Pellet stove for Yurt--recommendations?

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cascadesforestboy

New Member
Sep 23, 2021
9
97401
Hello!

I am looking for a pellet stove for my newly built yurt. It's 450 sq feet with insulated floor, wall, and ceiling (though it will never be as well insulated as a real house). I'm in Oregon in the Willamette valley where average low temps in winter are in the low 30s. The yurt is my year round residence and the stove would be the primary heat source.

The main contender right now is Comfortbilt HP21. I was looking at Castle Serenity, but I found out that it will not automatically turn itself on/off in thermostat mode which I do not like as we have big day/night temperature differences in fall and spring.

I'd like to get something under $2000. Are there any other stoves in this price range that I should consider? Hoping for something with decent quality (I know I won't be getting top shelf with my budget, but everything is relative), and would love a fan that is not super loud. Don't mind a smaller hopper as long as it can burn at least like 15 hours on low.

Thanks!!
 

rich2500

Minister of Fire
Nov 19, 2005
1,393
Berks County PA.
The comfortbilt won't cycle on and off either in temp mode actually Most stoves in your budget range won't cycle off and on. The pelpro PP 90 is one that will.
 
Last edited:

johneh

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2009
3,742
Eastern Ontario
For a yurt I think I would want a stove that idles down upon
reaching a set temp . I feel that in basically a tent the on/off
would not work . Temp would drop too fast for the stove to cool
enough for the igniter to fire up
 
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cascadesforestboy

New Member
Sep 23, 2021
9
97401
For a yurt I think I would want a stove that idles down upon
reaching a set temp . I feel that in basically a tent the on/off
would not work . Temp would drop too fast for the stove to cool
enough for the igniter to fire up
Yeah I definitely need one with a thermostat. I want the on/off function too because of the large day/night temperature differences. For example, right now where I live it gets into the low 40s at night/early mornings, but during the days it’s in the 70s. When I go to bed it’s still too warm to turn the heat on, but by like 4am the yurt is freezing. So I’d like to be able to set it to cycle on while I sleep so I don’t have to wake up super cold.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,417
South Puget Sound, WA
Yeah I definitely need one with a thermostat. I want the on/off function too because of the large day/night temperature differences. For example, right now where I live it gets into the low 40s at night/early mornings, but during the days it’s in the 70s. When I go to bed it’s still too warm to turn the heat on, but by like 4am the yurt is freezing. So I’d like to be able to set it to cycle on while I sleep so I don’t have to wake up super cold.
With thermostatic control the stove will not run during the 70º days if it is not calling for heat. Put a cheap digital thermostat on it make the daytime temp low, but it may not be necessary. Or put a manual thermostat and set it at 60º during the daytime on sunny days.
 

cascadesforestboy

New Member
Sep 23, 2021
9
97401
In the owners manual for the HP21 it says if you turn on the “eco setting” it will cycle on and off
D6788376-A1DF-4C05-83D9-E11995462218.jpeg
 

cascadesforestboy

New Member
Sep 23, 2021
9
97401
With thermostatic control the stove will not run during the 70º days if it is not calling for heat. Put a cheap digital thermostat on it make the daytime temp low, but it may not be necessary. Or put a manual thermostat and set it at 60º during the daytime on sunny days.
I might have misunderstood this but I think it depends on the stove. In the Castle Serenity owners manual it states that using the stove in thermostat mode does NOT mean it will cycle on and off. It will simply “idle” once desired temp has been reached but stove will still be lit and consuming pellets.

Is it pretty easy to install an external thermostat?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,417
South Puget Sound, WA
Yes, it depends on the stove. I would get one that shuts off completely when there is no demand for heat. Usually hooking up a thermostat is very easy. Just too wires. Be sure it is a milivolt thermostat and place it out of the radiant range of the stove to reduce short cycling.
 

rich2500

Minister of Fire
Nov 19, 2005
1,393
Berks County PA.
In the owners manual for the HP21 it says if you turn on the “eco setting” it will cycle on and off
My bad your correct, The comfortbilt would definately be one to consider, It sounds like for your use one that does cycle off and on would be the way to go since this will be your primary heat.
 
Last edited:

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
For a yurt I think I would want a stove that idles down upon
reaching a set temp . I feel that in basically a tent the on/off
would not work . Temp would drop too fast for the stove to cool
enough for the igniter to fire up
I agree. better to buy one that will modulate the burn rate to compensate for temperature rather than a full on and off and that brings me to a point and that point is I presume you are entirely off grid and depending on a solar array and storage batteries and an inverter for power. Any stove that cycles completely on and off will be a power hog when starting because the ignitor is a resistance Cal Rod and it's very current inefficient as in uses serious wattage to heat the fuel bed to ignition. Your solar array and storage battery set up (I presume that is what you will have), needs to be sized accordingly or you will run out of juice rather quickly.

Stoves don't pull a ton of wattage when running (usually less than 150 watts running the room air blower and combustion fan blower), but the Cal Rod ignition really sucks the juice. You need to consider that so if I were you, I'd be looking at a unit that don't shut down entirely, but reduces the fuel input when the remote t'stat is satisfied.

How mine is actually, no Cal Rod ignition at all (manual light with firestarter soaked pellets and a match) once the fuel bed is established I auger in field corn and wood pellets mixed to keep it burning and when my remote T'stat is satisfied the room temp has reached a pre set level, my unit reduces fuel delivery to a point where the fire stays lit but little heat is produced, in fact, at that point my room air blower will short cycle because the firebox temp has dropped below the snap disc threshold to activate it.

On utility power, it's a non issue but on solar (or wind) with storage batteries and an inverter, Cal rod ignition could be a huge problem. Never been a fan of either source of juice because when the sun don't shine, you produce no juice and up where you are, sunny days can be far apart.

