Metal Roofing vs Shingle Roofing

christysk Posted By christysk, Mar 16, 2018 at 5:35 AM

  1. christysk

    christysk
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 16, 2018
    1
    0
    Loc:
    Greensboro
    Hello Members,

    Which roofing type will you choose Metal roofing or shingle roofing?

    Thank you
     
  2. johneh

    johneh
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 19, 2009
    1,539
    604
    Loc:
    Eastern Ontario
    Metal is a little more expensive
    But lasts a life time .
    I have always used shingles
    If I had to do it over again
    (Thinking about down sizing)
    I would dig a little deeper into
    my pockets and bought metal
    wood have saved money in the long run
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  3. Ashful

    Ashful
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 7, 2012
    11,871
    5,275
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    I have a mix of roofing on our house:

    1. True raised seam steel on main house. It is starting to rust a little at soffet after 25 years.

    2. Asphalt, on additions, just starting to have a few slide loose from their nails after 23 years.

    3. Cedar shake on porches and old summer kitchen, looks very aged and covered in moss and barnacles, but still holding up great at 25 years.

    4. Aluminum penetrating fastener agricultural roofing in barn, still perfect after 20+ years.

    In addition, my old house had copper roofing from 1953, still in perfect condition, and tin raised seam from 1983 also still in perfect condition.

    The aluminum roofing is the cheapest ABM Panels, but maybe not suitable for houses, I usually only see it in barns.

    Asphalt is cheap, and everyone knows what they’re getting. No elaboration needed.

    If going metal, I’d spend extra for better materials, since labor ain’t free and it’s depressing watching steel rust.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  4. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 17, 2008
    5,351
    996
    Loc:
    Eastern Central PA
    Have seen a few slate roofs go on recently ,heard they last 100+ years. My own slate roof was on for about 80 years. Probably could have fixed the few loose tiles and got another 50 years out of it. Only reason they were loose is the nails rusted away. The asphalt shingle roof that replaced it is nearing the end of its useful lifespan at about 20+ years. I already replaced (3yrs ago) the north side porch roof that gets very little sun. Its was disintegrating for several years before it was replaced.
    Iv notice the BLACK asphalt shingles seem to last much longer. I have one on another house close to 30 yrs and its still watertight and looks great.The worst part again, is that which never gets any sun. Seems to rot.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  5. Wooden Head

    Wooden Head
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 14, 2009
    171
    21
    Loc:
    West Michigan
    Without question, steel roof. Mine cost me about 20% more than asphalt. Have had it for 8 years without a problem. Mine has hidden fasteners.
     
  6. Montanalocal

    Montanalocal
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 22, 2014
    258
    195
    Loc:
    Helena MT
    I replaced my roof about 10 years ago, and went with the 50 year Elk shingles with a class A fire rating. They are not asphalt, but fiberglass. They are keeping up very well. I would never install metal, because it is so slipery, I need to climb my roof frequently to clean my chimney.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  7. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 12, 2006
    6,287
    782
    Loc:
    Schenectady, NY
    Depends on the situation.

    First, would your house stick out like a sore thumb if you chose a different roof than your neighbors? No reason to lose property value over this decision.


    How long will you be in the house? If you were going to be in the house a long time, then longevity of the roof comes into play as you don't want to put on multiple roofs, and any additional cost of the metal will be spread out. If you only plan to be in it for a few years, I'd choose the cheapest option as you'd never realize the benefits of a metal roof.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  8. moey

    moey
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 12, 2012
    1,440
    356
    Loc:
    Southern Maine
    I assume Greensboro is NC. In the north a lot of folks like metal roofs because they greatly reduce the chance of ice dams. Where you are that benefit isnt really important.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  9. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 17, 2008
    5,351
    996
    Loc:
    Eastern Central PA
    The new Architectural Style asphalt shingles seem to be holding up well ,they are thicker and have a longer warranty. About the best looking too.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  10. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 22, 2008
    18,395
    4,484
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    Steel roof for me.

    Back in 1995 when I moved into the house I knew we would have to replace the roof . . . and did so around 2000. Went with the 25 year shingles . . . which lasted maybe 15 years.

