Mystery Wood Boiler

OldHomesAreFun

New Member
Jul 21, 2020
3
Hockessin, DE
Can anyone identify this stove? There are no markings on it anywhere to indicate a manufacturer. I have been all over it, including on the floor with a flashlight looking for clues. It may have been purchased in Lancaster County, PA. It was installed in 1981. I saw another stove similar to this on a thread I can no longer find. The person described it as a wood cookie monster. Our mystery boiler is still working to heat a passive solar home (with
the help of a heat pump) DSCF2312.JPG but either needs a rehab or a replacement. Our HVAC contractor friend has offered to rehab it to bring it up to code, but I can not find a booklet, receipt, or a scrap of paper relating to it. My husband built our home, but now has Alzheimer's so can not lend more information on it.
 

maple1

Minister of Fire
Sep 15, 2011
10,484
Nova Scotia
Have seen those before, name escapes me by someone may be along with one.

I am curious on what exactly your HVAC guy is going to do in the rehab department though, those are very inefficient burners, from what I have read and can see. Which I doubt can be improved on.
 
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hobbyheater

Minister of Fire
Nov 14, 2011
1,134
It is called the Furnace Works. For a very primitive boiler we used it in standby demand mode and it was able to keep up. My daughters who were 6 and 7 years of age at the time, called it the PIG because it looked like one and ate wood like one! It consummed 22 cords of Douglas fir in one year. An early gasification boiler, a Jetstream with 1000 gallons of storage, does the same job burning only 4 cords a year. In the classified section of this site, there is a never installed new Jetstream.
 

OldHomesAreFun

New Member
Jul 21, 2020
3
Hockessin, DE
Have seen those before, name escapes me by someone may be along with one.

I am curious on what exactly your HVAC guy is going to do in the rehab department though, those are very inefficient burners, from what I have read and can see. Which I doubt can be improved on.
I came to the same conclusion myself after reading about the evolution of wood boilers. Thanks.
 

OldHomesAreFun

New Member
Jul 21, 2020
3
Hockessin, DE
It is called the Furnace Works. For a very primitive boiler we used it in standby demand mode and it was able to keep up. My daughters who were 6 and 7 years of age at the time, called it the PIG because it looked like one and ate wood like one! It consummed 22 cords of Douglas fir in one year. An early gasification boiler, a Jetstream with 1000 gallons of storage, does the same job burning only 4 cords a year. In the classified section of this site, there is a never installed new Jetstream.
Thanks for the identification. I did a little more digging thanks to you, and found all the information I needed on the stove. I think we'll replace it.