You need to think about that before buying any stove.
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
Yeah I definitely need one with a thermostat. I want the on/off function too because of the large day/night temperature differences. For example, right now where I live it gets into the low 40s at night/early mornings, but during the days it’s in the 70s. When I go to bed it’s still too warm to turn the heat on, but by like 4am the yurt is freezing. So I’d like to be able to set it to cycle on while I sleep so I don’t have to wake up super cold.
Sounds to me like it's time for a good goose down mummy bag....lol
 
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SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
I have a never used (in the stuff sack) KUIU mummy bag that is rated to -20 degrees (f) that I'll sell you. Never used it, bought it with a KUIU package (hunting clothes and Merino Wool undies) I bought a few years ago. We go on outfitted hunts so most times we stay in a lodge or a heated wall tent so I don't need it and have never used it.
 

BigJohnfromCT

Feeling the Heat
Dec 29, 2012
284
Danbury, CT
Where exactly does one put a pellet stove in a yurt? I would expect in the middle but most stoves force hot air out the front. Given that most stoves use a fan for combustion air wouldn't it be sucking in lots of cold air? How does one install an OAK in a yurt? I'm so curious about this, my questions are endless. Also, I'd LOVE to see pictures.
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
Good question. I'd say near a wall but the walls are round so where???
 

Washed-Up

Minister of Fire
Nov 5, 2011
775
Kananaskis,Alberta, Canada
I would think opposite the entrance, could be a trial and error situation though
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
Kind of wondering about the venting. Isn't the walls of a Yurt fabric? Could be interesting as far as venting goes.
 
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johneh

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2009
3,742
Eastern Ontario

Add Conventional, Radiant, or Solar Heating

Yurt with Cozy Stove Heating approaches that work in traditional buildings also work for yurts. Ducts for heat pumps and central heating systems may be installed beneath the yurt’s floor or ductless heat pumps may be used. Propane stoves, pellet stoves, and wood stoves will also work but should be vented through the wall rather than the roof, as this will make it easier to clean the chimney while also minimizing the chance of roof damage by venting embers. Electric heaters are also popular, assuming you’ve added an electrical system. Radiant heating, via below-floor or wall units, is a wonderful way to heat yurts as well. Finally, some use solar power to heat their yurts inappropriate conditions with modest heating requirements.

Whatever option you select, remember that it is always best to have two heating sources. For instance, if your heating system uses electricity, it’s smart to have a wood stove as well for times when the electrical grid is out or have a generator on hand.

One Article I read
 

cascadesforestboy

New Member
Sep 23, 2021
9
97401
L
I have a never used (in the stuff sack) KUIU mummy bag that is rated to -20 degrees (f) that I'll sell you. Never used it, bought it with a KUIU package (hunting clothes and Merino Wool undies) I bought a few years ago. We go on outfitted hunts so most times we stay in a lodge or a heated wall tent so I don't need it and have never used it.
Lol I appreciate the offer but I already own a -20 degree sleeping bag and I don’t particularly want to use it unless I’m snow camping. This is where I’m living permanently for the next few years and my life is too stressful to not sleep in real bedding and sheets!
 

cascadesforestboy

New Member
Sep 23, 2021
9
97401
I agree. better to buy one that will modulate the burn rate to compensate for temperature rather than a full on and off and that brings me to a point and that point is I presume you are entirely off grid and depending on a solar array and storage batteries and an inverter for power. Any stove that cycles completely on and off will be a power hog when starting because the ignitor is a resistance Cal Rod and it's very current inefficient as in uses serious wattage to heat the fuel bed to ignition. Your solar array and storage battery set up (I presume that is what you will have), needs to be sized accordingly or you will run out of juice rather quickly.

Stoves don't pull a ton of wattage when running (usually less than 150 watts running the room air blower and combustion fan blower), but the Cal Rod ignition really sucks the juice. You need to consider that so if I were you, I'd be looking at a unit that don't shut down entirely, but reduces the fuel input when the remote t'stat is satisfied.

How mine is actually, no Cal Rod ignition at all (manual light with firestarter soaked pellets and a match) once the fuel bed is established I auger in field corn and wood pellets mixed to keep it burning and when my remote T'stat is satisfied the room temp has reached a pre set level, my unit reduces fuel delivery to a point where the fire stays lit but little heat is produced, in fact, at that point my room air blower will short cycle because the firebox temp has dropped below the snap disc threshold to activate it.

On utility power, it's a non issue but on solar (or wind) with storage batteries and an inverter, Cal rod ignition could be a huge problem. Never been a fan of either source of juice because when the sun don't shine, you produce no juice and up where you are, sunny days can be far apart.

You need to think about that before buying any stove.
Thank you for this thoughtful response but I’m actually on the grid!
 

cascadesforestboy

New Member
Sep 23, 2021
9
97401
Where exactly does one put a pellet stove in a yurt? I would expect in the middle but most stoves force hot air out the front. Given that most stoves use a fan for combustion air wouldn't it be sucking in lots of cold air? How does one install an OAK in a yurt? I'm so curious about this, my questions are endless. Also, I'd LOVE to see pictures.
In traditional Mongolian yurts stoves are placed in the center and vented out the roof. It’s the most energy efficient location and you also get the heat from the long chimney pipe. But in modern yurts it’s more common to put stoves along the wall. Pacific Yurts, the company that I bought mine from, recommends venting through the wall rather than the roof as to protect the roof fabric from soot and ash. I’m putting my pellet stove along the wall about 6 feet from the front door. I’ll try to remember to upload a pic of the stove once I have it installed!
 
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