    Opted at that point to go with standing seam metal . . . it costs a bit more, but should last my life time. More over, I have to do very little to any roof raking.

    When I did the garage last Summer we opted for steel again . . . this time with the screw down metal roofing to save a bit of money.

    This Summer when I redo the roof on my woodshed I suspect I'll go with steel yet again.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  11. drz1050

    drz1050
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 11, 2014
    791
    194
    Loc:
    Ballston Lake, NY
    Another vote for metal roofing here. Ideally copper, but that's only an option if budget is not a concern at all.
    Standing seam steel takes a long long time to rust through if it's not that paper thin stuff. I got mine done with 24 ga galvanized then painted panels from Englert. One single panel from the ridge all the way to the eave, so it's almost impossible for it to leak. The thicker the gauge, the better.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  12. peakbagger

    peakbagger
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 11, 2008
    3,715
    944
    Loc:
    Northern NH
    Galvalume roof with Kynar coating installed over ice and water shield underlayment on a wood or plywood deck (no chip board). If plywood is used, increase the thickness over the minimum.

    The type of attachment system is important. Mechanically seamed or snap lock seams with the roof attachments completely covered. Forget exposed metal fasteners with resilient washers, eventually the washers fail.

    Its pretty rare for a steel roof membrane to fail, but the devil is in the details and that is where a good installer following manufacturers recommendations makes the difference. I have run into several perfectly good roofs that had to be ripped off due to bad details. Rotting of the roof deck from water coming back up from the lower edge due to poor drip edge details or ice damming in gutters seems to be a popular failure. Roof penetrations also are a weak point in any roof. Oatey style rubber roof boots have a limited life, far shorter than the surrounding roof and replacing them can screw up a good roof job.

    I know a few builders that will minimize roof penetrations by running the stack vents up under the roof deck to the ridge line and will install center chimneys along with making sure that underground power is installed so there are no electrical risers going up through the roof. While on the road over the last few weeks where there have been heavy snow falls I see many examples of snow slabs held up on the roof by roof penetrations. The lower part of the roof is clear but penetrations are holding the upper section of snow from sliding. I some cases it will snap off the stack vents but no matter what it put a lot of stress on the flashing details.

    Many claims have been made about the Tesla Solar Roof, the claim is its a 100 year roof but few if any details on the system have been released. I highly suspect that the roof may last 100 years but the actual PV is another story.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    sloeffle and firefighterjake like this.
  13. semipro

    semipro
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 12, 2009
    3,374
    571
    Loc:
    SW Virginia
    ^I agree pretty much with all of what @peakbagger said but feel that the self adhering Ice and Water Shield is overkill given the quality of now available synthetic underlayments (e.g. Grace Tri-Flex). Don't even consider using tar paper fro underlayment.
    As with most things, the devil is in the details with things like how you stack vents are handled. In general you want to rely upon gravity for sealing rather than sealants.

    Edit: the roof I'm currently replacing with metal is a 50-year fiberglass shingle roof that started leaking a and falling apart at about 30 years. Composition shingle warranties are probably a good indicator of value relative to other composition shingles but I wouldn't bet on the roof lasting out the warranty period. OTOH, metal roofs have well demonstrated their longevity.

    Edit: federal tax credits may also apply
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    sloeffle likes this.
  14. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 12, 2006
    6,287
    782
    Loc:
    Schenectady, NY
    In all fairness, a roof that first pays for itself, then lasts an additional 80 to 90 years, isn't a bad deal.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    Ashful likes this.
  15. Ashful

    Ashful
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 7, 2012
    11,871
    5,275
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    I’m surprised to see so many recommendations for raised seam steel. Yes, mine may last 80 years, but it will look so ratty before half of that time has passed, that I will replace it. My steel roof is actually installed over an old cedar shake roof, that from the underside I can see, appears to actually be in good shape. Neither here nor there, and I don’t know if those shakes are 100 or 250 years old, but interesting to me.

    The only way I’m doing raised seam again is if it’s something better than steel, likely copper in my case, but you should at least consider galvalume. Regular steel roofing sucks for longevity.

    Surprised no one has mentioned synthetic slate, yet. Extremely popular, here, the new house behind mine just got it.

