Tick talk

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bigealta

Minister of Fire
May 22, 2010
1,820
Utah & NJ
Mod edit, moved to Wood Shed from the What I learned thread:

I'd add/change to cut in winter. Not only more comfortable temps but tick exposure is a big deal that does not get talked about very much. Cutting at around 32F or below will negate exposure to lyme ticks, and i think under 40F drastically reduces exposure risk. You can also spray clothes with permethrin. Lyme is not what you want to get.
 
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I'd add/change to cut in winter. Not only more comfortable temps but tick exposure is a big deal that does not get talked about very much. Cutting at around 32F or below will negate exposure to lyme ticks, and i think under 40F drastically reduces exposure risk. You can also spray clothes with permethrin. Lyme is not what you want to get.
When I played paintball, I knew some guys that would wear pantyhose to keep the ticks off their legs. No idea if it is hot in the summer though.
 
When I played paintball, I knew some guys that would wear pantyhose to keep the ticks off their legs. No idea if it is hot in the summer though.
My wife is working at the desk next to mine, and I had a momentary thought to ask her. But then I realized she's going to have a lot of questions as to why I'm asking about whether pantyhose are hot in summer, while reading hearth.com.
 
My wife is working at the desk next to mine, and I had a momentary thought to ask her. But then I realized she's going to have a lot of questions as to why I'm asking about whether pantyhose are hot in summer, while reading hearth.com.
Yeah, that could raise some eyebrows.
 
3 strokes with a file every time you add fuel. You can feel if they need another. Easier on the body to keep it sharp.

I spray the boots and pants with Cutters to deter ticks. Had the Lyme issue last Summer, and am leery of a repeat.
I spray my clothes with permethrin. Good for multiple washes.
Shoes, socks, long sleeve shirt, and pants, and hat.
 
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For those using OFF, Cutters etc. to deter ticks, i was told by the county tick experts that they Do Not work at all for ticks. They say Permethrin is the only thing that works. I've had very good results with it.
 
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We have a ton of deer in our area, looking at a half dozen in my lawn now as I type this, and so we have a lot of lose lovely Lyme-carrier deer ticks. In talking with our dog’s vet about it, she said there are three common species in our area, and that different tick block products are more successful in blocking different species. WRT the dog, there was only one product known to block all three of the species commonly found around here.

Point being, it seems likely based on this, that the product which works best on the ticks in one part of the country may not be the same that works best in another.
 
We have a ton of deer in our area, looking at a half dozen in my lawn now as I type this, and so we have a lot of lose lovely Lyme-carrier deer ticks. In talking with our dog’s vet about it, she said there are three common species in our area, and that different tick block products are more successful in blocking different species. WRT the dog, there was only one product known to block all three of the species commonly found around here.

Point being, it seems likely based on this, that the product which works best on the ticks in one part of the country may not be the same that works best in another.
If you are talking about dog tick prevention yes that's true, it even says so on some packages that only 1 type of tick is controlled with their product. I use seresto collar and sometimes frontline plus as well for my dog.

For humans it's permethrin on the clothes. You are not supposed to use it on the skin. so i wouldn't use it on any animals.
 
We use a lint roller on the dog and our socks, pants, shirts and even our arms when I come in from walking the dog or working. The lint roller pulled six ticks off the dog this year and another 4 (2 each) off our clothing.

I did spray the permethrin on some socks, shirts, pants and work boots earlier this spring and then just socks and pants.
 
I use permethrin for my hunting clothes. For just around the yard, I just check when I come in. Had Lyme disease once and fortunately I got the classic Bullseye and noticed it before symptoms hit. More worried about the Lone Star Tick and the Meat Allergy now.
 
My wife has a dozen ginnies. They think they are people and follow her around when she is in the yard. They love ticks. We had lots of them but none after the birds came here, The birds think ticks are delish.
 
Ginnies are a hoot to watch. They can collectively loose their minds in a heart beat.
 
I used to live in central Georgia. I bought an acre of land and built my house. Right there in my yard, I had 3 dozen fire ant nests. They make a mound several inches high, and if they get hold of you, fire ants will bite you badly.
I got some kind of poison and eradicated the fire ants.
After that I noticed my cat was getting lots of ticks. I began to wonder, "What do fire ants eat?"
I figured that they would eat ticks. I let the fire ants alone, and in a year, I had 3 dozen new fire ant nests. And my cat no longer got ticks. I had 4,000 fire ants patrolling for ticks.
 
Anyone know what this is? I pulled it off the dog just now. It's almost like a soft shelled tick... the weather is 20F-40F recently, which is usually too cold for ticks?

tempImage1Y0GN1.png
 
40F is unfortunately not to cold for ticks. That is an engorged tick. Does your county identify them? It's grey because it's engorged with your dogs blood.
 
That does indeed appear to be one of the
First time I see a grey one of those little f*ers.
Ditto, and I'm not that far from the OP, just a few hours' drive. Our ticks around here are all various flavors and sizes of brown, with different markings on their backs.
 
We've had our fair share of those here in NJ. Dog ticks look just like that when engorged.
 
I contracted Lyme while through-hiking the Appalachian Trail in 1999. Found the tick in NY at Lake Tiorati. Massive antibiotics and all better. I also contracted Alpha-Gal Syndrome (commonly known as "red meat allergy") on my property in Indiana in July of 2020. Haven't had any mammal anything since...and it does suck. No treatment/cure...can go away but I've been bit twice since then, and my "numbers" aren't good. If you live east of the Rockies, you need to protect yourself when in the woods.
 
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I spray my clothes with permethrin. Good for multiple washes.
Shoes, socks, long sleeve shirt, and pants, and hat.
You can also get clothes pre-treated...supposed to last the life time of the garment (70 washes). Look for Insect Shield branded items. I use them to hunt morels after I contracted Alpha-Gal, they work great. The bites I've had since diagnosis were frustratingly incidental...at home in my driveway (ticks don't care about gravel despite the internet "knowledge") and after work at cross country meets for my boys. Seriously considering wearing my permethrin treated clothes constantly once spring come around.
 
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