Well, we found the "ultimate" kindling

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eclecticcottage

Minister of Fire
Dec 7, 2011
1,803
WNY
Last year we had collected a 5-6 (55 gallon or so) totes full of driftwood, and air/sun dried it. It was meant for some projects, but we faced the fact that we don't have time and it's taking up space. Plus if we want more, we'll have it next spring in our backyard. So we brought a few totes over to the Cottage from the Old House.

Holy scha-moly. We have to get a moisture meter so I'm not sure where it's at moisture wise, but it burns like it's soaked in gasoline. I know it has to be pretty dry since it's been in plastic totes with the lids on and hasn't mildewed or left moisture on the inside of the lids. Beats resplitting the scotch pine we've had CSS'd since last summer. We'll probably collect a tote or two this season for kindling again, maybe even some bigger pieces for shoulder season wood. Although it helped us to our first overfire though so we definately need to remember the power of ultra dry seasoned to bleached white wood!!

*disclaimer-this is FRESHWATER driftwood, not saltwater. No corrosive salt here.
 

Wood Duck

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2009
4,790
Central PA
I too have found that freshwater driftwood can be really dry. On many occasions wood I have found along a lake or river and burned in a campfire has been really dry. I think soaking in water does something to the cell structure that allows the wood to dry out more easily when it is removed from the water. I have no evidence of this, but it sure seems that driftwood dries very easily and very completely.
 
S

ScotO

Guest
just don't use driftwood that is from a saltwater source.....the salt that is absorbed by the wood is very hard on your stovepipe and stove.....
 
S

ScotO

Guest
disregard my last post. I didn't see the *disclaimer* my first time through your original post....sorry!
 

JrCRXHF

Burning Hunk
Apr 28, 2008
226
Mid, Michigan
this would work good but i use charcoal for the BBQ as a fire starter i had some stuff that got some diesel on it so i did not want to use it in the indoor grill so i used it to start the boiler not i am hooked. Put 4 little bricks down on some cardboard and some wood on top and then light and close the door.
 

chvymn99

Minister of Fire
Nov 20, 2010
652
Kansas
Dried Hedge limbs from dead branches....quick and hot little fire starters.
 
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