    Natural slate can last 100’s of years, but traditional nails rust out after 75 years, and they start falling. Repair with stainless nails, and your great-great grandkids will admire your work.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  16. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 12, 2006
    6,287
    782
    Loc:
    Schenectady, NY
    I've been on raised seam roofs that were coated with bedliner or something similar. It was nice to have a bit of additional grip up there.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  17. peakbagger

    peakbagger
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 11, 2008
    3,715
    944
    Loc:
    Northern NH
    I will buy that, I am used to ice and water shield as it self heals so well, I havent mucked with the apparently available replacements. As long as the underlying underlayment can act as secondary waterproof shield and can self heal as a way of routing any leaks down and out the lower edge of the roof I expect it would work fine.

    I do dread an upcoming 30 year asphalt fiberglass reinforced shingle replacement on my south exposure in the next 5 or 10 years as I have PV and SHW panels int the way. It has 100% ice and water shield coverage so I expect I will remove the panels from one side and store them on the other side rather than rigging them back down off the roof. I have never stripped a roof with ice and water shield and wonder how easy it will be to bust them off with shingle shovel as one thing good with tar paper is that the shingle shovel slides right under the paper.

    Its odd I was there when the house went in and finished it myself plus built the garage myself a year later and have lived here long enough that I need to start worrying about roof replacements, didnt think that would happen.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  18. Highbeam

    Highbeam
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 28, 2006
    14,257
    2,908
    Loc:
    Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
    For reference, three tab shingles cost 30 cents per sf and is a homeowner job. the cheapest face screwed metal costs 1$ per sf plus all the custom bits. That’s material cost in the pnw.

    I was going to go cheap with metal on my woodshed but going metal was triple the cost!
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  19. drz1050

    drz1050
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 11, 2014
    791
    194
    Loc:
    Ballston Lake, NY
    Why not repaint it?
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  20. 3fordasho

    3fordasho
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 20, 2007
    741
    150
    Loc:
    South Central Minnesota
    I have a 60x104 pole shed with exposed fastener steel roof, built in 1984. I purchased the place in 2014 and soon discovered the roofing nails with the rubber washers under the head all leaked. Pretty much rained inside as much as out. The white paint on the roof steel was all but gone leaving only galvanized finish. This heats up much more than white, causing more movement and more nails coming loose. After many weekends on the roof, pulling loose nails and replacing with screws/rubber seals and repainting the entire roof white, it is 99% leak free. Maintenance free it is not. Also the foam seals at the ridge all dried up and went away resulting in a strip of snow on the floor right down the center of the building.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    Ashful likes this.
  21. maple1

    maple1
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 15, 2011
    8,338
    1,546
    Loc:
    Nova Scotia
    I will never buy asphalt shingles again. From my experience & similar of neighbours & others I have talked to - I would expect to get no longer than 1/2 of their rated life out of them. We had 30 year shingles and they needed replacing before that. I put it off until year 15 but likely shouldn't have, had one leak develop. They just seemed to disintegrate, even with properly vented attic & proper installation. They were quite exposed though, lots of wind.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  22. coutufr

    coutufr
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 16, 2017
    162
    55
    Loc:
    Montréal
    Galvalum + fasterners without the washers
     
  23. maple1

    maple1
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 15, 2011
    8,338
    1,546
    Loc:
    Nova Scotia
    Why no washers?
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  24. peakbagger

    peakbagger
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 11, 2008
    3,715
    944
    Loc:
    Northern NH
    My house had 20 year shingles when it was new but they were starting to look "shabby" around 18 years on the south exposure. I stripped it and covered the entire exposure with ice and water shield before putting 30 year double tabs shingles. The bummer was I had the chimney ripped down to the roof line due to "issues" and the contractor did a great job on the chimney but was hard on the shingles.

    The north exposure was looking good at 25 but I had them replaced. My garage roof had 20 year shingles and they are still looking good after 25. I do plan to replace them one of these years.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  25. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 17, 2008
    5,351
    996
    Loc:
    Eastern Central PA
    Iv got a black standard 3 tab shingle roof on approaching 30 years . Still good. Also have a few architectural asphalt shingle style roofs on 10 to 15 years (black also) and still look like new. About $80 to $90 a square for those.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...

Share This Page