What Is In Your Stove Right Now?

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Put in a load of cherry for the night.

I may let it go out tomorrow because the temps are supposed to go up into the 40s and I need to shovel the stove out anyway.
 
Little stove still at 200 STT at 7:30. 24 outside temp. Voda fan still running on stovetop. House still 67 downstairs. Nice that I don’t need an overnight load to keep the heat from callling. Saves wood. Had some coals but not much. Did a bottom up fire this AM since flue nice and warm. 4x smaller oak splits and a biobrick to get things going. Nice secondary’s STT almost 600 now.

Update: almost 2 hours since I started the stove and 72 downstairs now. 28 outside temp now.
 
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I’m coming up on 1.5 cords so far this season, almost entirely hickory. I never burned solely hickory before, in the past the most I ever had was a little mixed in with my usual diet of oak, so I’m really just noticing for the first time the absolutely INSANE amount of ash this wood produces. I could do well to empty the ash out of the firebox after every 2-3 loads on hickory, whereas I normally go 14-16 loads with oak before even thinking about it. Never seen anything like this.

On the plus side, it’s dense and heavy wood, even after 4 years drying in a shed. I haven’t bothered looking up the numbers on it, but I can tell by how warm our house is, that packs a solid BTU punch. This stuff is split larger than normally split my oak, knowing it’d be drying 3-4 years under roof, so I’m getting a lot of pounds into each load
 
We had a low of 13.8 this morning, the basement was 70 with the temps up here 63 & 64. The first pine fire had the basement where the couch is at 77.

I did run the propane fireplace/insert this morning after coffee, the temps up here are 66 & 68.

We usually run the pellet stove at night with a low we had this morning but I'm holding off until December......except for a test run.
 
Got up this morning and the wife had a shoulder season fire ripping along with a flue temp over 850, stt coming up 👍. I mentioned that I don't usually take it that high and she said very matter of factly "I do". I guess she told me...😂
 
Got up this morning and the wife had a shoulder season fire ripping along with a flue temp over 850, stt coming up 👍. I mentioned that I don't usually take it that high and she said very matter of factly "I do". I guess she told me...😂
I often have conversations in my head that go like "Well I'm glad she started it. She's doing something slightly wrong or id prefer another way but if I say something I know what's going to happen". 10 out of 10 times it's easier to deal with my own thoughts after than actually saying something. Is say I only say something now 2/10 times and regret it every time lol. Room for improvement!
 
Today just have a little half load going adding a log at a time while the sun warms up. I was bringing up wood from the basement and threw a split in my back. The bark flew off (awesome dry wood) but to my surprise like 100 alive carpenter ants also exploded into my log bag. Yikes. I'm glad I threw it in the bag not my rack upstairs. This is 3 year old maple they were happy as a clam in there. Maybe being in the warm basement for a few days woke them from dormancy. I took the bag out back dumped it out and brought the wood back in, all set! Never know what you'll find in the wood stacks. Bugs, rodents, snakes, etc. Always a surprise.
 
I’m coming up on 1.5 cords so far this season, almost entirely hickory. I never burned solely hickory before, in the past the most I ever had was a little mixed in with my usual diet of oak, so I’m really just noticing for the first time the absolutely INSANE amount of ash this wood produces. I could do well to empty the ash out of the firebox after every 2-3 loads on hickory, whereas I normally go 14-16 loads with oak before even thinking about it. Never seen anything like this.

On the plus side, it’s dense and heavy wood, even after 4 years drying in a shed. I haven’t bothered looking up the numbers on it, but I can tell by how warm our house is, that packs a solid BTU punch. This stuff is split larger than normally split my oak, knowing it’d be drying 3-4 years under roof, so I’m getting a lot of pounds into each load
Yeah I started into my hickory stack and noticed the same. Mine as well call it ash but yes very dense and lots of btus and long burning
 
That's how I feel when I hit a streak of red maple in my stacks. Clean the stove out just about daily versus once a week with oak.
 
High 20s dF overnight temps here, with low-to-mid 40s daytimes. Clear and sunny (the weather must be imported from California). Expecting the same at least through mid-week.

Stove kept the inside temps in the mid-60s overnight, even on minimum air, and low-70s daytime on 1/4 air, loaded with hemlock and alder.

Just starting to learn the flue temp patterns shown on the Auber thermometer.
 
I’m coming up on 1.5 cords so far this season, almost entirely hickory. I never burned solely hickory before, in the past the most I ever had was a little mixed in with my usual diet of oak, so I’m really just noticing for the first time the absolutely INSANE amount of ash this wood produces. I could do well to empty the ash out of the firebox after every 2-3 loads on hickory, whereas I normally go 14-16 loads with oak before even thinking about it. Never seen anything like this.

On the plus side, it’s dense and heavy wood, even after 4 years drying in a shed. I haven’t bothered looking up the numbers on it, but I can tell by how warm our house is, that packs a solid BTU punch. This stuff is split larger than normally split my oak, knowing it’d be drying 3-4 years under roof, so I’m getting a lot of pounds into each load
Funny timing, I just made a post in the BK forum. This shagbark hickory is something else. I have about a cord at least to go. If there was a ash vac that could take everything out of the king in one shot hot coals and all I’d buy one. Even if it was a grand. That fine dust is like sanding Sheetrock.

Anyhow I brought it down to the bricks and started up again with some of the same.
 
We had a low of 27.5 this morning, the basement started off at 70 with the temps up here 66, 67 & 68. I loaded up the Liberty with pine this morning.
 
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Threw some oak in just now. She's roaring away and I'm trapped under 200 lbs of dog.

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Just got the stove going for the evening, it has a load of pine.

We had a winter storm almost 3 years ago snap a bunch of 6+" branches off the pine trees so I cut it up for pit wood. Darn if that stuff hasn't made me a fan of burning pine during shoulder season.
I am in Virginia as well. Are you burning southern yellow pine? I was considering trying to burn it. I have 6 huge logs of it. I have only ever burned hardwood.
 
Woke up 30F outside, 59F in living room (strangely cold). About 1/3 of burnt out coal towards the back of the firebox.

Got a full load of ash going right now. Is it possible I need to keep throttle a little more open after fixing the leaky doors?
 
Is it possible I need to keep throttle a little more open after fixing the leaky doors?
Absolutely. A faulty gasket would let more air in so you need to replace that air to get your usual burning conditions.
 
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Woke up 30F outside, 59F in living room (strangely cold). About 1/3 of burnt out coal towards the back of the firebox.

Got a full load of ash going right now. Is it possible I need to keep throttle a little more open after fixing the leaky doors?
possible,but should get enough air from inside house
 
I am in Virginia as well. Are you burning southern yellow pine? I was considering trying to burn it. I have 6 huge logs of it. I have only ever burned hardwood.

Phew, old post. That was a couple of homes ago but I want to say yes that was one of the species of pines known as southern yellow, most likely shortleaf pine. Since then I've burned a couple of cords of pine, mostly white and red pine. Just make sure that I keep the chimney clean, give it time to properly dry, and monitor the temperature of the stove. Haven't had an issue with it.
 
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