Lawn care

Ashful Posted By Ashful, Jun 20, 2017 at 6:42 PM

  1. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu
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    Here's my theory on lawns. If its green, mow it and call it "the lawn". Not green? Well then you probably don't even need to mow it.
     
  2. jatoxico

    jatoxico
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    What have you found to be most effective against nutsedge, treatment or just crowd it out? My neighbor, who does almost nothing, actually does worse than nothing, he periodically scalps the yard creating a weed factory including a healthy dose of sedge.

    In all my years of cutting grass I don't ever recall seeing sedge until fairly recently but it wants to take over.
     
  3. Ashful

    Ashful
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    Nutsedge is one of the toughest weeds, you pretty much have to go with one of the sedge-specific herbicides to kill it. Also, understand it's life-cycle. It puts out new tubers each season, and each tuber has a 3-year life, which makes it a tough one to kill.

    The only thing I've found effective against it is Dismiss, and the price for that wee-lit'l 6 oz. bottle will make your head spin, until you realize that little bottle will treat a full acre of the stuff. Don't even bother with 4D stuff, or even Surge / Escalade2 level stuff, go right to Dismiss or Sedgehammer.
     
  4. jatoxico

    jatoxico
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    It's a toughy alright. Even after it's under control there's no real viable way to manage it at all by manual weeding.

    Treated once with a sedge specific treatment designed to affect the foliage. I've read Dismiss works the same way. Seeing fast results but read that because this type only starves the tubers it can take a couple treatments. Sedgehammer may be the better choice since it treats the tubers.
     
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  5. JoshuaJordan

    JoshuaJordan
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    Hi there, implementing good techniques and timing for your lawn care can lead to less effort for maintaining it.
     
  6. Ashful

    Ashful
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    I can't say anything negative about Dismiss, since it's the best thing I've tried so far. But maybe I'll have to give Sedgehammer a better look, next year. I just sprayed my nutsedge on Jul.4, so I'm done for this year.
     
  7. jharkin

    jharkin
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    I really wanted to just say screw it and do nothing with the lawn... problem is that alternating years of monsoon and drought have now killed large sections and around here we get creeping charlie (lawn ivy) that takes over and that's probably as hard to kill - and uglier - than Ashful's nutsege problem.

    I still wouldn't care except that we plan to sell and move in the next 2-4 years and a lawn that looks like an abandoned lot doesn't fly with prospective buyers....

    I dont and never will install sprinklers though.
     
  8. jatoxico

    jatoxico
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    Ive found creeping charlie is fairly easy to control and doesn't seem to spread too quickly. One application of weed b gon took care of the majority of my problem. Sedge is is a different kettle pf fish.
     
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  9. Ashful

    Ashful
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    Creeping Charlie is fairly easy to control, even using over-the-counter remedies. Nutsedge is six levels removed from it, in terms of difficulty and cost!

    Ground ivy thrives in shady areas on thin turf, so if you have thin areas left by prior years' droughts, this year's cloudy and wet weather probably has that stuff growing nicely. Triclopyr, Dicamba, or 2,4-D all control ground ivy, to some degree. Since we're only a few weeks out from annual weed-kill for overseeding purposes (and you'll hit it sooner than me), I'd be ready to hit that lawn with Surge as soon as the chance of heatwave has passed. I usually do this mid-late August, in preparation for overseeding in mid-September. You need 3 weeks post-Surge, before you can over-seed, and you want your new seed down at least 4 weeks (preferably 6 weeks) before soil dips below 55F. This creates a very narrow window to hit, if you don't like wasting money on seed.

    http://www.domyownpestcontrol.com/msds/Surge-Label.pdf
     
  10. jharkin

    jharkin
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    For many years I had been trying to avoid herbicides altogether (dont want the kids being exposed to it, or myself for thatmatter) but now Ive had to give in. Last year I hit all the trouble spots with Weed-b-Gone Max which slowed it down but didn't kill it. Like you suspect its come back worse then ever in this monsoon so yesterday I bombed the entire lawn with a Bayer ground ivy control product that's Triclophyr based. We have had good rain lately and temps are predicted to be in the 70s for hte next couple weeks so its seems like a good window to do it without stressing the lawn.

    I'll let you know if it worked and check into that product you linked if it didnt.
     

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