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Stelcom66

Minister of Fire
Nov 6, 2014
518
Connecticut
Ok you can't just post something that yummie looking without giving some details. ;lol
Is that battered and baked and then Broiled to get it so crisp looking?

Yea really - that could be on the cover of a cooking magazine!

I've brought in a couple of 5 gallon buckets of wood from the garage. I have wood from cut up pallets for kindling on hand, using some of that too.
 

PaulOinMA

Minister of Fire
Oct 20, 2018
1,020
MA
Chicken looks great!

Yesterday's high in Worcester, MA was 44 degrees. 7 degrees lower than the previous record of 51!
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,931
07462
Yes, that seems like a conflicting sight - smoke from the chimney with everything green and growing, and maybe a window open!

Here too, we need the rain which will benefit the garden. A question for those who cook inside the grill - I assume anything is wrapped in foil? Next fall I may try a baked potato that way.
I've gone about things a few different ways, assuming your referring to cooking on the woodstove itself. 2 type of cooking w/ a cast iron pan, 1st way the typical on top of the stove - grilled cheese, grilled vegetables, 2nd way when the fire is down to coal - throw the pan into the stove on top of the coals, great for a quick ny strip steak, grilled / roasted vegetables, chicken cutlets, 3rd way is the when the stove is down to coals, move them to one side and wrap potatoes in foil and throw them on the opposite side and turn them after 20min.
Cooking with cast iron direct to coals is by far my favorite though. I went to walmart and bought a cheapo lodge 10" skillet, took it home and re-ground the metal with a grinding disk on a drill, took about 15min that left the metal smooth like butter, washed it out then took some vegetable oil and seasoned the pan in the over at 450 for 15min, that cheap pan is my favorite pan, so much so that I bought a 12", 16" & dutch oven, all doing the same with grinding, nothing sticks to the bottom and all it use is a little olive oil and butter when cooking.
 
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Stelcom66

Minister of Fire
Nov 6, 2014
518
Connecticut
I've gone about things a few different ways, assuming your referring to cooking on the woodstove itself.....

My bad - meant to say in the woodstove itself. Good tips on cooking inside the stove. I have a small pan I use in the outside grill, it may be suitable for use in the stove too. Cast iron of course would be better.
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
958
Massachusetts
Ok you can't just post something that yummie looking without giving some details. ;lol
Is that battered and baked and then Broiled to get it so crisp looking?

Haha OK fair enough and thanks for the compliments! We're a dark meat house so I use bone in thighs and drumsticks:

Start with a quick 5-7 minute parboil, cool on drying rack, then a 12-24h soak in buttermilk. Remove from the milk and coat extremely liberally with seasoning then dredge in flour that also has more of the seasoning mixed into it. I use a mix of paprika, garlic powder, cayenne, salt, and, pepper. I let the chicken sit for at 15 minutes before frying to allow the flour to adhere well. I use canola oil at 350 in my Dutch oven to fry until golden. Peanut oil also works very well, actually a little better imo, but its very expensive so I stick with canola.

You can skip the parboil step and go with raw chicken but I find that just the quick 5-7 min really helps the chicken finish in the oil without burning the crust or sacrificing flavor and you can just focus on getting that golden color. The real key is being heavy handed on the seasoning and allowing it to adhere before frying.

Bon Appétit!

Perhaps frying in the stove top would take it to the next level but I wouldn't want all that splatter on my stove!
 

fire_man

Minister of Fire
Feb 6, 2009
2,464
North Eastern MA
Haha OK fair enough and thanks for the compliments! We're a dark meat house so I use bone in thighs and drumsticks:

Start with a quick 5-7 minute parboil, cool on drying rack, then a 12-24h soak in buttermilk. Remove from the milk and coat extremely liberally with seasoning then dredge in flour that also has more of the seasoning mixed into it. I use a mix of paprika, garlic powder, cayenne, salt, and, pepper. I let the chicken sit for at 15 minutes before frying to allow the flour to adhere well. I use canola oil at 350 in my Dutch oven to fry until golden. Peanut oil also works very well, actually a little better imo, but its very expensive so I stick with canola.

You can skip the parboil step and go with raw chicken but I find that just the quick 5-7 min really helps the chicken finish in the oil without burning the crust or sacrificing flavor and you can just focus on getting that golden color. The real key is being heavy handed on the seasoning and allowing it to adhere before frying.

Bon Appétit!

Perhaps frying in the stove top would take it to the next level but I wouldn't want all that splatter on my stove!

Thanks for the great details!

The darker areas on some of the pieces looked like broiling was involved but it sounds like it was totally deep fried. I agree with the parboil, I use a similar method making the greatest buffalo wings.
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
958
Massachusetts
Thanks for the great details!

The darker areas on some of the pieces looked like broiling was involved but it sounds like it was totally deep fried. I agree with the parboil, I use a similar method making the greatest buffalo wings.

Yep, parboil makes more dishes but it's worth it. I think steaming would work too if you had a big enough apparatus.

Full deep fry on the chicken. The dark spots are where the chicken contacted the dutch oven as it was frying. Those are the best bites!
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,534
South Puget Sound, WA
Moving the cold weather cooking to the Inglenook.