New rear flue stove for cabin

Stovecoast

New Member
Jul 27, 2019
4
02118
Hello,

I am looking to replace an old, rusted out, rear-flue wood burning stove. The stove sits on a brick hearth. The rear vent pipe is 6” in diameter with the bottom edge of the pipe 21” above the base of the stove. The pipe runs out of the back of the stove, passes through a collar in the hearth and then through the wall to the exterior of the cabin (see photo).

I would like a new wood stove that uses the existing flue set-up but I have heard and read that rear-flue stoves draw poorly. Is this always the case? Can this be remedied with a blower or some other part of the design? Is there a new stove brand and model that would work for this situation?

I also wonder if the existing pipe collar in the back wall is wide enough for the current insulation requirements.

I am new to wood stoves. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks!
 

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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,648
South Puget Sound, WA
Look at Woodstock stoves. The Woodstock Ideal Steel might just work. Their Fireview would also work, but that may be a budget buster. Also look at the Hampton H300 with the short leg kit. It would work, but would need to be raised a couple inches, maybe with a brick under each foot. Another option would be to remove and redo the hearth at a lower level.

Long horizontal runs of stove pipe do spoil draft, but the real issue is usually with chimney height and the chimney flue diameter. How tall is the cabin's chimney? What is the chimney liner diameter?
 

Stovecoast

New Member
Jul 27, 2019
4
02118
Thank you for the reply.

The 6" pipe passes through the brick hearth and straight to the exterior of the building (i.e. there is no brick chimney). See the exterior stovepipe in the attached photo.
 

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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,901
central pa
Thank you for the reply.

The 6" pipe passes through the brick hearth and straight to the exterior of the building (i.e. there is no brick chimney). See the exterior stovepipe in the attached photo.
You need a chimney as well as a stove. What you have is completely unsafe.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,648
South Puget Sound, WA
Yes, that is totally improper and dangerous and no modern stove would function well on it.
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
17,484
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
Wow, picture #1 we start salivating at all of the options and then #2, whoa! Death trap!

All single wall “chimney” right next to those ultra flammable wood shakes.
 

Stovecoast

New Member
Jul 27, 2019
4
02118
_g:eek: Uh oh! :)
Would new (double-walled?) pipes in the same set-up (i.e. with the horizontal pipe from the rear of stove, and the elbow and long vertical pipe on the exterior, along with support brackets) be safe, or is the whole arrangement unsafe? What alternative set-up would work? Thanks!
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,901
central pa
_g:eek: Uh oh! :)
Would new (double-walled?) pipes in the same set-up (i.e. with the horizontal pipe from the rear of stove, and the elbow and long vertical pipe on the exterior, along with support brackets) be safe, or is the whole arrangement unsafe? What alternative set-up would work? Thanks!
Yes if it is a proper complete chimney system. And you can move it up at that time so you can have different stove options.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,901
central pa
Wow, picture #1 we start salivating at all of the options and then #2, whoa! Death trap!

All single wall “chimney” right next to those ultra flammable wood shakes.
I didn't expect that bad but I did expect a bad wall passtrough
 

Stovecoast

New Member
Jul 27, 2019
4
02118
Thanks for the responses. The link is very helpful. The masonry crock tube in that post looks very familiar!

On the plus side, the brick hearth has the necessary 12” solid masonry on all sides of the masonry tube.
Too bad the tube is (probably) dangerously close to 2x4s inside the wall, not to mention is touching wood shingles!

Does anyone know of posts that get into the specific situation of installing a wall pass-through to connect to an exterior metal chimney (i.e. passing through an external wood-framed wall rather than into an existing masonry chimney)? [I searched the forums but did not find any]. Specifically I am wondering about what parts and clearances I would need to make the existing masonry crock tube safe as it passes through the wall and to the outside of the building, or whether it would be better to scrap the crock and use a thimble.

In my situation I am thinking a new, safe pass-through and chimney would mean:
  1. installing a thimble / new pass-through (either removing the existing masonry crock or adapting it, or closing it up and installing a thimble higher up on the wall)
  2. as part of the thimble installation: opening up the wall from the exterior of cabin (i.e. removing the shingles, and a section of the wall boards), and reconfiguring the studs and framing to get the necessary clearances.
  3. connecting the horizontal pipe to a tee and a double-walled chimney on the outside of the cabin (with the necessary brackets and roof bracing).
Does that sound about right?

Alternatively, I could also forget the wall pass-through, opt for a new stove with a flue on top, and run a new chimney straight through the roof. While I’d like to use the existing rear flue it seems like the vertical chimney would be a less expensive and complex installation and would also widen my choice of stove (since it would not have to have a rear flue at a specific height). What do think? Pros/cons?
 

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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,901
central pa
Thanks for the responses. The link is very helpful. The masonry crock tube in that post looks very familiar!

On the plus side, the brick hearth has the necessary 12” solid masonry on all sides of the masonry tube.
Too bad the tube is (probably) dangerously close to 2x4s inside the wall, not to mention is touching wood shingles!

Does anyone know of posts that get into the specific situation of installing a wall pass-through to connect to an exterior metal chimney (i.e. passing through an external wood-framed wall rather than into an existing masonry chimney)? [I searched the forums but did not find any]. Specifically I am wondering about what parts and clearances I would need to make the existing masonry crock tube safe as it passes through the wall and to the outside of the building, or whether it would be better to scrap the crock and use a thimble.

In my situation I am thinking a new, safe pass-through and chimney would mean:
  1. installing a thimble / new pass-through (either removing the existing masonry crock or adapting it, or closing it up and installing a thimble higher up on the wall)
  2. as part of the thimble installation: opening up the wall from the exterior of cabin (i.e. removing the shingles, and a section of the wall boards), and reconfiguring the studs and framing to get the necessary clearances.
  3. connecting the horizontal pipe to a tee and a double-walled chimney on the outside of the cabin (with the necessary brackets and roof bracing).
Does that sound about right?

Alternatively, I could also forget the wall pass-through, opt for a new stove with a flue on top, and run a new chimney straight through the roof. While I’d like to use the existing rear flue it seems like the vertical chimney would be a less expensive and complex installation and would also widen my choice of stove (since it would not have to have a rear flue at a specific height). What do think? Pros/cons?
You would be running a peice of chimney pipe through the framed wall and brick and attaching your stove pipe to that inside. What ever chimney manufacturer will provide all of the required components.
 
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Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
17,484
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
Having the required 12” of masonry all around the crock is not just about the wall facing behind the stove. That 12” of masonry is required all the way so your 2x4s in the wall and the exterior siding violate the 12” clearance.

They sell kits for through the wall installs. The kits are made to provide required clearances. That’s what I would look for if you want to keep this out and up setup.

Or, you could go vertical from the stove through the roof. It’s a better installation but obviously more difficult.