is come to erosion control think brushy understory plants. For shade they did well. I forget how much rain you get. Hills can be hard. Are they native? What native trees like the hills?
These would be maximum and minimum temperatures here also, approximately, precipitation 20-25 inches, annually, it seems from the statistics, in this area there are white poplar, elm, quercus cerris, but also, pines, the hackberry is however a tree that lives throughout Italy, but they say it is a forgotten tree, and therefore there is little information, that's why I asked here. Thank you very much
 
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It would be good to meet with a local agronomist to discuss local and native species as well as the soil type on the land to seek the best solution.
 
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To get anything started well, and especially on a hill, you should consider watering for the first few years. And even then we have had dry years that killed lots of established trees.
 
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thanks @begreen you are right, at least a soil analysis would be appropriate, but since I don't have to do an activity it will only be trees to slightly maintain the soil which would be ok even without trees, being little slope, I think I can take some risks

thanks @EbS-P I'm conscious that water will be needed, for every tree, in the first years, during the summers, I really like the drip system, I placed some weeping willow branches, before summer, they gained almost 1 meter with this system
 
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Willow trees like moist soil. They grow best in damp areas. What native Italian tree or bush species are there that can improve the soil with a minimum of water?
 
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@begreen Celtis australis is probably an excellent example, little water, sink roots into all soils in the past in this area people used arizona cypress, and Aleppo pine, now it seems there are other trends. Ash and lime are highly recommended, but a further peculiarity would be to also use evergreens which would tend to dry out the soil when it is loaded with water, I think I will put different types of trees. Yes, the willow needs water, I got some branches from my wife's father who has 3 of these and doesn't pay much attention, but they are very large and solid, but he prunes often I must say.